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1107 results

Article

An Expansion of Practice: Special Education and Montessori Public School

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Inclusive Education

Pages: 1-20

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities, Public Montessori, Special education

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Abstract/Notes: The choices for public school education in the United States have evolved to include Montessori programmes. As a result, special education practices have become visible in Montessori, making collaboration essential. The exploration of how Montessori and special education teachers collaborate through the identified constructs of (a) shared planning, (b) frequent communication, (c) shared vision, (d) mutual respect, and (e) joint trust despite the evident philosophical differences is important for students in inclusion. Data sources included in-depth interviews with teachers to identify patterns related to collaboration in Montessori public schools. Findings indicated that there is a need to establish a clear plan for connecting philosophies and for collaboration for students in inclusion, not only in the context of United States public Montessori programmes, but for Montessori practitioners in other regions and school settings. Recommendations include using a terminology comparison activity in teacher professional development and implementing an Inclusion Professional Learning Community to address the barrier of time to proactively create deep collaborative relationships built upon the established collaborative constructs.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/13603116.2021.1931717

ISSN: 1360-3116

Article

Da Ellen Key a Maria Montessori: La Progettazione di Nuovi Spazi Educativi per l’Infanzia [From Ellen Key to Maria Montessori: Planning New Educational Spaces for Childhood]

Available from: Università di Bologna

Publication: Ricerche di Pedagogia e Didattica / Journal of Theories and Research in Education, vol. 5, no. 1

Ellen Key - Biographic sources, Ellen Key - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: In questa prima fase della ricerca - ancora in itinere - si compie un’analisi storico-pedagogica del rapporto infanzia/famiglie/istituzioni. L’indagine si focalizza sulle trasformazioni dei modelli familiari, visti nella loro interdipendenza con l’elaborazione di nuove pratiche educative. Al riguardo, l’avvento del’900 si profila come un passaggio importante, che trova un suo esito nel volume di Ellen Key, Il secolo dei fanciulli. Proprio in quest’opera, la scrittrice svedese elabora una nuova idea di “maternità” e di “paternità” che pone al centro i bisogni e le esigenze infantili. La sua prospettiva diventa oggetto di dibattito, agli inizi del secolo scorso, sia in campo pedagogico, sia in campo femminista, soprattutto in merito al dilemma per la donna di coniugare insieme sfera pubblica e sfera privata, maternità e autonomia individuale. Secondo l’ipotesi qui evidenziata è in particolare Maria Montessori a raccogliere la sfida di Ellen Key, con il suo esperimento pedagogico della “Casa dei bambini”, in cui lo spazio domestico, “privato” si trasforma in uno spazio scolastico, “pubblico”, a misura di “bambino” (valenza estetica degli ambienti, cura delle relazioni umane, ecc.). [In the first phase of research it conducts an historical and pedagogical analysis on the relationship between childhoods, families and institutions, identifying family-models changes and their interdependence with the elaboration of new educative practices. At the beginning of twentieth century, Ellen Key wrote the famous book The century of children. Following the introduction of Modernity age, the author defined a new idea of “motherhood” and “fatherhood” which focused on childish subjects’ needs and requirements. Her prospective became item of debate both in pedagogic and in feminist fields, especially in regard to women’s dilemma on how to combine public and private life, motherhood and individual autonomy. In particular, Maria Montessori took up the Ellen Key challenge, in fact she made the pedagogical experiment of Children’s House, where domestic space became institutional space (settings’ aesthetic quality, human relationships’ care).]

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.6092/issn.1970-2221/1767

ISSN: 1970-2221

Article

Practical Life from the Second Plane to Third Plane: Orientation to History and Social Organization

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 3

Pages: 77-91

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Abstract/Notes: In lyrical prose, Jim Webster lays out his view on the universal human use of tools and how "humans meet the practical demands of life." Webster lauds physical work and the work of the hand as they both support engagement, social cooperation, a deepening of relationships, and sustainability. Practical work is valuable and is plentiful as it generates reciprocal community, dignity, self-awareness, and provides opportunity by giving comfort, refining skills, expressing creative insight, and imparting a sense of gratitude. [This article is based on the talk presented at the NAMTA adolescent workshop titled "From Childhood to Adolescence: Keys, Disciplines, Social Organization, and Life-Long Impact," at the AMI/USA Refresher Course, Houston, TX, Feb 14-17, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Observations on Sara's First Eight Months by Her Mother

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 337-347

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Grazia Honegger Fresco gives us direct observations of her daughter from birth to eight months, grouping her observations by age even further into birth to fourth month, fifth and sixth months, and seventh and eighth months. Within each age range, she focuses on Sara's sensory life and her relationships. Her observations are detailed and gentle as she strives to be free of preconceived judgements. She offers a lovely example of what it means to use observation as a tool to learn the inner life of the child. [Reprinted from "The NAMTA Journal" 15.3 (1990): 50-57.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Errors and Their Corrections

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 215-227

Albert Max Joosten - Writings, Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Observation (Educational method), Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: "Our primary concern is not that the child learns to do something without mistakes. Our real concern is that the child does what he needs, with interest." The reaction of so many adults to the mistakes of children is to correct, immediately and directly, says Joosten. To truly aid the child in development, we must learn to control our response to the child's mistakes and recognize that it is through these mistakes that the child's difficulties are revealed. We always have the choice whether or not to correct a child in the moment of error. If we pay attention and observe the mistakes of children in order to discover the source of those mistakes, we can be guided in how best to remove those difficulties that impede the child's development. [Reprinted from "Around the Child 1" (1956): 32-39.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Lecture 4: April 11, 1927

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 3

Pages: 381-389

Child development, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education, Observation (Educational method), Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: Using examples from the animal world, Montessori speaks of the natural laws of life and the phases of childhood that are different than that of the adult. The child develops independently of the adult. Montessori says, "The child is the period when man is created," and "The child is a worker." Through work, the child can arrive at his own formation (finality). In addition to preparing the environment, the adult must understand that the child must be active beyond what the adult perceives as maximum effort. Growing beyond the expected only happens when the teacher respects the child's independent activity and allows the child to discover his own "mission." This lecture was delivered at the 13th International Training Course, London. The same lecture was given by Maria Montessori earlier that same year at a national Montessori teacher training course in Milan. [Copyright Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company (1927). The Maria Montessori Archives made this article available.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

Multifaceted Strategies for Social-Emotional Learning and Whole Learner Education

Available from: IGI Global

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Abstract/Notes: With the turmoil and conflict that has been present in recent times, it is imperative that new methods of teaching are explored in order to produce emotionally secure and connected individuals. Social-emotional learning and whole learner education has emerged as a strategy to ensure that students are actively engaged in learning, the school, and their community. It teaches them tactics that allow them to better manage their emotions, maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions. It is imperative that the whole learner is supported and encouraged to ensure proper mental health, academic achievement, and social responsibility of current and future generations. 'Multifaceted Strategies for Social-Emotional Learning and Whole Learner Education' is a critical research publication that supports teachers who wish to utilize these teaching theories to meet their students’ needs academically, socially, and emotionally and to ensure that they become lifelong learners. Highlighting topics such as adult learners, professional development, and culturally responsive education, this book is ideal for teachers, guidance counselors, researchers, academicians, and students who want to improve their understanding of learners and their social-emotional growth at various stages of learning, to find strategies that will assist in the development of any learner, and to find strategic models that promote lifelong learning.

Language: English

Published: Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-79984-906-3

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