Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

493 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Supporting Narrative Writing Proficiency and Engagement in a Montessori Upper Elementary Classroom through the Writing Workshop Model and 6+1 Traits of Writing

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research project set out to determine the effects of daily writing workshop lessons, including the 6+1 Traits of Writing vocabulary, on student writing proficiency and engagement. An upper elementary classroom of 17 students, consisting of nine fourth graders and eight fifth graders, in an independent, suburban Montessori school participated in this study. Students completed a five-week narrative writing unit from Calkins, Ochs, & Luick’s (2017) Up the Ladder curriculum. The teacher-researcher collected data through observation, writing prompts scored using a 6+1 Traits of Writing rubric, student feedback forms, Bottomley, Henk, & Melnick’s (1997/1998) Writer Self-Perception Scale, and small group feedback sessions. The data suggested that students, particularly weaker writers, made gains in writing proficiency. Further research is necessary to determine if students would be more engaged in writing than other subjects and if classrooms with a full three-year age span would make similar gains in writing proficiency.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Article

The Importance of Cursive Handwriting Over Typewriting for Learning in the Classroom: A High-Density EEG Study of 12-Year-Old Children and Young Adults

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 11

Pages: Article 1810

See More

Abstract/Notes: To write by hand, to type, or to draw – which of these strategies is the most efficient for optimal learning in the classroom? As digital devices are increasingly replacing traditional writing by hand, it is crucial to examine the long-term implications of this practice. High-density electroencephalogram (HD EEG) was used in twelve young adults and twelve 12-year-old children to study brain electrical activity as they were writing in cursive by hand, typewriting, or drawing visually presented words that were varying in difficulty. Analyses of temporal spectral evolution (time-dependent amplitude changes) were performed on EEG data recorded with a 256-channel sensor array. For the young adults, we found that when writing by hand using a digital pen on a touchscreen, brain areas in the parietal and central regions showed event-related synchronized activity in the theta range. Existing literature suggests that such oscillatory neuronal activity in these particular brain areas is important for memory and for the encoding of new information and, therefore, provides the brain with optimal conditions for learning. When drawing, we found similar activation patterns in the parietal areas, in addition to event-related desynchronization in the alpha/beta range, suggesting both similarities but also slight differences in activation patterns when drawing and writing by hand. When typewriting on a keyboard, we found event-related desynchronized activity in the theta range and, to a lesser extent, in the alpha range in parietal and central brain regions. However, as this activity was desynchronized and differed from when writing by hand and drawing, its relation to learning remains unclear. For the 12-year-old children, the same activation patterns were found, but to a lesser extent. We suggest that children, from an early age, must be exposed to handwriting and drawing activities in school to establish the neuronal oscillation patterns that are beneficial for learning. We conclude that because of the benefits of sensory-motor integration due to the larger involvement of the senses as well as fine and precisely-controlled hand movements when writing by hand and when drawing, it is vital to maintain both activities in a learning environment to facilitate and optimize learning.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01810

ISSN: 1664-1078

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Cultivating a Writer’s Identity: The Effect of Writing Workshop on Writing Proficiency and Confidence in an Intermediate Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research investigated the effect of Writing Workshop on the writing proficiency and confidence of intermediate Montessori students. The study took place in a public community school of a major Canadian city with 24 participants of a grade 4, 5, and 6 Montessori classroom. Research was conducted over a six-week period and implemented Calkins, Ochs, and Luick’s (2017) Up the Ladder Writing Workshop Narrative Unit. Data was collected using writing samples scored by adapted 6+1 Traits of Writing Rubrics and students’ self-assessed scores using adapted 6+1 Traits of Writing Student Rubrics, adapted Bottomley et al.’s (1997/1998) Writer Self-Perception Scales, writing surveys, and observational field notes. The data demonstrated an increase in writing proficiency in 96% of students and feeling confident most of the time or always when writing by 31%. This action research recommends further research be done to supplement the Montessori language arts curriculum with Writing Workshop.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Handwriting Without Tears on Montessori Four-Year-Olds' Handwriting Ability

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The action research question for this study was, “What effect would the addition of a program by Handwriting Without Tears (HWT) called, Transition to Kindergarten, in a block everyday have on the development of handwriting skills of my four-year-old students?” Beyond utilizing the HWT program, the reviewed literature on handwriting instruction expounded on six major themes: brain benefits of handwriting, blocks of handwriting instruction (speed and legibility), name writing (gross & fine motor skills), the connection between writing and reading, and phonological awareness. This project was conducted in a private Montessori school in South Florida, where six preschool participants (age four) were studied and evaluated for six weeks. Data was compiled by using a presentation log, attitude scale, and a self-generated rubric to track the following: pencil firmness on paper, directionality, letter formation, spacing, line usage, circle closure, name writing, and copying a sentence to a line. The researcher's overall results were positive when assessing handwriting attributes of formation, size, neatness, speed, posture, pencil grip and helping hand position. Future implementation of the action research project will be introduced to the entire preschool as a new addition to the handwriting curriculum.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis

