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622 results

Article

What Belongs in a Montessori Primary Classroom?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 23, no. 3

Pages: 18-32

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: There are two major types of Montessori teacher education in the United States: (1) AMI-USA (the American branch of the Association Montessori Internationale, founded by Dr. Montessori to carry on her work); and (2) AMS (American Montessori Society, founded by Nancy Rambusch to represent Montessori in America). This article presents the results from a survey which points out what materials are highly agreed on by teacher educators from both AMI and AMS centers to be necessary and/or desirable in a Montessori Primary classroom. There is a large set of agreed-upon materials across most areas, and with Art and Science/Geography--two areas to which Montessori herself allocated little attention in discussions of the first plane of development. For other areas, when there were divergences, they stemmed from two sources: (1) materials appearing to aim too high or too low (some Math and Language materials, for example, that are for children more advanced or some Practical Life materials that are preliminary to other skills); or (2) divergent opinions as to whether the activity has a clear positive developmental purpose (the tape recorder or fantasy books, for example). (Contains 2 footnotes.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

How Important Are the Montessori Materials?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 4

Pages: 20-25

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Over the past 5 years, the author has visited scores of Montessori classrooms, most of them in the United States and Canada, and has observed many commonalities among them. For example, in almost every classroom, children freely chose their activities and engaged hands-on with material objects. They took care of the environment, wiping up their own spills, and dusting and sweeping. Identifiable Montessori materials, like the Pink Tower and the Metal Insets, were always present on low shelves throughout the room. There was much variety, however, in the preponderance of other materials available and in use. What might the presence and use of these alternative materials mean for the children and their education and development? In this article, the author describes the interesting history and the importance of the Montessori materials.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Shunned and Admired: Montessori, Self-Determination, and a Case for Radical School Reform

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Educational Psychology Review, vol. 31

Pages: 939-965

Americas, Autonomy in children, Comparative education, Educational change, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Self-determination, Self-determination theory, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: School reform is an important national and international concern. The Montessori alternative school system is unique in that it is well-aligned with the science of healthy development and learning, has strong social–emotional and academic outcomes, is virtually unchanged in over a century, can be applied across all the school years, and still attracts considerable attention and allegiance—yet it remains Bon the margins^ (Whitescarver and Cossentino Teachers College Record, 110, 2571–2600, 2008) of the bulwark educational system, as often shunned as admired. Why does Montessori persist (and increasingly in the public sector) and why does it elicit such sharply contrasting reactions? This article reviews several reasons why it is admired, such as evidence of Montessori’s effectiveness, its alignment with educational psychology research, and its broad scope. The points of research alignment are presented as natural corollaries of Montessori’s central premise: independence, or self-determination. After discussing these extrinsic and intrinsic reasons why Montessori is admired, the article concludes with speculation as to why it is also shunned—namely its incommensurability with conventional education culture and what might be a consequence: frequent poor implementation. The incommensurability of evidence-based alternatives with the conventional system is also posed as a reason for radical school reform.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10648-019-09483-3

ISSN: 1040-726X, 1573-336X

Article

Playful Learning and Montessori Education

Available from: ERIC

Publication: American Journal of Play, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 157-186

Imagination, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Although Montessori education is often considered a form of playful learning, Maria Montessori herself spoke negatively about a major component of playful learning--pretend play, or fantasy--for young children. In this essay, the author discusses this apparent contradiction: how and why Montessori education includes elements of playful learning while simultaneously eschewing fantasy. She concludes with a discussion of research on the outcomes of Montessori education and on pretend-play research, clarifying how Montessori education relates to playful learning.

Language: English

ISSN: 1938-0399, 1938-0402

Article

International Links

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 82

Pages: 52

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Abstract/Notes: School in Mongolia; MACTE conference; summary of Angeline Lillard's article in Science, Sept 29, 2006

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Montessori: The Science Behind the Genius

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 16, no. 4

Pages: 8

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Abstract/Notes: Interview with Angeline Lillard, author of book by this title

Language: English

Article

Children’s Preference for Real Activities: Even Stronger in the Montessori Children’s House

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 1-9

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the United States, children are often given the opportunity to engage in pretend activities; many believe this kind of play benefits children’s development. Recent research has shown, though, that when children ages 4 to 6 are given a choice to do the pretend or the real version of 9 different activities, they would prefer the real one. The reasons children gave for preferring real activities often concerned their appreciation of the functionality; when children did prefer pretend activities, their reasons often cited being afraid of, not allowed to, or unable to do the real activity. Given that children in Montessori classrooms have more experience performing real, functional activities, in this study we asked if this preference for real activities is even stronger among children in Montessori schools. We also asked children to explain their preferences. The data are from 116 3- to 6-year-old children (M = 59.63 months, SD = 12.08 months; 68 female): 62 not in Montessori schools and 54 in Montessori schools. Children explained their preferences for pretendand real versions of 9 different activities. Children in Montessori schools preferred real activities even more than did children in other preschools, but all children explained their choices in similar ways. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to play in preschool classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.7586

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

When Researchers Come Knocking

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 7

Public Montessori, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Montessori Raises Achievement, Closes Gaps

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 22-23

Public Montessori, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: [Angeline S.] Lillard's new study shows promising results with low-income children.

Language: English

Article

$3 Million for Montessori Research

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 15

Public Montessori, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The first ever federally funded study of Montessori education. Highlights the work of Angeline S. Lillard.

Language: English

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