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Book

Il fanciullo montessoriano e l'educazione infantile

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools

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Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Armando, 1975

Edition: 2nd edition expanded

Series: Educazione comparata e pedagogie , 22

Book Section

La pedagogia e la scuola dell'infanzia prima e dopo il contributo e l'apertura montessoriana

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 49-79

Aldo Agazzi - Writings, Conferences, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 26, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Article

История и Развитие Субъектно-Деятельностного Подхода М. Монтессори в Дошкольном Образовании [History and Development of M. Montessori Approach of Subject Activity in Preschool Education]

Available from: MAGTU

Publication: Гуманитарно-Педагогические Исследования [Humanitarian and Pedagogical Research], vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 56-62

Belarus, Eastern Europe, Europe, Russia

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Abstract/Notes: 31 августа 2020 г. исполнится 150 лет со дня рождения Марии Монтессори, известного итальянского педагога, врача, доктора медицинских наук, ученого мирового уровня. Педагогическое новаторство Монтессори имеет свою неоднозначную историю, в значимости и актуальности которого авторы попытаются разобраться в данной статье. Цель педагогики М. Монтессори – воспитание свободного, самостоятельного человека. В основе системы лежат идеи свободного воспитания: недопустимости насилия над личностью ребенка, его индивидуальной свободы, самоценности, уникальности периода детства, отрицания активного педагогического вмешательства в его развитие. Великий педагог отмечала существование особого мира детства, в котором развитие ребенка подчиняется особым законам, а психическое развитие идет успешнее, когда ребенком обретается независимость и внутренняя свобода. Авторы подчеркивают, что Монтессори-материалы позволили не только индивидуализировать процесс обучения, но и способствовали творческому развитию субъектов образования. В своих исследованиях М. Монтессори отводила педагогу роль наблюдателя, экспериментатора, создателя особых условий для естественного пробуждения у детей интереса к предметному окружению, создателя особой материальной среды с комплексом упражнений для саморазвития и самовоспитания ребенка дошкольного и младшего школьного возраста. В современном дошкольном образовании субъектнодеятельностный подход является одним из значимых и перспективных, и поэтому так важно знать его истоки, тесно связанные с именем М. Монтессори, ее методом свободного саморазвития ребенка в условиях специально подготовленной среды. Сегодня Монтессори-педагогика, определив новый способ педагогического мышления в ХХ веке, заняла прочное место в инновационном развитии дошкольного образования во всем мире, в том числе в Республике Беларусь и России ХХI века. [August 31, 2020 will mark the 150th anniversary of the birth of Maria Montessori, a famous Italian teacher, doctor, doctor of medical sciences, world-class scientist. Montessori's pedagogical innovation has its own ambiguous history, the significance and relevance of which the authors will try to understand in this article. The goal of M. Montessori's pedagogy is to educate a free, independent person. The system is based on the ideas of free upbringing: the inadmissibility of violence against the child's personality, his individual freedom, self-worth, the uniqueness of the childhood period, the denial of active pedagogical intervention in his development. The great teacher noted the existence of a special world of childhood, in which the child's development is subject to special laws, and mental development is more successful when the child gains independence and inner freedom. The authors emphasize that Montessori materials made it possible not only to individualize the learning process, but also contributed to the creative development of educational subjects. In her research, M. Montessori assigned the teacher the role of an observer, an experimenter, the creator of special conditions for the natural awakening of children's interest in the objective environment, the creator of a special material environment with a set of exercises for self-development and self-education of a child of preschool and primary school age. In modern preschool education, the subject-activity approach is one of the most significant and promising, and therefore it is so important to know its origins, closely related to the name of M. Montessori, her method of free self-development of a child in a specially prepared environment. Today Montessori pedagogy, having defined a new way of pedagogical thinking in the twentieth century, has taken a firm place in the innovative development of preschool education all over the world, including in the Republic of Belarus and Russia in the twenty-first century.]

