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564 results

Article

The Attention of the Child in Montessori's 1915 Glass-Walled Classroom

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 20, no. 4

Pages: 1, 8

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Language: English

Article

Attention to Detail: The Insets

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 7

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Language: English

Article

Attention to Detail: Pathways to Self-Perfection

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 6

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Teacher Beliefs, Attitudes, and Expectations Towards Students with Attention Disorders in Three Schools in the United Kingdom's Independent School System

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, England, Europe, Inclusive education, Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Perceptions, Scotland, Teachers - Attitudes, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: Scope and method of study. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the connection between the beliefs, attitudes, and expectations teachers exhibit towards students who have attention challenges in three independent schools in England and the pathognomonic-interventionist continuum as identified by Jordan-Wilson and Silverman (1991), which identifies, along a scale, where teachers' beliefs lie. Teachers' sense of efficacy as they meet individual student needs was also explored as was what educators in these schools, who have limited, if any, recourse to special education assistance, do to support students who display the characteristics of attention deficit. The pathognomonic-interventionist continuum and Bandura's (1977) construct of self-efficacy were the lenses used to focus the research. The study records participants' responses and reflections about the phenomenon under study, describing what it is they do, how they perceive their responsibility towards their students, and how they support each other. Findings and conclusions. Data compiled from a sample of 10 teachers and 3 head-teachers, were disaggregated to provide a picture of how participant teachers work with attentionally challenged children in selected English independent schools. The results provide evidence that teachers whose profile identifies them with the interventionist perspective present stronger senses of self-efficacy. They are prepared to undertake prereferral-type activities to determine where the student is experiencing difficulty and are then willing to manipulate the learning environment to meet individual student needs. Teachers in these schools perceive it as their professional obligation to design teaching scenarios to benefit all students. Teacher efficacy, their sense of their ability to positively influence their students' educational performance and achievement, is unrelated to years of experience or educational background, but is related to the beliefs which they hold.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2006

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Interactivity, Scaffolding and Modeling on Children’s Attention and Engagement During Read Aloud Time

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: In the early academic years, read aloud time is frequently incorporated in the daily classroom schedule. For our investigation, we wondered if certain strategies (interactivity, scaffolding, and modeling enthusiasm) would help to foster deeper connections, conversation, and literary skills when used during read aloud time. We observed teacher-directed read aloud time in two Montessori environments, one with toddlers ages 2-3, and one with elementary children ages 6-9. We used various sources of data collection methods to help us track student engagement and focus, with and without the strategies implemented. The results of the study showed that more children stayed focused and engaged longer during read aloud when the teacher used scaffolding, showed enthusiasm and was interactive while reading. When these strategies were not implemented during a read aloud time, children became more easily distracted and were less inclined to make related comments or ask questions. Interactivity, enthusiasm, and scaffolding helped the children to make insightful connections within the text and to their own lives. In order to make read aloud time a more effective learning experience in the classroom, these strategies can be practiced regularly. To continue to help foster early reading skills and maintain an interest in literacy, interactivity, scaffolding and enthusiasm can be implemented during every classroom read aloud time.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Article

Attention to Detail: Preparation of the Environment

Publication: Point of Interest, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 4

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Abstract/Notes: Lunch beverages, Martha Stewart's Living magazine

Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Daily Art Activities on Attention in Elementary Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Attention in children, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The goal of this action research project was to investigate the effects of morning art activities on student focus. The intervention took place over five weeks at a public elementary school. Nineteen students participated in a lower elementary Montessori classroom of six to nine year olds. The qualitative and quantitative data collected were student surveys, behavior tally sheets, student and teacher assessments, field observations and conversations. The evidence showed a relationship between daily art activities and student concentration. The students increased their time on task while writing reflections about their artwork throughout the five-week study. Future research could examine the role of art on students’ social emotional development and how art exploration develops cooperation.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Presentation

Liberty, Discipline and Pedagogy: Mapping Pathways Towards Social and Cultural Independence Through the Regulation of Activity and Attention in a Montessori Classroom

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Abstract/Notes: The term discipline weaves together, through its etymology and use, both learning and regulation, suggesting that one cannot be achieved without the other. It is in this sense, that Dr Maria Montessori applied the term as she designed her distinctive pedagogy during the first half of the twentieth century. Her aim was for children to regulate their activity and their attention through interaction with meticulously designed objects combined with precise language, including the language of educational disciplines. What distinguishes Montessori pedagogy is that children’s liberty is identified as both the means and the end of this regulation. Liberty and discipline were considered by Dr Montessori (1998 [1939], p. 41) to be ‘two faces of the same coin, two faces of the same action’. Montessori’s emphasis on liberty locates her pedagogy in the Enlightenment tradition, but her simultaneous emphasis on discipline, in both senses, reveals an orientation out of step with the tradition of Rousseau, the tradition which remains in the foreground whenever pedagogy is linked with the legacy of the Enlightenment. This paper presents Montessori’s pedagogy of liberty and discipline as one realisation of another, less visible, Enlightenment tradition. This tradition comes into clearer view when human development is perceived as socially, and therefore, semiotically, mediated (Vygotsky 1986 [1934]) and pedagogy is perceived as discipline knowledge embedded in a regulating social order (Bernstein 2000).

Language: English

Presented: University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia: Disciplinarity, Knowledge and Language (Symposium), Dec 2008

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Mindfulness Practices and Activities on Student Attention and Work Engagement in a Multi-age 4th to 6th grade Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to test whether the implementation of mindfulness exercises would increase focus and work engagement of students. This study incorporated breathing and visualization exercises three times a week. The 5-week study involved 44 children between the ages of 9 and 12 years in a private Montessori school in Northern Michigan. Data collection included daily tallies of on and off task behavior, daily observations of work engagement, pre and post questionnaires about mindfulness completed by each child, and oneon- one discussions with each participant. Results showed an increase in the number of students on task and more students engaged in work over time. The pre and post questionnaire showed an increase in the number of students who liked mindfulness exercises and thought they were helpful, but expressed mixed opinions related to statements regarding focus and distraction. Eighty-two percent of students responded that they found mindfulness exercises helpful. Thirtysix percent mentioned the words “focus” or “concentrate” in their descriptions of how the mindfulness exercises were helpful. Eighty percent responded that they would use the mindfulness techniques independently. The data showed a positive correlation between the implementation of mindfulness exercises and focus in children ages 9 to 12. Suggestions for further research include increasing conversations about ways students can practice mindfulness exercises independently and an extended research period.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

Attention School Administrators

Publication: AMI/USA Professional Bulletin, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 5

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Language: English

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