Clinical and Kinematic Characteristics of Cursive Handwriting in Elementary Age Children

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to study the clinical and kinematic characteristics of cursive handwriting in healthy third and fifth grade children. One hundred-nine children participated in this study; 53 were in grade three and 56 were in grade five. Five commonly used clinical assessments were selected addressing strength, sensorimotor and coordination characteristics specific to handwriting. Two handwriting assessments, the Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting-Cursive, and the writing subtest of the Jebsen Test of Hand Function, assessed speed and/or legibility of handwriting. A simple cursive writing task was also produced on a digitized tablet and analyzed for kinematic features. Multiple T-Tests were used to determine significant gender differences and the effects of maturation on handwriting. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine if clinical or kinematic characteristics were predictors of legibility in cursive handwriting. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine if clinical or kinematic characteristics of handwriting contributed to handwriting speed and legibility. Results of this study indicate that in all groups, boys had less legible handwriting than girls. With maturation, healthy children in the third and fifth grades improve in their ability to smoothly write in the up and down direction, which is complemented by improved hand steadiness and coordination. The strong association between the grooved pegboard and legibility suggest that improving a child's in-hand manipulation skills may contribute to improvement in handwriting skills. The Jebsen and grooved pegboard contributed to handwriting speed and legibility. The findings of this study will guide Occupational Therapists in improving their understanding of the clinical and kinematic mechanisms underlying handwriting, which are critical to the development of appropriate intervention paradigms.

Language: English

Published: Detroit, Michigan, 2012

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Using Computer and iPad Story-Writing Applications for Creative Writing with Kinder Year Students in a Montessori Early Childhood Program

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study investigated the viability and implications of technology-assisted story writing with kinder year students. Seven kinder year students at a private Montessori school participated in the study. Pre- and post-study conferences and Likert scales determined story writing skills and attitudes. These were followed by one-on-one storywriting sessions using a variety of story-writing tools. Students were given the choice of story-writing method at each session. Individual sessions were evaluated and completed stories compared to a rubric of fundamental story-writing elements. Stories written by the students improved with the use of computer and iPad programs, but independent story writing was not achieved. Individual phonetic abilities proved pivotal to any success with technology-assisted story writing. The results of the study suggest introducing technology-assisted story writing when a child can successfully build words phonetically.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Book Section

The Mechanism of Writing: An Analysis of the Movements of a Hand that is Writing; Direct Preparation for Writing; Intelligence Freed from Mechanisms; Composition of Words

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 217-244

Maria Montessori - Writings

See More

Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Peer Collaboration on Students’ Writing Skills and Their Attitude Towards Writing in a Hybrid Montessori Classroom of Second and Third Grade Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this technology-integrated research is to understand the effects peer collaboration has on students writing skills on 2nd and 3rd graders in a virtual setting. The research took place over five weeks in a lower elementary classroom in a private Montessori school in New England area. The population included 18 students ages 8 to 9. Students participated in a 5-week intervention process, working in groups of 3 on peer collaboration, sharing ideas, and creating group written work. The findings indicate an overall beneficial effect on children’s attitude towards writing, leading to better writing skills and communication skills. Collaborative writing in a technology-integrated platform positively impacted students’ typing skills. Continued research is necessary to assess additional domains such as cognitive improvement, vocabulary effects, and students’ specific writing skills.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Doctoral Dissertation

American Writings on Maria Montessori: An Inquiry into Changes in the Reception and Interpretations Given to Writings on Maria Montessori and Montessori Educational Ideas 1910-1915 and 1958-1970

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this dissertation will be to survey and analyze American writings on Maria Montessori and her educational system, in order to show how the idea of Montessori education has interacted with some changing American ideas and social forces. These changes in social and intellectual currents can be likened to a shift from centrifugal to centripetal force; or to the expansion and then the contraction of a universe. The central metaphor is the same. It is applicable to, and illustrative of, much about the changing social and educational scene in America. The writings on Montessori, examined against this framework, should provide a new view on certain changes in American educational thinking.

Language: English

Published: Kent, Ohio, 1973

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Does Storytelling Affect Story Writing in a Lower Elementary Classroom?

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study investigated the impact an oral storytelling component had on students’ story writing. The study took place over six weeks in an Elementary classroom at a small independent Montessori school. Eight Lower Elementary students (ages 6-9) listened to stories told by the teacher, or orally told ideas for their stories, prior to thirty minutes of story writing. Also, approximately halfway through the study, the students participated in a storytelling workshop conducted by a professional storyteller. Data sources included pre-intervention and weekly writing samples, engagement observations, a writing rubric to code the writing samples and a student writing attitude scale completed before and after the intervention. Over the course of the study, students’ time engaged in the writing process and quality and length of their stories increased. Additionally, after the storytelling workshop, improvement in student writing increased at a faster rate than before the workshop. Further research could study if an oral storytelling workshop implemented earlier in the school year could have a greater impact over a greater length of time.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Advanced Search