Language: Russian

Article

The Effect of Using Montessori Method on Developing Kindergartener's Speaking and Reading skills

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة التربية في القرن 21 للدراسات التربوية والنفسية [Journal of Education in the 21st Century for Educational and Psychological Studies], vol. 1, no. 10

Pages: 1-23 (Article 3)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Egypt, Language development, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North Africa, Reading - Academic achievement

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Abstract/Notes: play and have fun, the learning and teaching processes should be suited totheir nature. There is a number of known interesting learning activitieswhich are based on the arts, games and other oral activities. Thus Englishshould be taught as a means of communication and researchers should dotheir best to help EFL learners to develop their reading and speaking skills.Ur (2000: 12) declared that "out of all the four skills ,listening,speaking, reading and writing, speaking seems the most important, peoplewho speak a language are known as speakers of the language, as if speakingincluded all other kinds of knowing a target language" Today, many secondlanguage learners give the speaking skill priority in their learning because ifthey master this skill then they will be considered as if they have masteredall of the other skills.The importance of speaking is best shown with the integration of theother language skills. For instance, speaking can help students develop theirvocabulary and grammar and improve their writing skill. Ability to read isthe primary fundamental skill required for children to achieve academicsuccess. Currently, the expectation is that all children should begin readingearly and be able to read on grade level by third grade (U.S. Department ofEducation, 2002)Another way that speaking and reading are connected is throughdecoding .decoding is the process of pulling apart the sounds that each(1)letter makes, and then putting them back together to make a word.it is mucheasier for a child to sound out a word on the page that they have alreadyheard in conversation, than a completely new word. There less informationto process since the meaning and the pronunciation of the word are alreadyknown. A child who has heard more words spoken is at an advantage whenlearning to read, the skill of reading is special and often difficult to acquire.the fact that anyone learns how to read is something of a miracle. Learningto read is different from learning to speak; in the development of humanhistory, speaking precedes reading by thousands of yearsItalian educator and physician Maria Montessori developed aninnovative teaching methodology for children that left an indelible mark oneducation curricula throughout the world. Montessori education is a sensorybasedpedagogy that is based on the belief that children learn at their ownpace through manipulation of objects (Lopata, Wallace, & Finn,2005).According to Montessori, (Montessori, 1967, p.14). the goal ofeducation is “to be able to find activities that are so intrinsically meaningfulthat we want to throw ourselves into them” (Crain : 2004) confirmed thisassertion by noting that “when children find tasks that enable them todevelop their naturally emerging capacities, they become interested in themand concentrate deeply on them.In general, there is a need for more research regarding successfuleducational methods and pedagogy for this disenfranchised populationbecause the existing research does not adequately provide educationalplanners with the resources or information to develop effective programs(Williams:2001) examined the impact of the Montessori Method on(2)refugee children‟s social, cognitive and motor development using adifference-in-difference approach .The Montessori method of teachingaimed the fullest possible development of the whole child, ultimatelypreparing him for life‘s many rich experiences. Complemented by hertraining in medicine, psychology and anthropology, Dr .Maria Montessori(1870-1952) developed her philosophy of education based upon actualobservation of children.Students are assigned their own personal workstations designed witheducational items that correspond to the daily lesson plans and activities.Students are responsible for setting up the work area, choosing the learningactivity, applying the physical materials, and returning the materials back tothe shelves (Pickering: 2004).Children are always free to move around theroom and are not given deadlines for the various learning tasks. Desks arearranged into open networks that encourage meaningful group discourse, aswell as independent learning.Students work together with the teachers to organize time strategicallyin order to complete the necessary learning tasks of the day. The amount ofteachers in the classroom varies based on class size, but usually two teachersare used for sections with thirty or more students, In most settings, childrenare grouped in mixed ages and abilities based on three to six-year incrementssuch as 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-15 and 15-18 (other Montessori schools use onlythree year increment settings). Ages are mixed so that older students canassist and mentor the younger children in the group. Students are groupedaccording to common interests and experiences rather than the ability andskill level (Pickering: 2004).According to Montessori, from birth to age three the child learnsprimarily through the “unconscious absorbent mind.” During education in(3)the first three years, Montessori believed that it was necessary for theparents to develop in the role of unobtrusive educator; there to protect andguide without infringing on the child‟s right to self-discovery (Crain: 2004).This early developmental model enabled children to learn their own skillsat their own place. During the ages of three to six the child begins to utilizethe “conscious absorbent mind” which prompts students to participate increative problem-solving consisting of wooden and metal objects of varioussizes and shapes, personally designed by Montessori. If a problem becomestoo difficult or overwhelming for the student, the teacher delays the projectfor a future day. Children also engage in practical work consisting ofhousehold tasks and personal maintenance.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jsep.2020.84322

ISSN: 2682-1931

Article

Pedagogia nuova e scuola attiva in Italia

Publication: La Civiltà Cattolica, vol. 82

Pages: 403-414

Active learning, Activity programs in education, Agazzi method of teaching, Aldo Agazzi - Philosophy, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Europe, Italy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Rosa Agazzi - Philosophy, Southern Europe

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0009-8167

Book

The Normalized Child

Americas, Aquinas Montessori School (Alexandria, Virginia), Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Motivation (Psychology), Normalization, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: A version of this publication was published in NAMTA Journal (vol. 22, no. 2, Spring 1997, p. 138-156).

