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165 results

Book

Education in Australia: A Comparative Study of the Educational Systems of the Six Australian States

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Oceania

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Language: English

Published: London: Macmillan and Co., 1927

Article

The Development of Montessori Schools: A Comparative Analysis

Publication: MoRE Montessori Research Europe newsletter

Pages: 7

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: MORE Abstracts 2003 Reconstructing and accounting for the Montessori movement in the world and of the spread of the Montessori method in school systems of various countries is a difficult task and is practically impossible here. However, we cannot ignore the very widespread dissemination that this educational model has had, and continues to have, in virtually all five continents: Europe, America (North, Central and South), Asia, Africa and Oceania. The aim of this contribution is to present, through a quantitative kind of analysis, an initial up-todate picture of the current state of things in some European countries in order to obtain, in particular, useful statistical data for a comparison with today’s state of development of Montessori schools in Italy. Starting from an overall glance of Europe, it was decided to select those European countries which, from an initial examination, had already provided for a systemisation of certain data on Montessori schools and the public availability of the data. For each country, a brief history of the Montessori movement will be given at the start. As regards the Italian situation, instead, contacts have been made with the Ministry of Education and with regional education offices responsible for collecting as analytical and up-to-date data as possible on the state of the art in each region. This contribution does not intend to solicit an evaluation that merely takes into account the number of Montessori schools, since Montessori’s influence could appear still limited today if we only consider this aspect. Other references, of a more specifically qualitative kind, could be considered later on by taking into account statistical data and those indicators of criteria for a qualitative selection of schools.

Language: English

ISSN: 2281-8375

Article

Reconciliation in the Land of Warajinda (Woorabinda): Part II–The Prepared Adult!

Available from: AMI Montessori Digital

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 14

Pages: 19–23

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Oceania

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Language: English

Article

The Montessori Method of Education

Publication: Theosophy in New Zealand, vol. 11

Pages: 240-243

Asia, Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, India, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Zealand, Oceania, South Asia, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Language: English

ISSN: 0049-3708

Article

Wanted: Montessori Materials Required in Cape York

Available from: AMI Montessori Digital

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 3

Pages: 7

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Aboriginal Education Trust

Language: English

Article

NAMTA Pays Tribute to Australia

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 37, no. 1

Pages: 1–2

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Preface

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Montessori National Curriculum, November 2011

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 37, no. 1

Pages: 3–307

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: full curriculum from birth through 16 years

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

The Historical Evolution and Contemporary Status of Montessori Schooling in New Zealand as an Example of the Adaptation of an Alternative Educational Ideal to a Particular National Context

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: There have been two distinct phases of the Montessori method of education in New Zealand. The first began in 1912 and continued into the 1950s. The second phase, starting in 1975, has resulted in over one hundred Montessori early childhood centres being established throughout the country. In this thesis I examined the historical evolution and contemporary status of Montessori schooling in New Zealand, as an adaptation of an alternative educational ideal to a particular national context. To situate this study, the history of the Montessori movement was investigated, taking into consideration the particular character and personality of its founder, Dr. Maria Montessori (1870-1952). It is argued that the apparent contradictions of Montessori, who claimed to be both a scientific educator and a missionary, help explain the endurance of her method. The thesis further maintains that Montessori became a global educator whose philosophy and pedagogy transcends national boundaries. The middle section of this thesis examines the Montessori movement in New Zealand during the first phase and the second phase, highlighting the key role that individuals played in spreading Montessori's ideas. The major aim was to examine how Montessori education changes and adapts in different cultures and during different time frames. The thesis concentrates on New Zealand as a culturally specific example of a global phenomenon. The final section of the thesis is a case study of a Montessori early childhood centre examining the influence of Government policy and how the development of the centre supports the ongoing implementation of Montessori's ideas. The perceptions of Montessori teachers, former parents and students regarding the nature and value of Montessori education are also considered. Finally, observations carried out as part of the case study are analysed to further demonstrate the ways in which the original ideas of Montessori have been reworked to suit a different historical and societal context. It is concluded that Montessori is a global educator whose philosophy and pedagogy transcends national boundaries. Nonetheless, the integration of Montessori education within any country, including New Zealand, does result in a culturally specific Montessori education.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2004

