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565 results

Article

"To Be Strict on Your Own”: Black and Latinx Parents Evaluate Discipline in Urban Choice Schools

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Educational Research Journal, vol. 56, no. 5

Pages: 1896-1929

African American community, African Americans, Latin American community, Public Montessori, Montessori schools, Public Montessori, School choice

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Abstract/Notes: The proliferation of urban “no-excuses” charter schools has been justified by arguing that Black and Latinx parents want strict discipline. In this article, we examine what discipline means to Black and Latinx families at two popular choice options: a no-excuses charter and two public Montessori magnets. We found that parents viewed discipline as more than rule-following, valuing also self-discipline and academic discipline. While no-excuses parents supported an orderly environment, many found the discipline restrictive. Parents in the Montessori schools, by contrast, praised student autonomy but questioned whether the freedom was preparing their students academically. Our findings reveal a gap between what Black and Latinx parents want and what choice schools and local school choice markets have on offer.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/0002831219831972

ISSN: 0002-8312, 1935-1011

Book

Options in Public Education: A Source Document

Educational change

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Abstract/Notes: In this booklet, options (alternatives) for education in the Chicago Public Schools are discussed. Options described are of four types, all focusing on the learning of basic skills: (1) instruction-based, such as Montessori and open schools; (2) curriculum-based, such as magnet schools, academies, environmental schools and multicultural schools; (3) administrative-based, such as mini-schools; and (4) facility and resource based, such as academic interest centers and career development centers. Planning, development and implementation stages are outlined. Suggestions are made about financing and administrating alternatives and relating them to neighborhood schools, desegregation and permissive transfer. The new directions in educational options, the development of process models for options and leadership roles necessary to options development as implemented in the Chicago Public Schools are outlined. Appendices include policy statements on options planning, funding approval, methods of teacher self-assessment, and a glossary defining important terms in alternative education programs. (WI)

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois: National Clearinghouse for Options in Public Education, Chicago Public Schools, 1977

Article

Pedagogical Knowledge for Teaching Mathematics in Montessori Schools

Available from: International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education

Publication: International Electronic Journal of Mathematics Education, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: Article em0646

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Abstract/Notes: Teacher knowledge needed for teaching is widely studied to characterize its key categories. We report findings from a study on teachers’ knowledge for mathematics in the Montessori schools. In Montessori accredited schools, teachers learn to teach mathematics in ways different from the teachers themselves experienced in non-Montessori schools. We ask: What knowledge do teachers learn? and how do they continue to refine this knowledge in teaching in classrooms? We draw from a teacher knowledge framework based on cross-national studies to interpret mixed data from a case study. We aim to inform research on teacher characteristics needed for consistent implementation of instructional reform. Major findings from this study are that for K-6 Montessori teachers to thrive in teaching mathematics in Montessori classrooms, they need teacher knowledge on Montessori materials, on lesson and the presentation of content according to Montessori’s philosophy and pedagogy; as well as on the process of independently understanding concepts to be presented. The findings contribute to further theorizing on teacher knowledge which has implications is designed to teacher training opportunities in three subcategories; namely teaching, learning, and professional competence knowledge.

Language: English

DOI: 10.29333/iejme/11005

ISSN: 1306-3030

Report

Alternatives in Education: An Exploration of Learner-Centered, Progressive, and Holistic Education

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a database of over 500 resources, this paper explores the educational alternatives that exist today between the cracks of mainstream education and culture. It presents information about the growing numbers of schools and education centers that call themselves learner-centered, progressive, and/or holistic. Sources of data for this summary report also include over 3 years of informal interviews with and observations of people at alternative schools. The paper begins by examining terminology issues, discussing qualities for distinguishing educational alternatives, and describing eight types of schools (democratic and free schools, folk education, Quaker schools, homeschooling/unschooling/deschooling, Krishnamurti schools, Montessori schools, open schools, and Waldorf schools). It also presents frameworks for education (maps for understanding the territories of alternatives), and it discusses the three orientations of a competency based education: transaction (progressive), self-directed (learner-centered), and transformation (holistic). After looking at political issues around school choice which could impact the growth of the various philosophical alternatives, the paper concludes that in a society where issues of pluralism and diversity are valued as part of creating a more sustainable world and just democracy, the diversity of philosophical perspectives in education needs to be acknowledged. (Contains 41 references.) (SM)

Language: English

Published: New Orleans, Louisiana, 2002

Article

An Excerpt from Diverse Families, Desirable Schools: Public Montessori in the Era of School Choice

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 55

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In a Boston Globe Sunday Magazine feature, the school was described as a "a scrubbed oasis," in a neighborhood of vacant lots and empty buildings, overseen by Gadpaille, "an angel priestess in red oxfords and a blue smock." Though she started her teaching career at private, predominantly White Montessori schools, including Rambusch's Whitby School, and as the founding director of Lexington Montessori School, Gadpaille's Montessori Family Center was designed for Roxbury's working-class Black families, offering full-day year-round childcare with half of the children attending tuition free through Head Start funding. Gadpaille envisioned a community of 150 Black-owned homes centered around a Montessori school serving ages birth to 18, and she recruited famed architect R. Buckminster Fuller, noted for his space-age geodesic domes, who skipped part of his Harvard reunion to volunteer the design.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

