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Book Section

The Importance of Cultural Activities in the House of Children

Book Title: Maria Montessori's Contribution to Educational Thought and Practice: Souvenir in honour of Dr. Maria Monessori's Birth Centenary, 31 August, 1970

Pages: 95-101

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Language: English

Published: New Delhi: Association of Delhi Montessorians, 1971

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation and Some Research Findings

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Book Title: Early Education: Current Theory, Research, and Action

Pages: 105-118

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Chicago: Aldine Pub. Co., 1968

Conference Paper

Culturally Relevant Education and the Montessori Approach: Perspectives from Hawaiian Educators

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006)

Americas, Culturally responsive teaching, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006). The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culture-based (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. The sociocultural perspective on learning provided the theoretical foundations and grounded theory methodology guided the research process. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Report

Report of a Research and Demonstration Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children in the Ancona Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Classroom environments, Early childhood education

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Abstract/Notes: A preschool experience was provided for lower-income negro children, and then their gains or losses in IQ and social integration were evaluated in terms of the type of the teaching method used. Thirty lower-income negro children and 17 middle-income negro and white children were separated into three groups and exposed to three teaching methods. Class one was unintegrated (all lower-income negro children) and non-Montessorial in methodology. It was the most unrestricted in terms of teacher control. Class two as integrated and non-Montessorial, but teacher control and restriction was more evident. Class three was integrated and Montessorial. The pupils here were the most disciplined and controlled. A thorough study was made of these classroom procedures, teaching techniques, and pupil activities. The results of the Stanford Binet intelligence tests showed no significant iq gain among the groups or within a group from test one at the beginning of the eight-week summer session to test two at the end of the session. But individual gains appeared. These were found to be an inverse function of distractibility. A winter pre-school session, with new pupils and using only the Montessori method, resulted in IQ gains. This was attributed to an improved classroom atmosphere. In general, the sessions did increase the children's readiness to begin school work and helped them to gain social confidence. Encouraging parental interest and participation was a collateral aspect of the programs. (WD)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1966

Report

The Effects of Montessori Educational Techniques on Culturally Disadvantaged Head Start Children

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: To determine whether significant differences exist in skill performance as a result of head start experience and to determine whether these differences exist between two ethnic groups, 17 Anglo-American [White] and 62 Mexican American [Latino] culturally disadvantaged children were pre-tested and post-tested during the summer of 1965 in connection with six-week head start programs in Costa Mesa and Fullerton, California. Five teachers using modified Montessori materials stressed three developmental areas, (1) perceptual-motor, (2) social-emotional, and (3) intellectual-academic. Seven instruments were used to test the program's effectiveness--Gesell Maturation Index, Mateer Inversion Test, tests of dominance, teacher rating scale, Goodenough-Harris D-A-P, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and wide range achievement test. Results showed that certain handicaps do exist among culturally disadvantaged children prior to school experience and that positive gains occurred when enrichment experiences were provided. Greatest gains were in the areas of intellectual-academic and social-emotional skills. Ethnic differences appeared in the linguistic skills limitations of the Mexican American children. Need for medical and dental attention was apparent in both groups. Future provision should be made for continued preschool education and wider dissemination of health services. (LG)

Language: English

Published: Fullerton, California, Sep 1965

Presentation

Liberty, Discipline and Pedagogy: Mapping Pathways Towards Social and Cultural Independence Through the Regulation of Activity and Attention in a Montessori Classroom

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Abstract/Notes: The term discipline weaves together, through its etymology and use, both learning and regulation, suggesting that one cannot be achieved without the other. It is in this sense, that Dr Maria Montessori applied the term as she designed her distinctive pedagogy during the first half of the twentieth century. Her aim was for children to regulate their activity and their attention through interaction with meticulously designed objects combined with precise language, including the language of educational disciplines. What distinguishes Montessori pedagogy is that children’s liberty is identified as both the means and the end of this regulation. Liberty and discipline were considered by Dr Montessori (1998 [1939], p. 41) to be ‘two faces of the same coin, two faces of the same action’. Montessori’s emphasis on liberty locates her pedagogy in the Enlightenment tradition, but her simultaneous emphasis on discipline, in both senses, reveals an orientation out of step with the tradition of Rousseau, the tradition which remains in the foreground whenever pedagogy is linked with the legacy of the Enlightenment. This paper presents Montessori’s pedagogy of liberty and discipline as one realisation of another, less visible, Enlightenment tradition. This tradition comes into clearer view when human development is perceived as socially, and therefore, semiotically, mediated (Vygotsky 1986 [1934]) and pedagogy is perceived as discipline knowledge embedded in a regulating social order (Bernstein 2000).

Language: English

Presented: University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia: Disciplinarity, Knowledge and Language (Symposium), Dec 2008

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation and Some Research Findings

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Book Title: Early Formal Education: Current Theory, Research, and Practice

Pages: 105-118

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter describes a small research project evaluating the effects of a Montessori pre-school program upon the cognitive development of a group of Negro children from families in the Aid to Dependent Children category. The program has involved bringing a group of these children into classrooms for middle-class children in a parent-organized Montessori school in Hyde Park. Glen Nimnicht reports that the New Nursery School project at Colorado State College has also found some decreases in IQ in permissive non-integrated classroom programs for culturally disadvantaged children. During the summer, three Head Start classrooms were held in the Ancona Montessori School in the context of a general summer school program. Two of the classrooms were integrated: they were composed of half Head Start children, half middle-class children. The children of average IQ on first testing increased as much as did the children of low IQ on first testing.

Language: English

Published: New York: Routledge, 2017

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-351-31268-4 978-1-138-52252-7

Book

Il volo tra le genti di Maria Montessori: oltre ogni confine geografico, scientifico, culturale, spirituale

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Abstract/Notes: Un libro che descrive come Maria Montessori sia andata oltre ogni confine geografico ma non solo: oltre lo stereotipo femminile del suo tempo, oltre qualsiasi gabbia politica o culturale o spirituale, mescolando tradizioni con innovazioni geniali e rivoluzionarie, lottando tenacemente per farsi accettare e poi imporsi dall’Italia all’Europa, dalla Cina agli Stati Uniti, come donna e come scienziata.

Language: Italian

Published: Roma, Italy: Fefè Editore, 2016

ISBN: 978-88-95988-77-1

Series: Pagine Vere , 29

Article

A Study on the Development and Utilization of Montessori Textbooks for Multicultural Education / 다문화교육을 위한 몬테소리교재 개발 및 활용방안에 관한 연구

Available from: RISS

Publication: Montessori교육연구 [Montessori Education Research], vol. 13

Pages: 1-21

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-9417

Article

Notizie scolastiche e culturali

Available from: Atlante Montessori

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 16, no. 11

Pages: 40

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

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