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120 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Achievement Effects of the Nongraded Elementary School: A Best Evidence Synthesis

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Review of Educational Research, vol. 62, no. 4

Pages: 333

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Language: English

DOI: 10.2307/1170484

ISSN: 0034-6543, 1935-1046

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Exploring Public Montessori Education: Equity and Achievement in South Carolina

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Research in Childhood Education

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article examines the expansion of public Montessori education and its implications for student participation and outcomes. The study focuses on the state of South Carolina, which has the largest number of public Montessori programs in the United States. Through a comprehensive analysis of demographic characteristics and standardized test scores, we investigate the participation of different student groups in public Montessori programs and compare the academic achievement of public Montessori students to their peers in traditional public schools. The findings indicate that public Montessori attracts a diverse range of students, but there is an underrepresentation of less-resourced students and students of color in public Montessori programs. Using matching procedures, we find that Montessori students demonstrated higher achievement growth in ELA and math compared to similar traditional public school students. Subgroup analyses find that higher achievement growth for Montessori students is consistent across many student groups. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of public Montessori and highlights the importance of considering curriculum and educational philosophy when evaluating the impact of education policies and programs.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/02568543.2023.2283202

ISSN: 0256-8543

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effect of Using Montessori Method and Demonstration Method on Students’ Achievement in Pronunciation at Primary 1 Students of Nakamura School Medan

Available from: Universitas Pahlawan Tuanku Tambusai

Publication: Jurnal Review Pendidikan dan Pengajaran (JRPP), vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 407-412

Academic achievement, Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Pronunciation is one of important aspects in English and one of the necessary components of oral communication. The purpose of this research is to find out Montessori Method and Demonstration Method effect on students’ Achievement in Pronunciation at Nakamura School. The method of this research based on experimental quantitative research doing with using a number, statistics process and structure. The population of this research will use to the primary 1 students of Nakamura School Medan. The writer used simple Random Sampling that is subset of individuals 9 a sample (chosen from a larger set 9 a population), each individual is chosen randomly and entirely. After collecting and analyzing the data, it was found that the lowest score of pre-test in experimental group was 20 and the highest score was 40 and the mean of pre-test was 30.00 and  after administrated the method of Montessori method, the researcher found the lowest  score of students’ pronunciation was 40 and the highest score was 80 and the mean of post-test was 61.43. It means that there was 20 (40-20) difference of the lowest score in pre-test and post-test. The mean score of the pre-test was 30.00, and the post-test is 61.43 (61.43 – 30.00 = 31.43). It can be concluded that the students’ scores in pre-test of experimental group was smaller than post-test, which was using Montessori method. The lowest score of pre-test in experimental group by Demonstration method was 10 and the highest score was 30, and the mean of pre-test was 22.86. After post-test was administered, the lowest score in experimental group was 50 and the  and the highest was 80 and the mean of post-test was 61.43. The lowest score significantly improved. It means that the difference of the score was 50 (100-50). It also happened to the highest score, 80 improved to 100 (100-80 = 20). It means that the difference of the score was 30. The mean of pre-test was 22.86 and post-test was 61.43 (61.43- 22.86= 38.27). It can be concluded that the students’ score in the experimental group which was taught by applying Montessori method was significantly different and the students’ score in pre-test of experimental group was smaller than post-test , which was Demonstration method.

Language: English

DOI: 10.31004/jrpp.v6i3.18591

ISSN: 2655-6022, 2655-710X

Article

Montessōri no gyōseki ni tsuite / モンテッソーリの業績について [Montessori Achievements]

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 1

Pages: 9-14

Asia, East Asia, Japan

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Abstract/Notes: This is an article from Montessori Education, a Japanese language periodical published by the Japan Association Montessori.

Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

An Investigation of Montessori Education Efficacy versus the Traditional General Education Classrooms for Improved Achievement

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Students who have attended Montessori pre-kindergarten and kindergarten appear to experience greater academic success than those who attend the general classroom. The purpose of this research was to examine what Montessori classrooms did differently than the general education classrooms and whether Montessori prepares students for greater academic success in elementary school. There is a vast amount of literature available on the impact of Montessori education on student achievement, but few comparison studies. The methodology for this research was causal comparative. Quantitative data was collected to ascertain the practices of Montessori classrooms to produce more academic success than that of the general education classroom. The purpose was to determine if students in a Montessori classroom will have higher academic success or if those in a traditional general education classroom setting will have higher achievement on the MAP reading and math assessment.

