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507 results

Doctoral Dissertation

How Social Emotional Development Skills Gained in High Quality Public School Prekindergarten Impact Kindergarten Academic Readiness

Available from: East Tennessee State University

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Abstract/Notes: Longitudinal research has demonstrated that children’s emotional and social skills are linked to their early academic achievement (Wentzel & Asher, 1995). Children who have difficulty paying attention, following directions, getting along with others, and controlling negative emotions like anger and distress do not do as well in school (Arnokl et al., 1999; McClelland et al., 2000). Academic achievement in the early years of schooling appears to be built on a firm foundation of children’s social emotional skills (Ladd, Kochenderfer, & Coleman, 1997; O’Neil et al., 1997). Higher quality prekindergarten programs are associated with the early years of schooling and more positive academic outcomes in children (Burchinal et al., 2000). Investments in early childhood programs by state and federal governments have been made with a goal of improving school readiness for low income children. These investments are based on findings that show a link between program quality and children’s academic outcomes. Studies of model programs show that intensive early childhood services can improve children’s cognitive, 2 academic, and social skills with gains maintained into adulthood (Burchinal, Kainz, & Cai, in press). The purpose of this study was to create knowledge that indicates the influence of the social emotional skills children gain by completing prekindergarten. Schools in Sevier County, Tennessee that have prekindergarten classrooms in place were chosen for this study because kindergarten is the next experience children will have after pre-k. Kindergarten teachers in the schools chosen were purposefully selected as participants. Kindergarten teachers have the opportunity to make comparisons of differences in academic readiness of students who have completed prekindergarten and the students who have not been in a school environment. Kindergarten teachers may be able to conclude from classroom observation of the 2 groups if there is a difference in academic readiness. Home environments with strong parental involvement were most kindergarten teachers’ first choice for early learning and kindergarten preparation. Teachers realization that a strong home environment is not available to all children encouraged them to appreciate having a high quality public school prekindergarten as an alternative. Kindergarten teachers overall perceptions about the readiness of children who enter their classroom after completing prekindergarten were positive.

Language: English

Published: Johnson City, Tennessee, 2013

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of of Grace and Courtesy Lessons on Independence in Elementary Aged Children

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Independence is a skill that everyone needs to possess in order to function in society (Montessori, 1918). The study was designed to see if Grace and Courtesy lessons would help increase independence skills in elementary children. The study took place in a Montessori classroom of 35 children, aged 6-9 years old. The researcher used tally marks to calculate how often the children asked adults for help with tasks that they already knew how to perform. The researcher also tallied how often the children would perform the task after being reminded one time. Observations were done daily and the observation sheets indicated how many children were not focused on a task and when the concepts in the Grace and Courtesy lessons were being used. The study showed that there was a decrease in asking adults for help and an increase in the use of Grace and Courtesy lessons throughout the research period.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

You Don’t Need to Speak to be Heard: The Effects of Using American Sign Language with Hearing Lower Elementary Montessori Children

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, American Sign Language (ASL), Language acquisition, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Our research introduced the use of ASL signs with hearing elementary children and examined if this intervention affected the noise level produced in the classroom. The project was performed in two Montessori lower elementary classrooms (1st-3rd grade); one at a Maine private Montessori school, with 28 hearing children, and one at a Wisconsin public Montessori school, with 34 hearing children. In Wisconsin the researcher was a teacher in the classroom, in Maine the researcher was not. Data was measured using four tools: a decibel measuring app, observation form, tally sheet, and a structured discussion. In both classrooms, the change in noise level was minimal, decreasing by 2% overall. Qualitative results, however, indicate the project was worthwhile. The children responded positively to instructions given using ASL and their enthusiasm of learning signs justified the intervention. The intervention granted the children opportunities to discuss exceptionalities. We recognized the importance in such conversations and encouraged this dialogue.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in the Montessori Classroom: Introduction

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 263-285

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, Inclusion, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Catherine Nehring Massie provides important contextual information in considering children with attentional challenges. She discusses the prevalence of attentional challenges in today's culture and the contributing factors. She gives a general overview of the spectrum of attentional challenges and some of the indicators in children. Her history of Montessori and work with children facing attentional challenges provides a clearer understanding to the individual details and definitions as it builds upon years of work and observation. Critical to her article and those that follow is the link she draws between concentration (attention) and human development: "Attention lays the foundation for concentrated work--normalization of the child's personality." By partnering Montessori with medical knowledge, fostering focus and attentional development can be better achieved. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Finding the Hook: Montessori Strategies to Support Concentration," October 6-9, 2016, in Columbia, MD.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Some Educational Benefits of Freely Chosen Age Mixing among Children and Adolescents.

