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1068 results

Article

Observations on Sara's First Eight Months by Her Mother

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 15, no. 3

Pages: 50–57

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

The Observation Scientist

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 57-99

Child development, Early childhood education, Molly O'Shaughnessy - Writings, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Teachers, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Observation (Educational method), Teacher-student relationships, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: Once the reasons for habitual observation in the classroom have been established, and the intent to observe has been settled, the practical details of observation must be organized. In this article, O'Shaughnessy gives us a model for the implementation of observation. She thoroughly reviews Montessori's work curves and how they can be used to show the development of the child through four stages of concentration. O'Shaughnessy discusses how these work curves can be used to aid the practice of observation, and she has embedded case studies to clarify her points. She offers practical tools and tips for use in recording observation and points of awareness, including the documentation for the observation of errors in order to understand the obstacles a child is encountering. Constant attention must be given to the point of contact between the child and the environment so that we are ever conscious of our role in facilitating that most important interaction that will allow the child's potential to unfold.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Methods Evolved by Observation

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 359-365

Child development, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Observation (Educational method)

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about often. She says to look at the child and a quiet mountain that spews out "fire, smoke and unknown substances" from the interior will be seen. The explosion into writing is compared to a volcano with its dramatic description evoking a mystique of what is inside the child, coming from a place no one can find except through observation. The freedom of activity in the prepared environment is enriching to the child's knowledge and engages the development of character as it supports the moral education of the child. [Reprinted from "Education for a New World" (1946). Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company (2014): 53-58.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

Observation

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Language: English

Published: Calcutta, India: [s.n.], 1965

Article

Interview with Hilla Patell on the History of the Observation

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 43-55

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: In this interview conducted at the NAMTA conference, "Observation: The Key to Unlocking the Child's Potential", Molly O'Shaughnessy discusses the history of observation with Hilla Patell. Patell shares stories of the people who were instrumental in creating a culture of observation as an ongoing discipline to be practiced. She goes on to talk about some of the keys to understanding and practicing observation, including the child's concentration, the need to rid ourselves of preconceptions, and how to look for obstacles that impede a child's development. She tells us that as observers we must stay in the present and have "faith in the human spirit." [Paper presented at the "Observation: The Key to Unlocking the Child's Potential," North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) Conference, Part 1 (Denver, CO, November 5-8, 2015).]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Observation: A Practice That Must Be Practiced

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 101-131

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Karey Lontz's article on learning how to "dominate by observation" (to master the practice of observation so as to use it most effectively for the benefit of the children) takes us from a general to specific understanding of observation. She begins with a look at the importance of observation in human history and in the history of Montessori. She discusses different types of observation: direct, indirect, and self-observation. She concludes by offering tips on helpful observation tools such as record keeping, lesson planning, and photo journaling. [Paper presented at the "Observation: The Key to Unlocking the Child's Potential," North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) Conference, Part 1 (Denver, CO, November 5-8, 2015).]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Joyful Engagement: A Specific Lens for Observation in Montessori Primary and Elementary Environments

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 34, no. 2

Pages: 4-22

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Paula Leigh-Doyle uses "joyful engagement" as the main criterion for a child's success in the Montessori classroom. She defines joyful engagement in terms of Montessori's solid foundation of mind-body integration, suggesting "ways to slip port the child's nervous system (usually through movement) so that they may feel grounded, integrated, and able to process information to the fullest of their potential." For both the primary and elementary levels, she offers ways to evaluate any proposed intervention in light of whether it is compatible with the Montessori goals of joyful engagement and increasing independence. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Observation

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 229-247

Classroom environments, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Observation (Educational method), Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove obstacles." To this end, she outlines a technique for practicing observation. She also lists the different aspects to be observed in the classroom and discusses points of awareness in the observation of each. [Reprinted with permission from "AMI Communications" 1 (1987): 2-11.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Observations

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 199-213

Albert Max Joosten - Writings, Child development, Montessori method of education, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Observation (Educational method)

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Abstract/Notes: Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our eye and tips for recording observations. He includes a "Guide for Psychological Observation" from "The Advanced Montessori Method, Volume 1" and ends with the message of observation as a key to the improvement of humanity through our work with the child. [Reprinted from "Around the Child 3" (1958): 23-31.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Observation

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 249-257

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to observe through a profound respect for our work and the ability to observe through practical knowledge. She outlines the attributes needed to become an effective observer and addresses the steps to be observed in the child as he progresses toward inner discipline. She finally helps us consider how to find time for observation in a busy day. [Paper presented at the "Observation: The Key to Unlocking the Child's Potential," North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) Conference, Part 2 (Denver, CO, November 5-8, 2015).]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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