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Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Maria Montessori's Moral-Sense Theory

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: History of Philosophy Quarterly, vol. 32, no. 3

Pages: 271-292

Maria Montessori - Philosophy, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori is not generally known as a philosopher. She is best known for the Montessori schools around the world that bear her name and for her (oft-misunderstood) pedagogical ideas about children's liberty. But after completing her medical degree and spending several years in professional medicine and psychiatry, including working with children, Montessori left most of her professional responsibilities to enroll in a PhD program in philosophy at the University of Rome, in order, as she put it, to "undertake the study of... the principles on which [pedagogy] is based" (MM, 33). There she studied under philosophers such as Giacomo Barzellotti (for history of philosophy), Pietro Ragnisco (moral philosophy), and one of the most important Italian philosophers of the early twentieth century, Antonio Labriola, not to mention philosophically inclined psychologists and anthropologists (Foschi 2012, Trabalzini 2003). At the same time, her personal interest in psychology intersected with Italian interest in American pragmatism (particularly William James), whose philosophical-psychological writings she cites throughout her works. Despite this philosophical background, Montessori's philosophical thought has not been taken seriously. At most, some have focused on her philosophy of education, and there has been some discussion of her feminism (Babini 2000; Babini and Lama 2000) and her place in the history of psychology (Babini 2000; Foschi 2012; Kramer 1976; Trabalzini 2003). Through providing an overview of her moral epistemology, the present essay aims to show that Montessori is a moral philosopher worth taking seriously.

Language: English

ISSN: 0740-0675

Book

Changing the Educational Landscape: Philosophy, Women, and Curriculum

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Educational change

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Abstract/Notes: Changing the Educational Landscape is a collection of the best-known and best-loved essays by the renowned feminist philosopher of education, Jane Roland Martin. Trained as an analytic philosopher at a time before women or feminist ideas were welcome in the field, Martin brought a philosopher's detachment to her earliest efforts at revolutionizing the curriculum. Her later essays on women and gender further showcase the tremendous intellectual energy she brought to the field of feminist educational theory. Martin explores the challenges and contradictions posed by the very concept of women's education, and also recognizes how the presence of women necessitates the rearticulation of not only the curriculum but also the standard ideologies in education.

Language: English

Published: New York: Routledge, 1994

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-315-02155-3

Article

Court Order, Montessori Philosophy May Clash in St. Louis [Missouri]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 16

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Multicultural Dimensions of Montessori: Philosophy and Method

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 50–64

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Music and the Adolescent: Offering an Enticing Music Programme that Supports Montessori Philosophy and Practice

Publication: Montessori Insights

Pages: 25-26

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Language: English

Master's Thesis

Una mirada a la filosofía Montessori en el sistema público de enseñanza de Puerto Rico [A look at the Montessori philosophy in the public education system of Puerto Rico]

Available from: University of Puerto Rico - Theses and Disserations Collection

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Public Montessori, Puerto Rico

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Abstract/Notes: Este trabajo presenta las ideas sobresalientes de Montessori. Examina el vínculo entre el enfoque de dicha filosofía y la enseñanza de inglés en Puerto Rico con énfasis de las posibilidades que ofrece tal metodología para obtener logros em la enseñanza de una segunda lengua. Finalmente, expone los retos que enfrenta el maestro que interesa estudiar y aplicar la filosofía Montessori en las escuelas públicas de Puerto Rico.

Language: Spanish

Published: Río Piedras, Puerto Rico, 2020

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 17, Folder 21 - Notes, ca. 1929-1948 - "Religious - London" [House; Rock; St. Peter-First Pope]

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Conference Paper

Maria Montessori’s Philosophy of Education: An Early Beginning of Embodied Education

Available from: University Colleges Knowledge database (Denmark)

18th International Network of Philosophers of Education Conference: Pedagogical Forms in Times of Pandemic (Copenhagen, Denmark, 17-20 August 2022)

Comparative education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: For a century Montessori’s philosophy of education has been understood in separation from Dewey’s philosophy of education. According to Thayer-Bacon [1], a plausible explanation is that Kilpatrick, Dewey’s influential student, rejected Montessori’s system of education [2]. His main objection was that her educational system was founded on an outdated psychology. In contrast, this paper suggests, Montessori’s educational systems is founded on a psychology which, like Dewey’s, was markedly ahead of her time by putting purely embodied interactions with the environment as the foundation of human understanding. By comparing Montessori’s psychology [3; 4] to Dewey’s [5; 6] this paper shows their compatibility. The developed pragmatism of Sellars [5;6] and the interactivism of Bickhard [7] further enables us to explain how the prelinguistic human-environment interactions (or transactions), central to Dewey and Montessori, are pure processes [8]. The pure process ontology enables us to see how more complex processes emerge from simpler ones and how learning in the mere causal domain of bodily human-environment interactions can grow into the linguistic and conceptual domain of education. The ambition is to show that a flourishing interaction between Montessori and pragmatism is possible and preferable if we are to understand the proper role of the body in education. [1] Thayer-Bacon, Barbara (2012). Maria Montessori, John Dewey, and William H. Kilpatrick. Education and Culture, 28, 1, 3-20. [2] Kilpatrick, W. H. (1914). The Montessori system examined. Cambridge, Mass.; The Riverside Press [3] Montessori, M. (1912). The Montessori method. NY: Frederick A. Stokes Company [4] Montessori. M. (1949). The absorbent mind. Adyar: The Theosophical Publishing House [5] Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and education. NY: The Macmillan Company [6] Dewey, J. (1925) Experience and nature. Chicago: Open Court Publishing Company [7] Sellars, W. (1960). Being and Being Known. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association, 34, 28-49. [8] Sellars, W. (1981). Foundations for a metaphysics of pure process: The Carus lectures of Wilfrid Sellars. The Monist 64 (1):3-90. [9] Bickhard, M. H. (2009). The interactivist model. Synthese, 166, 3, 547-591. [10] Seibt, Johanna (2016). How to Naturalize Intentionality and Sensory Consciousness within a Process Monism with Gradient Normativity—A Reading of Sellars. In James O'Shea (ed.), Sellars and His Legacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 186-222.

Language: English

Published: Copenhagen, Denmark: International Network of Philosophers of Education, 2022

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

Searching for a Philosophy: Growing with Children

Available from: Concordia University - Institutional Repository

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Abstract/Notes: My personal search for principles and practices to guide my role as a teacher of young children took me to Munich, Germany to be trained in the Montessori method; to Tumbaco, Ecuador to be a teacher trainee at the Wild's active school and most recently to Bali, Indonesia to experience Jean Liedloff's notion of a continuum concept. This search has brought me skills to set up an environment for children and to better understand my role in it. My work with children has helped me to integrate the principles and practices of individuals who have inspired my own feelings, thoughts and actions, thereby eliminating conflicts which I have previously experienced.

Language: English

Published: Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1993

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

Some Considerations for an Elementary School Science Curriculum Based on the Cognitive Theories of Jean Piaget and the Philosophy of Maria Montessori

Elementary education, Jean Piaget - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Science - Study and teaching

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Language: English

Published: Rohnert Park, Calif., 1980

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