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1121 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Children's Preference for Real Activities: Even Stronger in the Montessori Children's House

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 1-9

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the United States, children are often given the opportunity to engage in pretend activities; many believe this kind of play benefits children’s development. Recent research has shown, though, that when children ages 4 to 6 are given a choice to do the pretend or the real version of 9 different activities, they would prefer the real one. The reasons children gave for preferring real activities often concerned their appreciation of the functionality; when children did prefer pretend activities, their reasons often cited being afraid of, not allowed to, or unable to do the real activity. Given that children in Montessori classrooms have more experience performing real, functional activities, in this study we asked if this preference for real activities is even stronger among children in Montessori schools. We also asked children to explain their preferences. The data are from 116 3- to 6-year-old children (M = 59.63 months, SD = 12.08 months; 68 female): 62 not in Montessori schools and 54 in Montessori schools. Children explained their preferences for pretendand real versions of 9 different activities. Children in Montessori schools preferred real activities even more than did children in other preschools, but all children explained their choices in similar ways. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to play in preschool classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.7586

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Guiding Children 'Back from the Edge' Preparing an Environment to Support Children at Risk

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 169-190

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: "The children who demand more attention than others, who are disruptive, unmotivated, oppositional, aggressive, or do not give us the positive feedback we get from others…This is where we dig in and find compassion, and understanding, and the knowledge that no child wants to be disruptive, oppositional, or aggressive. They do this because they are hurt, and we are here to help." Sarah Werner Andrews provides an approach to the children who pose a challenge because they themselves are facing challenges. She offers practical tools and approaches that are first based on positive relationships, then on the relationship with the environment, and finally on positive, collaborative interventions. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Children on the Edge: Creating a Path for Happy, Healthy Development," January 12-15, 2017 in New Orleans, LA.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Report

The Evaluation and Implications of Research with Young Handicapped and Low-Income Children at the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children at the University of Illinois

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, North America, Poor children, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study to determine effects of preschool training of mentally retarded children from low-income families asks three major questions: 1. Does preschool training displace the rate of development of such children? 2. Does rate of growth continue at an accelerated rate, or does it return to the original rate of development during primary school years? 3. Are the results similar for children living in different environments? Five intervention programs are outlined: 1. Traditional nursery school; 2. Community Integrated program; 3. The Montessori method; 4. Karnes structured cognitive plan; and 5. The Bereiter-Englemann(B-E). As a result of the program, some children in the demonstration center no longer function in the retarded range. Behavior has improved and several have entered a public school or preschool for normal children. It is suggested that mothers of infants might accomplish more at home with guidance, since professional tutoring is not feasibly practical, and children with higher IQ need special early programming to attain their potential. (RG)

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1973

Book Section

Written Language: The Old Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing; My First Experiments with Defective Children; First Experiments with Normal Children

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 199-216

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Article

What If Our Children Knew of Bali? A Teacher Reflects on a Culture in Which Children Are Respected

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 15–16

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Gardening with Children: Children Helping Nature

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 23

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

What Children Love . . . What Children Hate . . .

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 8, no. 4

Pages: 34–35, 39

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Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Article

Schoolchildren Help Schoolchildren [Gilbachstrasse Montessori School, Cologne, Germany]

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1983, no. 1

Pages: 25–29

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Abstract/Notes: Reprinted from Kolner Presse

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Integrated Edcuaton of Healthy Children and Children with Multiple and Variable Disorders

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1981, no. 1/2

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Special education

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Awareness for Children's Songs of Young Children, Their Teacher's and Parents and Component Analysis of Their Favorite Children's Songs / 유아,교사,학부모의 동요에 대한 인지수준과 구성요소 분석

Available from: RISS

Publication: Montessori교육연구 [Montessori Education Research], vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 79-104

Asia, Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, East Asia, Montessori method of education, South Korea

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Abstract/Notes: In order to know general awareness for children's song among preschoolers, their teachers and parents the questionary paper survey was performed against 212 of kindergarteners, 63 of their teachers and 197 of their parents. At the sametime their favorite children's songs were collected among the prepared lists of children's songs and selected about 10 children's songs for each group, in order. Also, those selected children's songs were analyzed their musical elements, too. The under 4 year old and female children more favorited the singing children's songs everyday than the 5 year old and male. Thachers replied that they selected the proper children's songs in the basic of the topics of usual daily life and children's interests. Also, parents believed that children's songs is very important to develop their children's musicality. Finally, the favorite children's songs were analyzed as followings the major beat was 4/4, the major tonality was C major, the major form and leongth were 8-34 measures, and the major rhythm was the replicated, symcopated and nimbled one. / 본 연구에서는 유아·교사·학부모의 동요에 관한 인지수준과 선호하는 동요의 유형은 어떠한지 또한 유아들이 선호하는 동요의 음악적 구성요소는 어떠한지에 대해 알아보았다. 연구의 대상은 국·공·사립유치원의 유아 212명, 교사 63명 및 학부모 197명이다. 본 연구의 결과는 다음과 같다. 첫째, 유아·교사·학부모의 동요에 관한 인지수준은 유아·교사·학부모 모두가 동요를 좋아하고 동요부르기가 음악성 발달에 매우 중요한 것으로 인식하고 있는 것으로 나타났다. 둘째, 유아·교사·학부모가 선호하는 동요의 유형은 유아는 동물 또는 가족과 관련된 창작동요를 교사는 동물과 식물에 관련된 창작동요제곡과 인터넷동요를 학부모는 식물과 사랑, 기본생활습관에 관련된 창작동요와 인터넷동요를 선호하였다. 결과적으로 유아·교사·학부모의 선호하는 동요는 크게 차이는 없지만 유아들이 선호하는 동요는 학부모의 선호도 보다는 교사가 선호하는 동요와 일치도가 높아 학부모보다는 교사의 영향을 더 받는 것으로 판단되었다. 셋째, 유아들이 선호하는 동요의 악곡의 특징은 노래 마지막 부분에 강세가 있거나 반복적인 리듬과 노랫말에 엄마, 아빠, 아기로 표현된 가족과 연관된 노래와 동물을 의인화한 노래 또는 동물의 의성어를 표현한 노래를 좋아하는 것으로 나타났다.

Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-9417

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