Master's Thesis

Breaking the Circle of One: Reflection in Montessori Early Childhood Centres in Aotearoa New Zealand

Available from: Victoria University of Wellington - Research Archive

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Little is currently known about how teachers in New Zealand Montessori early childhood centres reflect on Montessori philosophy and practice individually and collaboratively within teaching teams. The purpose of this research was to discover the current views about reflection on Montessori philosophy, the barriers teachers faced in reflecting and opportunities they identified for reflection. The impact that requirements for self review and teacher reflection have had on the approach taken to reflection, inquiry and professional learning by teachers in Montessori early childhood centres was also investigated. This research study used a mixed method case study and data was collected from teachers working in Montessori early childhood centres through semistructured interviews with three groups and an online survey of individual teachers. Participants placed high importance on reflection. However some participants were reluctant to critique Montessori philosophy; either because they viewed it as ‘valid’ or because they were concerned about being regarded as ‘heretical’ by other teachers. Participants felt safe raising questions within their teaching teams, but were more wary of debating and questioning philosophical issues with teachers in the wider Montessori community. Others regarded reflection as an opportunity to develop a shared understanding of Montessori philosophy and practice in their early childhood centre. Despite the participants’ perception that their team spent time reflecting on Montessori philosophy and relating this to daily teaching practice, it was still a challenge to make these reflective activities a priority in limited centre team meeting times. In addition, it appears that more support is needed to improve skills and knowledge about how the cyclical process of review or inquiry can engage with Montessori philosophy, inform centre philosophy, drive centre practice and improve outcomes for children. This study suggests that teachers would benefit from the creation of ‘safe spaces’ where they can engage with colleagues from their own or other Montessori early childhood centres in debate and discussion so that teaching practice becomes based on critical engagement with the underlying theoretical or philosophical principles of Montessori education.

Language: English

Published: Wellington, New Zealand, 2014

Master's Thesis

Respectful Relationships: How Does the Montessori Environment Foster Relationships with Respect?

Available from: Auckland University of Technology Library

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates the phenomenon of respect through examination of the literature and observation of lived experience in two Montessori environments in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Utilising a case study approach, the thesis seeks to reveal the nature of respectful relationships and how these are fostered in two Montessori early childhood centres. A qualitative approach is used to study the social setting in order to understand the meaning of participants’ lives in their own terms. This design makes explicit the ways people come to understand and manage day-to-day situations. A phenomenological method was employed to look beyond the details of everyday life in order to draw upon the lived experiences of the participants. The technique of bracketing observations required the researcher to suspend assumptions and common-sense explanations concerning the experience. This assisted the researcher to encounter the observations independently and reduced bias. The findings reveal four aspects that work in conjunction with the child’s natural development to foster respect: A prepared environment and the child’s freedom within that environment serve to demonstrate how the respectful relationship can be supported and fostered in individuals. In addition, the development of a mutual relationship based on recognition of the child's capabilities; and freedom of movement within the environment work in conjunction to foster respect for self, others and the environment. Information for the case studies was recorded by video camera. Relationship building prior to data collection alleviated fears associated with the video recording and provided more insight into participants’ lived experiences. In conjunction, video data provided a record of moments in time for review and reflection. Future research may seek to provide comparison of the outcomes of practice in differing situations but a key point in this research was an emphasis on non-judgmental acceptance of each Montessori environment. The research sheds light on situations in which teachers, other adults and children develop respectful practice(s). The study indicates how Montessori philosophy and nature intertwines to achieve reciprocal and respectful relationships between all involved in this approach to education and life.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2013

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