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1373 results

Article

Art in Montessori Schools

Publication: The Bulletin (English Montessori Society), vol. 3

Art, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Reprinted in AMI Communications 2/3 (1969).

Language: English

Article

La première école Montessori est née il y a cent dix ans [The first Montessori school was born one hundred and ten years ago]

Available from: Le Figaro

Publication: Le Figaro (Paris, France)

Europe, France, Italy, Montessori method of education - History, Southern Europe, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Le succès de cette pédagogie basée sur la liberté et l'éducation sensorielle ne s'est pas démenti depuis le 6 janvier 1907, jour où le docteur Maria Montessori inaugurait, à Rome, sa première école. [The success of this pedagogy based on freedom and sensory education has not been denied since January 6, 1907, the day when Doctor Maria Montessori inaugurated his first school in Rome.]

Language: French

Article

Upcoming Requirements for AMS Secondary Teachers and Heads of Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 4

Pages: 20

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Abstract/Notes: Lead teachers in Secondary-level classes in AMS-accredited and full-member schools who are teaching math, English, history, humanities, or sciences will be required to have the appropriate Montessori credential (i.e., Secondary I or I-II).[...]the head of school must either: * Hold a Montessori credential and score a requisite number of points for professional development and related work experience, as detailed on the Head of School Requirements Verification Form.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

"My Children Taught Me How to Teach Them": Montessori Schools: The Prepared Environment

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 2, no. 4

Pages: 3–6

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Mrs. Ernest Thomson-Seton at Opening of Montessori School for New York Tenement Children

Available from: ProQuest - Historical Newspapers

Publication: The Evening Record (Windsor, Ontario, Canada)

Pages: 8

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Abstract/Notes: "To prove that the Montessori system of education is both practical and available for the poor children of the tenements as well as for those who have every advantage that can be had for money, is the purpose of the Montessori Educational Association, which has just established a school for poor children in the upper East Side in one of the most thronged of the tenement sections of New York. The Montessori idea of education is diametrically opposed to the system in vogue. All the time commonly spent in training children to be passive is in the Montessori schools spent in awakening activity and encouraging initiative. Dr. Montessori, the founder of the new system of education, says that one of the most important tasks of the teacher lies in 'seeing that the child does not confound the idea of good with immobility, and evil with activity.' Instead of devoting months of arduous labor drilling the alphabet and elements of reading and writing into the heads of the little children, Montessori methods develop the various senses which give them control of the apparatur through which they must get all their knowledge of the world. One of the most remarkable things notied by the observers of the new school was the spontaneity with which the children learned to write. From tracing sand-paper letters and building of words by the aid of blocks, many of the children took up bits of chalk and began to write, not a few, but many words. The children learn to observe, to reason and to use their senses rather than clog their memoriy with useless rules. The school furnishes the little tots with luncheon, but even in this they are stimulated to activity. They have little waitresses who learn to move about freely and gracefully, to carry things without breaking them, and to avoid clumsiness and awkwardness. When the meal is over the children will all go into their small kitchen, roll up their sleeves and wash the dishes from which they had been eating. The picture shows Mrs. Ernest Thompson-Seton, the wife of Ernest Thompson-Seton, the Canadian author and naturalist, who is one of the trustees of the Montessori Educational Association, telling a little waitress to pose for the picture."

Language: English

Article

The Year of the Phoenix: The Story of the Fire at Raintree Montessori School [location not noted] and the Miracles That Followed

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 10

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Language: English

Article

The Owner-Executive Running the Montessori School

Publication: The Braille Monitor

Pages: 794-

Blind

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Language: English

ISSN: 0006-8829

Article

Montessori Education and Children Placed at Risk of School Failure

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 70–75

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori nella scuola primaria italiana oggi: Alcune questioni sollevate da un’indagine empirica / Montessori in Italian primary schools today: Some issues raised by an empirical study

Available from: Università di Bologna

Publication: Ricerche di Pedagogia e Didattica / Journal of Theories and Research in Education, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 43-57

Europe, Italy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori schools, Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: This study aims to contribute to the evaluation of Montessori education in Italian primary schools, examining a) its impact on academic and socio-affective outcomes; b) teacher profiles and the fidelity of their implementation. The results show that Montessori students, depending on grade and cohort, achieve similar or significantly higher scores than other students. Additionally, in some cases the distributions of math scores have a significantly higher standard deviation. Regarding socio-affective characteristics, Montessori students score significantly higher on the empathy scale. These results, combined with the fact that only half of Montessori teachers have a more orthodox profile, highlight how the Montessori model conflicts with some features of the Italian primary school system. This raises some questions concerning evaluation, limits to children’s freedom of choice and movement, individualization, organization of work time, and multi-age classrooms.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.6092/issn.1970-2221/16663

ISSN: 1970-2221

Article

Montessori in Public School: A Comparison

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 1-12

Americas, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

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