Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

633 results

Book Section

Montessori Education: Ecoliteracy, Sustainability, and Peace Education

Book Title: The Bloomsbury Handbook of Montessori Education

Pages: 545-552

Ecology, Experiential learning, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Sustainability

See More

Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori’s vision of peace education includes a deep respect for integral human development where a focus on the whole child in the context of the larger community is the norm. Within Montessori education, children learn each part of the universe, living and non-living, play a role in the cosmic order of the world. Long before climate change became a mainstream concern and imminent threat, Montessori understood that ecoliteracy and a deep reverence for understanding how sustainability, sustainable living, respect for the environment, and a deep understanding of the means of production and exchange were essential to the development of a peaceful world. This chapter explores her philosophy of peace education, its relationship to environmental stewardship, and the implementation of these themes within the Montessori context.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2023

ISBN: 978-1-350-27561-4 978-1-350-27560-7 978-1-350-27562-1

Series: Bloomsbury Handbooks

Conference Paper

Research in Progress: Development of Giftedness in the Multi-Age, Multi-Ability Primary School

Available from: ERIC

Esther Katz Rosen Annual Symposium on the Psychological Development of Gifted Children (2nd, Lawrence, Kansas, February 28-29, 1992)

Language acquisition, Language experience approach in education

See More

Abstract/Notes: This research examines how a developmentally appropriate educational program in the early years can affect the development of gifted children. The qualitative research specifically focused on a multi-age, multi-ability setting with partial implementation of a whole language program, a systematic writing process and with some flexibility in grouping of students. Eleven teachers and approximately 260 students in an ungraded primary school were involved, with 3 first year and 30 second year students identified as gifted. The study found that gifted children followed a somewhat accelerated curriculum. Teachers felt that there were definite social benefits to integrating the gifted and nongifted students. The multi-age, multi-ability setting seemed to allow young students not identified as gifted to progress more rapidly than they might have in a traditional graded classroom, as they were exposed to higher level instruction. There was little evidence of the development of creative

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Enacting Accountability in Innovative Schools: The Sensemaking Strategies of Public Montessori Principals

Available from: University of Virginia

See More

Language: English

Published: Charlottesville, Virginia, 2021

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Parent Involvement on Preschool English Language Learners' Ability to Learn the English Language

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: Montessori preschool children who are English Language Learners (ELL) age three to five, consisting of one female and six males. It was conducted in two different preschool classrooms, focusing on literacy skills as well as oral communication skills. The direct aim of the study was to help children successfully learn English as their second language while keeping their native language. Researchers also investigated whether parental involvement increased the ability of ELLs to learn the English language. Data collection procedures utilized were: (1) parent interviews, (2) observation and anecdotal records, (3) pretest, and (4) post-test. A take-home literacy kit was used to measure the effectiveness of parental involvement. Researchers also provided a take-home literacy kit for parents to work on with their child at home. Parents were given a total of four literacy kits, one new kit each week. Result of this research indicated an improvement in parent and child interaction. The take-home literacy kit fostered communication between parent and child because words were translated in their home language. Over the course of four weeks, children showed great interest in literacy and progress in their communication skills.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Article

Sustainability and Montessori

Publication: Montessori Insights

See More

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Multi-Age Classes and High Ability Students

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Review of Educational Research, vol. 69, no. 2

Pages: 187-212

See More

Abstract/Notes: Reviews research on multiage classroom organization as an option for high-ability students. Studies of cognitive and affective factors have consistently shown positive effect sizes. Discusses conditions under which positive effects are most likely and explores multiage classes as an alternative for high-ability children. (Contains 85 references.) (SLD)

Language: English

ISSN: 0034-6543, 1935-1046

Creating a Balanced Literate Environment for the Multi-Age, Multi-Ability, Primary Classroom through Staff Development.

See More

Abstract/Notes: A practicum was designed to increase the expertise of primary teachers in the creation of developmentally appropriate reading/writing curriculum for the multi-age, multi-ability, primary classroom through literacy training staff development sessions. The system of literacy training was constructed over a period of eight months with 34 primary teachers from three elementary schools. Staff development training sessions on early literacy and authentic assessment using the running record were developed. Pre/post questionnaires, change assessment scales for administrators, a literacy plan of action for local schools, running record scripts for assessment training, literacy lessons, and developmentally appropriate curricula were administered or developed. Analysis of the data revealed that after the staff development training on early literacy and authentic assessment, the primary teachers were able to create a developmentally appropriate curriculum for reading and writing in the

Language: English

Published: Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1994

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Multilingualism in a Montessori Preschool: A Study of Language Variability in a Linguistically Diverse Preschool Programme

Available from: IndianJournals

Publication: Journal of Exclusion Studies, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 111-131

Asia, Bilingualism, India, Multilingualism, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: This article is based on a study of an ‘English-medium’ preschool programme for underprivileged children. The diverse linguistic backgrounds of the teachers and students prompted an enquiry into how multiple languages would be negotiated in the setting and how comprehension, learning and communication would occur given that none of the children came from English-speaking homes. The article identifies and interprets key features of verbal language that were observed in the setting and articulates implications for educational practice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5958/2231-4555.2019.00009.3

ISSN: 2231-4547, 2231-4555

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Examining a Public Montessori School's Response to the Pressures of High-Stakes Accountability

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 42-54

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: A public Montessori school is expected to demonstrate high student scores on standardized assessments to succeed in the current school accountability era. A problem for a public Montessori elementary school is how to make sense of the school’s high-stakes assessment scores in terms of Montessori’s unique educational approach. This case study examined the ways one public Montessori elementary school responded to its high-stakes test scores in the areas of curriculum, instruction, and assessment. The research revealed the ways the principal, teachers, and parents on the school council modified Montessori practices, curriculum, and assessment procedures based on test scores. A quality Montessori education is designed to offer children opportunities to develop both cognitive skills and affective behaviors such as student motivation that will serve them beyond their public school experiences. However, fundamental Montessori practices were modified as a result of the pressure to raise test scores. The impact of the highstakes assessment era on alternative types of schools must be considered because it is contradictory to support the availability of educational alternatives while at the same time pressuring these schools to conform to strict and narrow measures of success.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v1i1.4913

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of Montessori Teaching Method on Writing Ability of Iranian Male and Female EFL Learners

Available from: Global Talent Academy

Publication: Journal of Practical Studies in Education, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 8-15

Asia, Efficacy, Iran, Middle East, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study was an attempt to find out the impact of Montessori teaching method on EFL learners’ writing achievement. To fulfill the purpose of the study, out of 150 students, 95 male and female students were selected randomly to participate in this study. All of them were given a pretest to find out their level of proficiency. They had no background knowledge of English and they had not studied English before. They were also divided randomly into two groups namely experimental and control. The experimental group consisted of 23 male and 27 female learners while the control group consisted of 21 male and 24 female learners. Experimental group members were instructed based on Montessori teaching method and their instruction was based on different Montessori materials. The control group members had a routine teaching process. Each group was a mixture of both male and female learners with the age range of 5-6. After 12 sessions, writing posttest was given to both groups to evaluate whether there is any significant difference between these two groups or not. The obtained data were analyzed both descriptively and inferentially. The data were analyzed by statistical tests such as one-way ANCOVA and one-sample t-test. The statistical analyses revealed that there was significant statistical differences between two groups mean scores on the writing posttest. Therefore, it can be argued that Montessori teaching method had significant impact on learners’ writing skill.

Language: English

DOI: 10.46809/jpse.v2i1.17

ISSN: 2634-4629

Advanced Search