An Exploration of the Experience of Teachers in Facilitating Meta-Learning Among Students in Christian Montessori Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This basic qualitative research records the author’s findings from the one-on-one in-depth personal interviews with twenty-three teachers, trainers, and administrators working for the Christian Montessori schools. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences of the teachers in facilitating meta-learning, the how-to-learn and the why-to-learn, among students in the Christian Montessori schools. The findings are as follows: First, both the Montessorian training and the Christian spiritual preparation of the teachers in the Christian Montessori schools enables them to effectively facilitate both the how-to-learn and the why-to-learn meta-learning, which endorses their claim that they are the true heir of the original Montessori method; second, the teachers’ most meaningful way of facilitating meta-learning is students’ receiving spontaneous training through the teachers’ respectful scaffolding; third, the Christian Montessori school model is an integrated and viable system for educational reform pursuing both the how-to-learn and the why-to-learn at the same time.

Language: English

Published: Deerfield, Illinois, 2020

Article

Philosophically-Based Alternatives in Education: An Exploration of Learner-Centered, Progressive, and Holistic Education

Publication: Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 17-27

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a database of over 500 resources, this paper explores the educational alternatives that exist today between the cracks of mainstream education and culture. It presents information about the growing numbers of schools and education centers that call themselves learner-centered, progressive, and/or holistic. Sources of data for this summary report also include over 3 years of informal interviews with and observations of people at alternative schools. The paper begins by examining terminology issues, discussing qualities for distinguishing educational alternatives, and describing eight types of schools (democratic and free schools, folk education, Quaker schools, homeschooling/unschooling/deschooling, Krishnamurti schools, Montessori schools, open schools, and Waldorf schools). It also presents frameworks for education (maps for understanding the territories of alternatives), and it discusses the three orientations of a competency based education: transaction (progressive), self-directed (learner-centered), and transformation (holistic). After looking at political issues around school choice which could impact the growth of the various philosophical alternatives, the paper concludes that in a society where issues of pluralism and diversity are valued as part of creating a more sustainable world and just democracy, the diversity of philosophical perspectives in education needs to be acknowledged. (Contains 41 references.) (SM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1094-3838, 2158-8414

Article

Individual Development Plans From a Critical Didactic Perspective: Focusing on Montessori- and Reggio Emilia-Profiled Preschools in Sweden

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Journal of Early Childhood Research, vol. 9, no. 3

Pages: 247-261

Comparative education, Europe, Northern Europe, Scandinavia, Sweden

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Abstract/Notes: Individual development plans, which are sometimes designed as ‘agreements — contracts’, can be considered the most rigid type of regulation on the individual level in the history of preschool in Sweden. Today we speak about a deregulated school. This regulation seems to have changed its character, gradually drifting from school regulation to individual and self-regulation. The study aims to map and discuss the variation of content and positions for children in the documentation from all preschools in a municipality in the south of Sweden. Documentation and individual development plans (IDP) are studied from preschools with different pedagogical profiles. Materials from Montessori- and Reggio Emilia-inspired preschools are focused on. A critical didactic perspective refers to a discussion and critical scrutiny of the structure of contents, assessment and position of children in different types of documentation. The perspective leads to questions such as: how is content constructed, and what governs the choice of content in IDPs and documentation at the institutional and individual levels? How is content related to pedagogical profile? What identities and positions are formulated for children in relation to various contents and profiles? The empirical data in the study were gathered in 2008 and comprises text in the form of governing documents on different levels: as municipal guidelines, profile descriptions on the municipality’s websites and IDP forms. Tentative results show a variation with both similar and diverse constructions of contents and positions related to pedagogical profiles.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1476718X10389148

ISSN: 1476-718X

Conference Paper

Inside the One Room Schoolhouse: A Look at Nongraded Classrooms from the Inside Out

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (Memphis, Tennessee, November, 12-14, 1997)

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined nongraded, multi-age elementary classrooms from the perspective of involved principals, teachers, and parents. Data came from field notes taken at on-site observations and from in-person structured and unstructured interviews with principals and teachers. The schools were all located in a small urban town in north central Mississippi. The study found that the schools set up and operated the nongraded classrooms in different ways. The classrooms operated according to the philosophy of the teachers in charge of the classes under the guidance of the principal; each classroom was different from the next. The schools that experienced the most success were those in which the teachers did not feel threatened and were given the freedom to operate as they deemed appropriate. Some parent concerns included mixing the sexes, having siblings in the same room, giving up traditional grading and assessment, and possibly short-changing math. Keeping parents continually informed

Language: English

Article

Nongraded and Mixed-Age Grouping in Early Childhood Programs

Available from: ERIC

Publication: ERIC Digest

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: A confusing variety of terms is used in discussions of age grouping practices. This digest examines terms that have important implications for teaching and the curriculum. The terms "nongraded" and "ungraded" typically refer to grouping children in classes without grade-level designations and with more than a 1-year age span. The term "combined classes" refers to the inclusion of more than one grade level in a classroom. The term "continuous progress" generally implies that children remain with their classroom peers in an age cohort regardless of whether they have met prespecified grade-level achievement expectations. The terms "mixed-age" and "multi-age grouping" refer to grouping children so that the age span of the class is greater than 1 year, as in the nongraded or ungraded approach. These terms are used to emphasize the goal of using teaching practices that maximize the benefits of cooperation among children of various ages. The distinctions between the grouping practices have

Language: English

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