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253 results

Report

The Effects of Multiage Grouping on Achievement and Self-Concept

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Abstract/Notes: The effects of multi-age grouping on achievement and self-concept were studied. The achievement variables examined were reading and mathematics achievement as measured by the Stanford Achievement Tests. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale was used to measure self-concept. The groups studied consisted of single-age and multi-age classrooms of children in grades one through five. No significant differences were found between children in multi-age and single-age classrooms on any of the achievement measures. The multi-age classrooms had significantly higher mean scores on one of the six factors in the self-concept scale--happiness and satisfaction. The multi-age classrooms had slightly but consistently higher mean scores on the other five factor scores and on the total self-concept score but the differences were not significant. (Author)

Language: English

Published: Cortland, New York, Apr 1979

Conference Paper

The Effects of Multiage Grouping on Verbal Interaction, Achievement and Self-Concept

Annual Conference of the American Association of School Administrators (112th, Anaheim, California, February 15-18, 1980)

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Abstract/Notes: Two studies were conducted on the effects of multiage classrooms. The first study investigated verbal interaction among children of different age groups and student-teacher interaction in multiage classrooms. Existing multiage classrooms in various settings were observed and information was recorded on the ages of the children initiating and receiving each interaction, the number of children in each age group who initiated interactions to the teacher, and the number of children in each age group who were present in the classroom. Interactions were classified as dominant, submissive, or neutral. Results indicate: (1) older children tended to initiate proportionately more interactions when three ages were grouped together, but not when only two ages were grouped together; (2) children of one age did not dominate the teacher's attention; (3) interaction within age groups was high and interaction between age groups was low when three age groups were present, but not when two age groups

Language: English

Published: Arlington, Virginia: American Association of School Administrators, Feb 1980

Article

The Maria Montessori Lifetime Achievement Award

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 13

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Abstract/Notes: Speeches on presentation and acceptance of MACTE award to Rambusch, October 1994

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Achievement and Self-Concept in Multiage Classrooms

Publication: Educational Research Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 69-75

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Elementary education, Language arts, Mathematics education - Achievement, Nongraded schools, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, Self-perception, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Effects of multiage grouping on achievement and self-concept were explored. No significant differences were found between children in multiage and single-age classrooms on any of the achievement measures. Multiage classrooms had higher mean scores on one of the six factors of the self-concept scale, Happiness and Satisfaction.

Language: English

ISSN: 0196-5042

Article

Imperfect Achievements for Montessori Accreditation

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 9, no. 6

Pages: 1, 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Early Childhood Education in India: History, Trends, Issues, and Achievements

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 24, no. 1

Pages: 11-16

India, South

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Abstract/Notes: The changes in the social and economic structure of India have intensified the need for universal early childhood education. The formidable challenges before the Indian Government are: to provide high quality early childhood education programs; to preserve indigenous practices such as multilinguality, family/community involvement, participation of older children as caretakers of their younger siblings; and to provide early childhood education to all children despite serious financial constraints. This article presents a brief overview of the traditional childrearing practices in India, chronicles government initiatives in early childhood education, describes the range of programs available in India, and identifies goals that will shape the future of early childhood programs in India.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF02430544

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Peer Effects on Children's Language Achievement During Pre-Kindergarten

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Child Development, vol. 80, no. 3

Pages: 686-702

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01291.x

ISSN: 0009-3920, 1467-8624

Article

Now We Have Some Ideas: Achievement Tests and Self-Esteem in Montessori School Graduates

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 4–7

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Learning about the Brain Improves Achievement

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 26, no. 2

Pages: 5, 12

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

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