Language: English

Published: Alexandria, Virginia: Aquinas Montessori School, 1971

Article

La conquista del linguaggio

Available from: Il Quaderno Montessori - Grazia Honegger Fresco

Publication: Il Quaderno Montessori, vol. 4, no. 16

Pages: 8-24

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Language acquisition, lettura, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Extract from the lessons held at the Montessori National Course, Castellanza, 1986.

Language: Italian

ISSN: 2239-5326

Book

The Normalized Child

Americas, Aquinas Montessori School (Alexandria, Virginia), Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Motivation (Psychology), Normalization, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This booklet is a printed edition of a talk given to parents of children at The Aquinas Montessori School (Alexandria, Virginia) in 1966, when the school was newly opened. Later, at the request of parents, the booklet was prepared and used for parent education and information by many other Montessori schools and organizations. The booklet describes Maria Montessori's view of the characteristics of the "normalized" child, an ideal of child development espoused by Montessori and striven for in Montessori education by providing environments that meet all of a child's developmental needs. The booklet discusses the needs of children in achieving normalization: (1) the need for movement; (2) the need for language development; (3) the need for independence; (4) the need for love and security; (5) the need for discipline; and (6) the need for order. Assuming these needs are met, the normalized child will appear. The booklet goes on to discuss the normalized child's characteristics, including: (1) a love of order; (2) a love of work; (3) love of silence and working alone; (4) mutual aid and cooperation; (5) profound spontaneous concentration; (6) obedience; (7) independence and initiative; (8) spontaneous self-discipline; (9) attachment to reality; (10) sublimation of the possessive instinct; and (11) joy. A version of this publication was published in NAMTA Journal (vol. 22, no. 2, Spring 1997, p. 138-156).

Language: English

Published: Burton, Ohio: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1988

Edition: Revised ed.

Article

The Normalized Child

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 138-156

Americas, Aquinas Montessori School (Alexandria, Virginia), Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Motivation (Psychology), Normalization, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Describes characteristics of the normalized child, the ultimate goal of Montessori education. First outlines children's basic needs, then describes traits of the normalized child, including love of order, work, silence and working alone; mutual aid and cooperation; profound spontaneous concentration; obedience; independence and initiative; spontaneous self-discipline; attachment to reality; sublimation of the possessive instinct; and joy. This was originally published as a booklet in 1971 (with other editions published in 1988 and 1998).

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

The Normalized Child

Americas, Aquinas Montessori School (Alexandria, Virginia), Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Motivation (Psychology), Normalization, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This booklet is a printed edition of a talk given to parents of children at The Aquinas Montessori School (Alexandria, Virginia) in 1966, when the school was newly opened. Later, at the request of parents, the booklet was prepared and used for parent education and information by many other Montessori schools and organizations. The booklet describes Maria Montessori's view of the characteristics of the "normalized" child, an ideal of child development espoused by Montessori and striven for in Montessori education by providing environments that meet all of a child's developmental needs. The booklet discusses the needs of children in achieving normalization: (1) the need for movement; (2) the need for language development; (3) the need for independence; (4) the need for love and security; (5) the need for discipline; and (6) the need for order. Assuming these needs are met, the normalized child will appear. The booklet goes on to discuss the normalized child's characteristics, including: (1) a love of order; (2) a love of work; (3) love of silence and working alone; (4) mutual aid and cooperation; (5) profound spontaneous concentration; (6) obedience; (7) independence and initiative; (8) spontaneous self-discipline; (9) attachment to reality; (10) sublimation of the possessive instinct; and (11) joy. A version of this publication was published in NAMTA Journal (vol. 22, no. 2, Spring 1997, p. 138-156).

Language: English

Published: Cleveland, Ohio: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1998

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