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1639 results

Article

The Nature of Professions: Where Is Early Childhood Education?

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 31–35

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Formation of Mind: Language, Learning and Logic in Early Childhood

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 2003, no. 4

Pages: 25–32

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Supporting Conflict Resolution in an Early Childhood Montessori Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The study aimed to determine in what way daily grace and courtesy lessons and more thoughtful, consistent adult intervention would affect children’s responses to conflict in an early childhood Montessori environment. There were 17 participants between the ages of three and six in an independent Montessori school in Northern Michigan. The researcher gave the children daily lessons on aspects of conflict resolution, used a scripted intervention strategy during conflict, and implemented three guided discussions throughout the course of the study. The researcher collected data by tallying number of conflicts, recording responses during guided discussions, recording details and language of each conflict, and reflecting in a journal. The study revealed that children knew many conflict resolution strategies before beginning the intervention, but they used more language from the lessons after the intervention and solved more conflicts independently. The number of conflicts decreased overall but did not consistency decline. The data shows further research is needed to support children to calm down before attempting to apply conflict resolution strategies and to determine the most effective waiting time before teacher intervention.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Article

A Comparative Study of Sensory Training in Early Childhood Education Programs

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1990, no. 1

Pages: 16–20

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

The Child's Mind–The Child's Brain: Implications for Early Childhood Educators

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 1, 11–12

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Effectiveness of Preschool in Preparing Students for Kindergarten: A Comparison of Early Childhood Curriculum Models

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education has been shown to positively impact future academic performance, as well as social and emotional development. With ever-increasing demands being placed on children's academic performances, school readiness has become a key component of academic success. The purpose of this quantitative causal-comparative study was to examine the effectiveness of different early childhood curriculum models in preparing children for kindergarten, and to investigate whether one early childhood curriculum model better prepares students than another. The theoretical framework for the study is based on the developmental constructivist theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, and Dewey. Kindergarten teachers assessed school readiness by administering the Kindergarten Observation Form. Each student had matriculated from either Montessori, High/Scope, or Reggio Emilia programs or early childhood programs without an identified curriculum model. Kindergarten teachers rated students on 24 items related to areas of cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical development. ANOVA and post-hoc tests revealed that students matriculating from programs without an identified curriculum model scored significantly better than their counterparts, F (3,122) = 5.33, p = .002. Implications for social change include improved kindergarten readiness on the part of students, increased awareness by educators as to best practices in early childhood education, and, a move towards understanding the types of environments in which children learn best.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2012

Doctoral Dissertation

Universal Interest Levels in Early Childhood: Montessori's Theory of Sensitive Periods

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Although a little dated in terms of related research, Haines, dissertation provides a thorough introduction to the topic as well as substantially confirming the accuracy of the ages assigned to each period by Maria Montessori.

Language: English

Published: Edwardsville, Illinois, 1997

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

A Theoretical Design of Rational Autonomy: Integrating Elementary and Early Childhood Teacher Education Through a Contemporary Derivation from Maria Montessori's Social Cognitive Field Paradigm

Available from: Oregon State University

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Trainings

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Abstract/Notes: The individual through earliest recorded history reveals contradictory views of the human life-span. "Am I a free and unique individual, able to make choices and decide my own destiny?, or, "Am I only a victim of circumstance, a speck of dust in the universe's whirlwind of fate?" Each view is recognized in education and psychology, but the latter outlook is often prominent in schools which discourage decision making. Throughout the life-span, however, the individual must make choices. Allowing the young student to progress on the road to autonomy, requires a new educational outlook. How might teacher education focus on this new perspective? Rational Autonomy (RA) is an original conceptualization of the psychological foundations for a learning-teaching theory of practice; one which promotes autonomy and reasonable decision making in children and adults. Its purpose is to provide a framework for the development of an autonomous educator who may conceptualize the interaction between the dichotomies of autonomy and rationality. These values are imbedded within the leitmotif of liberty and freedom; individuality and socialization; creativity and cooperation all natural tensions within a democracy and a democratic classroom. Cognitive psychologies today advance a view reflecting an autonomous individual who is interactive, purposeful and capable of conscious decision making. Montessori (1870-1952) recognized these traits as inherent in most children. Viewing autonomy and reason as the individual's means to full cognitive and personality development, she proposed an expansive educational psychology which would anticipate this view in cognitive psychology. Until now, few psychological definitions were available to define Montessori's theories. Thus, this thesis defines existent psychology as providing a "Social Cognitive Field" frame in which to define her theories and derive a new concept. The concept of Rational Autonomy incorporates psychological principles from human development, social, personality and learning theories. Constructs are demonstrated by interaction models of the child, family and educator. These are exemplified in a school program through a site and case study. Elementary and early childhood teacher education extends the Design into a life-span theory. The mentor-teacher relationship, curricular implications, educator group facilitation and university aims are included in the RA Design.

