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1373 results

Book

Asili nido in Italia: il bambino da 0 a 3 anni [Nursery schools in Italy: the child from 0 to 3 years]

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Language: Italian

Published: Milano, Italy: Marzorati, 1980

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Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Montessori Education on Five Fields of Development and Learning in Preschool and School-Age Children

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 73

Pages: Article 102182

Child development, Children, Elementary school students, Learning, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Preschool children

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Abstract/Notes: This meta-analysis examines the effects of Montessori Education (ME) on five dimensions of development and learning in preschool and school-age children. It includes data from 33 experimental or quasi-experimental studies comparing ME with other pedagogical approaches (268 effect sizes; n = 21,67). These studies were conducted in North-America, Asia and Europe, and published between 1991 and 2021. Effect size estimated using Hedges’ unbiased g, and a 3-level multilevel meta-analytic approach applied due to the dependency among the effect sizes obtained from the same study. Results showed that ME’s effects on development and learning are positive and vary from moderate to high, depending on the dimension considered: cognitive abilities (g = 0.17), social skills (g = 0.22), creativity (g = 0.25), motor skills (g = 0.27), and academic achievement (g = 1.10). Analyses of different moderators did not reveal differences by school level, type of publication and continent.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2023.102182

ISSN: 0361-476X

Article

Be Gentle with Your School's Founding Head

Publication: Montessori Leadership, vol. 1, no. 3

Pages: 4–5

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Language: English

Article

Montessori Methods in Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Education Digest, vol. 56, no. 1

Pages: 63-66

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The article describes Montessori instruction and how this method is being increasingly adopted by public schools. Although private schools remain the primary settings for Montessori instruction in the U.S., the philosophy and methods identified with the movement have spread rapidly in the public system in the 1980s. First embraced by public educators in the mid-1970s as a theme for magnet programs designed to spur desegregation, the approach is now being used in about 110 public schools in 60 districts. Some 14,000 pupils were enrolled as of last 1989. The two major professional groups in the filed differ on the extent to which Montessori methods should be adapted to today's society, and dozens of different associations provide teacher training. Association leaders say they are working separately and together to promote the movement's spread into the public sector. But they concede that their efforts are relatively recent. The secret is based on the work of Maria Montessori, an Italian physician and biologist born in 1870 who first worked with children labeled and retarded and then with the children of poor families in inner-city Rome. Her children learn best in environments that respect and support their individual development. Maintaining that children's first six years are the most critical for learning, Montessori promoted a holistic approach that would begin children's education at an early age. In the eighties, the emphasis on early childhood education and the emergence of the school choice movement have further bolstered the popularity of Montessori ideas among school-savvy parents. The American Montessori Society (AMS) represents more than 700 schools. The U.S. branch of the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) represents 130 schools. While only about two dozen public schools are officially recognized by either the AMS or the AMI, many public school teachers have been trained in programs accredited by those groups.

Language: English

ISSN: 0013-127X

Article

En förmiddag på montessoriförskola i Detroit [A morning at a Montessori preschool in Detroit]

Publication: Montessori-tidningen (Svenska montessoriförbundet), no. 6

Pages: 11-12

Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: Swedish

ISSN: 1103-8101

Article

Building Better Schools through Self Study and Parent-School Partnership

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 26–27

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Uit de School

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, vol. 7, no. 11

Pages: 95

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Language: Dutch

Article

Waarnemingen uit de Montessori-School

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, vol. 11, no. 3

Pages: 18-19

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Language: Dutch

Doctoral Dissertation

Executive Function, Social-Emotional Skills, and Academic Competence in Three Preschool Programmes: Pathways to School Readiness

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Academic achievement, Comparative education, Executive function, Preschool education, Social emotional learning

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Abstract/Notes: Research findings indicate that executive function (EF), social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence significantly promote children's school readiness and later success. School readiness broadly refers to a combination of skills necessary to function successfully in school and lack thereof may increase the risk of children's school problems. Therefore, it is essential for school systems to provide appropriate and timely support to the development of these fundamental skills. The present study focused on three particular preschool programmes: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and the traditional play-based (British Columbia Early Learning Framework: BCEFL) programmes in Western Canada. Although they are popular, there is little empirical research that examines and compares the benefits of these programmes to the development of school readiness skills. As such, the present study aimed to 1) determine the effectiveness of these three preschool programmes in Western Canada on the development of children's school readiness; and 2) examine other sources of influences in the child, family and school in relation to the development of school readiness skills. Overall, 119 preschool children (48 Montessori, 42 Reggio Emilia, 29 BCELF) participated in the study. Observation was conducted once in the autumn of 2015 for each classroom using the CLASS observation tool. Teachers and parents of participating children filled in a series of questionnaires regarding the quality of their relationship with their child and their perceptions of daily EF and social-emotional skills of their child. The researcher also assessed individual children's fluid intelligence, EF, and pre-academic competence. The results showed that 1) although Montessori education appeared to be the most effective in facilitating numeracy skills, no curriculum stood out as notably more effective than any of the others at improving other areas of school readiness skills; 2) well-run classrooms where teachers were effective in time, behavioural, and attention management were most effective in promoting children's numeracy skills; 3) EF, social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence exhibited an overlapping developmental process over time; 4) relational quality in both home and school environments significantly affected the development of school readiness skills, especially social-emotional skills; and 5) adults' perceptions of children's EF and social-emotional skills had a significant consequence for how teachers and parents formed their relationships with their children.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2018

Master's Thesis

The Effects of Nature on Concentration in Preschool: A Montessori Context

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: This study explored the effects of nature’s environment on attention fatigue restoration, and consequently the regulation of attention in preschool students through a Montessori perspective. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate how effective the attention restoration theory (ART) is for preschool students’ attention fatigue and, consequently, concentration. In addition, this study examined the implications ART has on developing independent attention sustainability in the context of the work period practiced in Montessori pedagogy. The retrospective interview of a Montessori teacher who has taught both indoors and outdoors provided content for further discussion about outdoor learning and its effects on concentration. In conclusion, there seems to be a positive influence on preschool students’ ability to concentrate on a task while working outdoors vs. indoors.

Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2022

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