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Phi Delta Kappan, vol. 80, no. 7

Pages: 507-512

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Abstract/Notes: Observation of 200 children ages 4 to 19 attending a Massachusetts nongraded alternative school disclosed substantial age mixing. Younger children used older children to develop skills and acquire knowledge. Age mixing encouraged opportunities for creativity, helped match abilities, and fostered older children's sense of responsibility for younger children. (MLH)

Language: English

ISSN: 0031-7217

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effectiveness of a Counseling Program Based on the Use of Montessori Method on Adaptive Environmental Behavior in a Sample of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: Journal of Environmental Science, vol. 49, no. 9

Pages: 181-216

Africa, Children with disabilities, Counseling, Egypt, Middle East, Montessori method of education, North Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The present study aims to identify the effectiveness of a counseling program based on the use of the Montessori method on the environmental adaptive behavior in a sample of children with mild intellectual disabilities, identifying also the differences in the level of behavioral adaptation in a sample of children on the adaptive behavior scale pre/post application of the program. The researchers define a sample of (40) items, applied to a sample consisting of (40) children with mild intellectual disabilities, aged between (10-12) years, selected from boys, divided equally to (20) experimental samples and (20) control samples, from Al-Ghafir Foundation for people with special needs. The researcher has used the (experimental) method and applied the scale of adaptive behavior. The research has come to several results, the most important of which is that there is a statistically significant correlation between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group, regarding the post application of the total adaptive behavior scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the experimental group, regarding the post/ follow up application of the adaptive behavioral scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group regarding the post-application of the total behavior scale, in favor of the experimental group. The research reached a set of recommendations, the most important of which are: the necessity of providing the necessary tools for developing skills for children with disabilities within government institutions, setting a special budget.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jes.2020.206380

ISSN: 1110-0826

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Performance of Montessori and Traditionally Schooled Nursery Children on Social Cognitive Tasks and Memory Problems

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 124-137

Americas, Cognition, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In two independent experiments, the performance of 4-year-old children drawn from Montessori classrooms was compared with that of children attending traditional preschools. It was speculated that the Montessori children might excel in social cognitive reasoning and in memory—both indirect consequences of the cognitive skills targeted by the curriculum. In Experiment 1, there were three social cognitive tasks—referential communication, speech differentiation, and identifying emotions. In Experiment 2, there were two memory problems—recognition of logically related objects, and free recall. There was no evidence of a difference in the level of performance of children from the two types of schools on social cognitive tasks, and both groups recoded messages more effectively to explicit requests from the listener than to implicit ones. For memory, the Montessori children excelled on the recognition problem, but there was no difference between groups on free recall. It was concluded that the Montessori curriculum does influence cognitive development beyond the narrow bounds of the cognitive skills ostensibly taught in the classroom, but the impact is greatest where there is a close relation between the specific concepts learned in class and the skill in question.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/0361-476X(80)90033-8

ISSN: 0361-476X

Report

Montessori Partners Serving All Children: Evaluation Report for 2012–2015

Available from: Development and Training, Inc

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Partners Serving All Children (MPSAC) is a collaborative between the Montessori Center of Minnesota (MCM) and metro-area organizations. The goal of MPSAC is to demonstrate how the Montessori approach, starting with early education, can be viable, effective, culturally responsive, and accessible for all Minnesota children, including low income children from culturally distinct families and communities. Toward that end, MCM commissioned a three-year evaluation of its MPSAC initiative, currently a partnership with four participating community-led schools. This report presents comparative data and findings from that evaluation process, including data and analysis for this third and final year. The MPSAC initiative engaged partners in community-led Montessori schools in a three-year evaluation to assess the progress of children, staff, and schools in the following areas: School structures and quality (classroom environments, professional development, ongoing mentoring, and administrative technical assistance for newly formed schools); Children’s academic, cognitive, social, and physical health; and Successful inclusion and support of parents and community.

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Benefits of Good Shepherd Catechesis Among Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Kenya

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Journal of Religious Education, vol. 66, no. 3

Pages: 225-234

Africa, Children with disabilities, East Africa, Inclusive education, Kenya, Learning disabilities, People with disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Since Martin Luther, religious education has largely been identified with catechism that used question and answer method, particularly in the Catholic church. For a person with intellectual disability, this offers a grave difficulty in religious formation. Could there be alternatives? The present study aimed at exploring the benefits of Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (CGS) for children living with intellectual disabilities. The participants were 23 children and nine care-givers in a Catholic context in Kenya. Observation guides and interviews were used to collect data that showed that children with intellectual disabilities had the ability to spontaneously relate with the spiritual world, and in some cases, with Jesus. The findings confirmed that the CGS offers children with special needs the space, tools, and time to get in touch with the Divine through witnessing to the narrative of the Word.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s40839-018-0069-5

ISSN: 2199-4625

Article

Honoring Montessori's Work with Children with Special Needs

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 9

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities, Special education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In the report summarizing the results, Jackie Cossentino, MLC member, indicated that the area of professional development most requested by teachers is working with children with learning differences, including children on the autism spectrum.(Other areas of professional development Montessori teachers expressed a need for were reading and writing, observation, math, science, parent/community engagement, nature/ environment, peace education, social studies, Grace and Courtesy, Practical Life, Sensorial, art, gifted students, English-language learners, serving lowincome students, and state standards.) The Special Education Endorsement Task Force is preparing a survey, expanding upon the MLC survey, that we hope will provide more information regarding perceptions among our AMS community of 14,000 members about working with students with special needs in our Montessori classrooms as well as professional-development needs related to special education.The area of professional development most requested by Montessori teachers is working with children with learning differences, including children on the autism spectrum.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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