Language: English

Published: Central, South Carolina, 2023

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Do Children in Montessori Schools Perform Better in the Achievement Test? A Taiwanese Perspective

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 46, no. 2

Pages: 299-311

Asia, China, Comparative education, East Asia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: The study examines whether elementary school students in Taiwan who had received Montessori education achieved significantly higher scores on tests of language arts, math, and social studies than students who attended non-Montessori elementary programs. One hundred ninety six children in first, second, and third grade participated in the study. Children’s scores were measured by Elementary School Language Ability Achievement Test (ESLAAT), Elementary School Math Ability Achievement Test (ESMAAT), and Social Studies Ability Achievement Test (SSAAT). One-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that students who had Montessori experience had a significantly higher score in language arts in all three grade levels. In math, first grade students scored higher but not second and third grade students. However, in social studies, students who had received Montessori education did not score significantly higher than the non-Montessori students. There was also no significant difference between the number of years spent in Montessori programs and students’ language arts, math, and social studies test scores in first, second, and third grade.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s13158-014-0108-7

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Comprehensive School Reform and Achievement: A Meta-Analysis

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Review of Educational Research, vol. 73, no. 2

Pages: 125-230

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Abstract/Notes: Using 232 studies, this meta analysis reviewed the research on the achievement effects of the nationally disseminated and externally developed school improvement programs known as "whole-school" or "comprehensive" reforms. In addition to reviewing the overall achievement effects of comprehensive school reform (CSR), the meta analysis considered the specific effects of 29 of the most widely implemented models. It also assessed how various CSR components, contextual factors, and methodological factors associated with the studies mediate the effects of CSR. The analysis concludes that CSR is still an evolving field and that there are limitations on the overall quantity and quality of the research base. The overall effects of CSR, though, appear promising and the combined quantity, quality, and statistical significance of evidence from three of the models in particular set them apart from the rest. Whether evaluations are carried out by the developer or by third-party evaluators and whether these evaluators use one-group pre-post designs or control groups are especially important factors for understanding differences in CSR effects. Schools implementing CSR models for five years or more showed particularly strong effects, but the models benefited equally schools of higher and lower poverty levels. A long-term commitment to research-proven educational reform is needed to establish a strong marketplace of scientifically based models capable of bringing comprehensive reform to the nations schools. One appendix lists studies included in the meta analysis, and the other discusses CSR design characteristics. (Contains 1 figure, 5 tables, and 74 references.) (SLD) Also included in JSTOR: https://www.jstor.org/stable/3516091

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/00346543073002125

ISSN: 0034-6543, 1935-1046

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Multiage Programming Effects on Cognitive Developmental Level and Reading Achievement in Early Elementary School Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Reading Psychology, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 1-17

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Abstract/Notes: Differences in cognitive developmental level and reading achievement of elementary school children in multiage programming and traditional classrooms were explored. There is controversy regarding the benefit of multiage classrooms for learning academic subjects. According to previous research (e.g., Almy, Chittenden, & Miller, 1967; Brekke, Williams, & Harlow, 1973; Cromey, 1999), cognitive developmental level, reading achievement, and classroom type all seem to be related entities. This study assesses the effects of multiage classrooms compared to traditional classrooms on cognitive developmental level and reading ability of kindergartners, first graders, and second graders. The effects of cognitive developmental level on reading ability were also explored. The results support the connections among cognitive developmental level, reading ability, and classroom type.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/02702710490271800

ISSN: 0270-2711

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Measurement of Achievement in a Montessori School and the Intelligence Quotient

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Pedagogical Seminary and Journal of Genetic Psychology, vol. 34, no. 1

Pages: 77-89

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/08856559.1927.10533063

ISSN: 0891-9402

Article

Cover Honors Achievements of Dr. Maria Montessori

Publication: Stamps, vol. 251, no. 13

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Language: English

ISSN: 0038-9358

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