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740 results

Article

Where Did It Come From? Introducing Students to Material Science

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 17

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Junior High, Giant Questions: When Programs Admit Unprepared Students, What Does the Conscientious Teacher Do?

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 10, no. 4

Pages: 11

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Master's Thesis (M. Ed.)

Sight Word Practice in a Lower Elementary Classroom:The Impact of Daily Sight Word Practice on Student’s Acquisition

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to look at how effective daily sight word practice was the acquisition of sight words. The study took place in a public charter Montessori school located in the Midwest. The classroom had 25 students ranging from first through third grade. Researchers assessed the daily sight word practice of 8 first graders. The researchers also administered two surveys which were given to the students and families. Each student was assessed using flashcards on the first day of each week and they were then given a list of those five words each week. They were also assessed on the last day of the week using the same flashcards from the first assessment. After six weeks of new words assessed, the students were then measured on 14 of the sight words within sentences. Overall, there was a positive learning experience for all six weeks. The parent survey focused on their knowledge of sight words and how they work on reading and sight words at home. The study shows daily practice of sight words does in fact help with the acquisition. Many parents know what sight words are but would like to learn new strategies about how to teach sight words to their child. The effects of daily practice helps strengthen the students reading skills and help create fluency.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2023

Master's Thesis

The Impact of Cognitively Guided Instruction on Students’ Mathematical Mindsets

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to analyze the impact of an inquiry-based word problem-solving framework, known as Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI), on students’ mathematical mindsets in an early elementary Montessori classroom. Students received one word problem-solving lesson per week over a six-week period. Students completed a pre-intervention and post-intervention mathematical mindset rubric, as well as CGI assessment. Both qualitative and quantitative results show that students had an increase in their variety of word problem-solving strategies, were able to solve word problems more accurately, and showed increased levels in self-efficacy, perception, and affinity towards math. Based on these results, CGI could be utilized as a supplementary instructional method to build students’ mathematical mindsets and word problem-solving skills in Montessori classrooms. Further research is needed to know if these results hold true for other student populations.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2023

Master's Thesis

The Impact of Geometry Montessori Education on Students’ Skills and Mindsets

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education has gained recognition due to its long-lasting positive effects on students. However, no studies have targeted its effectiveness on geometry education. This action research project investigated the impact and effectiveness of switching a non-sequential geometry curriculum with the Montessori method and curriculum on students' attitudes and geometrical skills. During six weeks, a population of 16 grade 6 students received weekly lessons that followed the Montessori method and curriculum while their skills were measured and compared against the British Columbia (BC) geometry curriculum. Students were interviewed before and after the intervention to track changes in their learning attitudes. Teacher observations and tracking of student work complemented the data. Results showed that the intervention had an overall positive impact, with a 13% increase in student's confidence in their geometrical skills. Likewise, 93% of students reported having an easier time understanding abstract concepts when previously demonstrated with Montessori materials. Also, 100% reported that geometric concepts became more evident in a curriculum with logically sequenced lessons, and 53% reported increased joy related to geometry learning. In sum, it took students only six weeks of following the Montessori curriculum to master 66% of the BC outcomes for geometry, on average, a percentage that makes sense considering the reduced geometrical content and gaps found in the BC Curriculum during the present work's literature review. Therefore, replacing the BC Curriculum with the Montessori method and curriculum would benefit students. Future similar research focused on larger, possibly younger, populations would further enrich the literature.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2023

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Middle School Students’ Motivation and Quality of Experience: A Comparison of Montessori and Traditional School Environments

Available from: University of Chicago Press

Publication: American Journal of Education, vol. 111, no. 3

Pages: 341-371

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Motivation (Psychology)

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared the motivation and quality of experience of demographically matched students from Montessori and traditional middle school programs. Approximately 290 students responded to the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) and filled out questionnaires. Multivariate analyses showed that the Montessori students reported greater affect, potency (i.e., feeling energetic), intrinsic motivation, flow experience, and undivided interest (i.e., the combination of high intrinsic motivation and high salience or importance) while engaged in academic activities at school. The traditional middle school students reported higher salience while doing academic work; however, such responses were often accompanied by low intrinsic motivation. When engaged in informal, nonacademic activities, the students in both school contexts reported similar experiences. These results are discussed in terms of current thought on motivation in education and middle school reform.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/428885

ISSN: 0195-6744, 1549-6511

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Method, Aboriginal Students and Linnaean Zoology Taxonomy Teaching: Three-Staged Lesson