Language: English

Published: Corvallis, Oregon, 1989

Doctoral Dissertation

Everyday Spirituality: Supporting the Spiritual Experience of Young Children in Three Early Childhood Educational Settings

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Child development, Comparative education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania, Spirituality, Waldorf schools

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Abstract/Notes: The focus of this research is the spiritual experience of young children in early childhood educational settings. Spirituality is included in the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki, but is a relatively unarticulated aspect of educational practice. In order to find out how spirituality is supported in early childhood educational contexts this qualitative case study research took place in three early childhood settings: a Montessori casa, a private preschool and a Steiner (Waldorf) kindergarten. The methods used in the research included participant observation, interviews and focus groups. The teachers were asked to make a video about spirituality to reflect their own context and photographs were taken in each setting. The metaphor of spiritual landscape is used in this research. In this landscape everyday experience merged with the spiritual to form the concept of everyday spirituality. The cultural theories of everyday life supported a realisation that ordinary daily activity can become wonderful and mysterious when the spiritual dimension is realised. The themes that emerged from analysis of the case studies are conceptualised as transformative aspects of learning and relationships. They are aspects of everyday spirituality identified as spiritual withness; spiritual inbetweenness; and the spiritually elsewhere. Representing spiritual experience is challenging. The thesis is written in narrative form and contains core narratives as prose and poems. Using writing as a means of discovery made communicating spirituality through the medium of words a possibility. Spirituality is proposed to be an inclusive concept that affirms a sense of connection and this thesis found that all pedagogical practices in early childhood settings have the potential to include a spiritual aspect. In Aotearoa New Zealand many children lead their everyday lives in the context of an early childhood environment that includes teachers and parents as part of that community. This thesis argues that when everyday spirituality permeates early childhood contexts that all aspects of the curriculum are realised and the spiritual experience of everyone connected to that setting is supported.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2007

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori as Metonymy: How Montessori Early Childhood Teachers Approach Race in the Classroom

Available from: Bethel University - Institutional Repository

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how Montessori early childhood teachers approach teaching about race and racial bias in their classrooms. Twenty-four Montessori early childhood teachers participated in an open-ended survey, and five teachers of those 24 participated in a data-informed online semi-structured interview. The interviewees received an infographic with narrative and graphics in which themes of the survey were detailed, a form of graphic elicitation. Surveys and interviews were coded and analyzed for themes. Themes were verified through independent coding by an independent analyst. Several themes that emerged from the surveys and interviews indicated that 1) Montessori early childhood teachers generally hold a race neutral view of early childhood, 2) Most Montessori early childhood teachers believe that young children do not have bias, 3) Most Montessori early childhood teachers believe that teaching about race and racial bias is implicit in their Montessori training on culture, peace, and respect, 4) Montessori early childhood teachers did not receive explicit instruction from their Montessori training or education programs regarding teaching about race and racial bias, and 5) Most Montessori early childhood teachers supplemented their training with books or developed lessons outside of those obtained in training to teach about race. Reasons for participants' beliefs around race, racial bias, prejudice, young children, and teaching are discussed, as well as the implications of these outcomes. The results of this study were used to develop recommendations for Montessori teachers, Montessori teacher education programs, and national Montessori organizations. Recommendations for further research suggest that a broad examination of demographics along with data on how Montessori teachers are teaching about race and racial bias may yield pertinent information that could further guide educators and trainers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

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