Available from: Cambridge University Press

Publication: The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, vol. 50, no. 1

Pages: 116-126

Action research, Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Oceania, Zoology education

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Abstract/Notes: This research article addresses an important issue related to how teachers can support Aboriginal secondary school students' learning of science. Drawn from a larger project that investigated the study of vertebrates using Queensland Indigenous knowledges and Montessori Linnaean materials to engage Indigenous secondary school students, this article focuses on the three-staged lessons from that study. Using an Action Research approach and working with participants from one secondary high school in regional Queensland with a high Indigenous population, there were several important findings. First, the materials and the three-staged lessons generated interest in learning Eurocentric science knowledge. Second, repetition, freedom and unhurried inclusion of foreign science knowledges strengthened students' Aboriginal personal identity as well as identities as science learners. Third, privileging of local Aboriginal knowledge and animal language gave rise to meaningful and contextualised Linnaean lessons and culturally responsive practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1017/jie.2019.10

ISSN: 1326-0111, 2049-7784

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Improving Creative Ability of Base of Pyramid (BOP) Students in India

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Thinking Skills and Creativity, vol. 36

Pages: 100652

Action research, Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: A study was undertaken to investigate how to prepare Base of Pyramid (BOP) children in India for creativity. The quasi-experiment study involved seventy 5th grade BOP students from two municipality schools in Mumbai, India. The training group students were given Design Thinking training spread over two action research cycles, while the control group received no intervention. The present study reports on findings from the second action research cycle during which the training group received training on divergent thinking skills—skills required for Design Thinking. The data was collected using classroom worksheets and intervention test sheets, and the objective was to find answers to how ideation took place during creative work and whether divergent thinking skills—as a part of Design Thinking training—helped in improving creative ability. The quantitative analysis of The Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT) inspired intervention test sheets indicated an overall significant difference in creative ability indicator scores of students who received intervention over those who did not. Furthermore, the significant difference was found for figural tasks but not for verbal tasks. The present study also showed how a mixed-method analysis can be useful for capturing socio-cultural elements, measuring relevant idea generation and identifying the need for different creative confidence-building strategies. The study identified language as a barrier for idea expression in the case of BOP students for whom language of instruction at school was different from language spoken at home. The study recommended socio-techno entrepreneurs to use this challenge as an opportunity for becoming stakeholders in creativity skilling for BOP students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.tsc.2020.100652

ISSN: 1871-1871

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Communication Board as a Montessori Apparatus in Teaching Mathematics to Autism Students

Available from: Ukrainian Journal of Educational Studies and Information Technology

Publication: Ukrainian Journal of Educational Studies and Information Technology, vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 25-31

Asia, Australasia, Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Indonesia, Mathematics education, Montessori materials, People with disabilities, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The research of mathematics teachers and instructors is still focused on normal students. Students with special needs are often ruled out. In fact, they also need to learn mathematics. Mathematics is a very basic subject and must be mastered by everyone, including students with special needs. This research is intended to apply mathematics learning to autism students by using communication boards as a Montessori apparatus. Communication is chosen because autistic students have a visual learning style. Furthermore, the learning method is done with Montessori because it takes the concept of learning with the environment, in accordance with the main purpose of learning for autism students to be able to live independently and be empowered in the community. The study used the descriptive qualitative method. According to the research results several Montessori apparatuses have been chosen used including visual schedules, visuals to structure the environment, visual scripts, a visual rule reminder, the visual task analysis, and a choice board.

Language: English

DOI: 10.32919/uesit.2019.03.03

ISSN: 2521-1234

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Learning from Students, Learning from Music: Cognitive Development in Early Childhood Reflected through Music-Perceptual Tasks

Available from: Rider University

Publication: Visions of Research in Music Education, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 1-21

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate young children’s perception of melodic construction in hope of finding clues about their broader cognitive development in nonmusical domains. Following Jeanne Bamberger’s example of musical-perceptual tasks with Montessori bells, four children aged three to six were presented with a melodic construction task and asked to create a representation of their work. Analysis of data revealed common themes with varied results of (a) eagerness or hesitancy to participate, (b) whether bells were moved or played, (c) exploration of bells, (d) internalization of rhythm, (e) cognitive readiness for melodic construction, and (f) role of visual representation. No cross-case findings could be drawn about broader cognitive development, however specific characteristics of the children and their approach to the melodic construction task are presented. Recommendations for further study center on potential clues a melodic construction task could provide about language construction in individual children.

Language: English

ISSN: 1938-2065

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