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1646 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Mindfulness Intervention: Usefulness In Elementary Classrooms In Regards To Transitions And Collaboration

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this investigation was to see if mindfulness lessons based on breathing and meditation techniques would be effective with elementary age students in building community and collaborative work skills. This was done in a classroom of 25 students ranging from nine to twelve years old. I used a pre and post survey as well as observational data to determine the relevance of the meditations on community clean up time. The results showed that there was an increase in participation as well as a decrease in the time it took for the children to clean up. There was also a heightened awareness of community responsibility based on the post survey results. The observational data also showed that the children were communicating more effectively and even leading discussions on how to problem solve. Other interesting reflections came to light such as the teacher’s assumptions on what the students believed about the importance of their work in the community and their ideas about self. The action plan shows the importance of continued work in mindfulness meditation in the classroom to help support the children to focus, be aware of their environment, communicate more effectively and have a greater appreciation of themselves.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Roleplaying to Develop Self Regulation

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research study investigated the use of child-led play in an after school club as a means to reduce peer conflict and increase cooperation. Prior literature suggests that children behave differently during imaginative play and exhibit greater natural behavior regulation when adult involvement is limited or removed. A small group of child participants, aged 9-14 years, were given materials necessary for a roleplaying game where players take on imaginary characters and cooperatively complete dangerous quests. One child acted as game leader, designing the adventure’s challenges and providing rules adjudication. The children attended six game sessions and completed questionnaires after each meeting. I recorded incidents of conflict between children and rated each game tables' self-management of disagreement. The children also provided verbal feedback in large group discussions. This study indicated that child conflict decreased over time while child awareness increased. Additionally, the children enjoyed their participation. The children who acted as game leaders experienced the greatest change in awareness, resulting in higher expectations of their fellow students. This study has convinced me to incorporate more child-led activity in curricular and extracurricular scenarios. The empathy and self-awareness that grew from leadership during free-play proved the children's good use of independence.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

Montessori Head Start Implementation Brief

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 2

Pages: 105-114

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Head Start programs, Montessori method of education, Parent participation, School administrators, Teacher education, School administrators, Teacher education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the use of the Montessori method in Head Start programs, focusing on educational environment, teacher training, parent involvement, and funding. Outlines the phased implementation of a Montessori program and provides a list of Montessori publications and organizations. (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Group Flow and Group Genius

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 3

Pages: 29-52

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Abstract/Notes: Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing team mates, good communication, and being progress-oriented. Collaboration is an essential ingredient of group flow and is vital to the Montessori classroom. The author has included a notes section with bibliographic information. [Reprinted with permission from chapter 3 of "Group Genius: The Creative Power of Collaboration." New York: Basic Books. Copyright 2007 by Keith Sawyer.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Communicating with the Family for the Child's Best Chance for Success

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 3

Pages: 121-129

Academic achievement, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, Teacher-student relationships, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Joachim Dattke describes a holistic approach to supporting the needs of the family when a child has a disability. The parent and child benefit from a two-pronged approach: working with doctors, psychologists, and therapists in clinic-based settings, and working with educators in schools and parent-child groups. He defines the importance of developing a personalized learning environment that implements specific aids and attainable objectives for each child. Approaching parents with empathy elicits the change of perspective that is needed for the family to understand how the child sees the world. Professor Dattke gives special appreciation to the Montessori educator who can "identify critical development periods in the child and look for objects and action sequences that the child may be interested in" and who prevent social exclusion by actively involving children in their social environment. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Building the Inclusive Montessori Community," Phoenix, AZ, January 16-19, 2014. Translation and editing assistance provided by Barbara Luborsky and Catherine Nehring.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Elementary Physical Education

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 28, no. 1

Pages: 85-104

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Abstract/Notes: Suggests a Montessori elementary level physical education program that provides outlets combining physical and mental energies as well as moral and social awareness. Includes daily scheduling that avoids disruption of work cycle with different daily activities. Suggests the arrangement of key lessons, a healthy attitude toward competition, practical hints for implementing the program within a prepared environment, and ways to modify games for participation within a multi-age group. (Author/KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Samoaktualizacija, optimalna iskustva i reformske pedagogije [Self-actualization, Optimal Experience and Reform Pedagogy]

Available from: Hrčak - Portal of Croatian scientific and professional journals

Publication: Napredak: Časopis za interdisciplinarna istraživanja u odgoju i obrazovanju, vol. 153, no. 2

Pages: 235-247

Educational change, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Rad dovodi u relaciju teoriju samoaktualizacije (Abrahama Maslowa), teoriju optimalnih iskustava (Michaela Csikszentmihalyi-a) i mogućnosti za njihovo ostvarenje u školi. Maslow (1963.) prepoznaje vrhunska iskustva, a Csikszentmihalyi (2006.) trenutke zanesenosti kao istinske trenutke sreće i samoostvarenja/samoaktualizacije. Maslow kao i Lev Vygotsky (1978.) prepoznaje ključan utjecaj socio-kulturalnog okruženja na razvoj djeteta kao preduvjet za razvoj i samoaktualizaciju pojedinca. Imajući u vidu proksimalan razvoj djeteta i njegovu težnju za aktualizacijom potrebno je školsko iskustvo što više približiti vrhunskim iskustvima ili zanesenosti kako bi se omogućilo što uspješnije sudjelovanje učenika u školi. Reformski pedagozi poput Johanna Heinricha Pestalozzija, Johna Deweya i Marije Montessori još prije više od stotinjak godina prepoznaju situacije u školi kada djeca doživljavaju optimalna iskustva i svojim djelovanjem pokušavaju osigurati uvjete u školi za ostvarivanje istih. Tradicionalna pedagogija koja prevladava u školama danas, na žalost, svojim organizacijskim elementima rijetko osigurava uvjete nužne za ostvarivanje optimalnih i vrhunskih iskustava u školi. [This paper brings in relation the theory of self-actualization (by Abraham Maslow), the theory of optimal experience (by Michael Csikszentmihaly) and the opportunities for their realization at school. Maslow (1963) recognizes superior experience and Csikszentmihaly (2006) the moments of rapture as the moments of genuine happiness and self-realization/self-actualization. Maslow, as well as Lev Vigotsky (1978), recognizes the key influence of socio-cultural environment on child development as a precondition for the development and self-actualization of the individual. Having in mind the child’s proximal development and his aspiration for actualization it is necessary to bring closer school experience to superior experience or to rapture as much as possible, in order to enable as successful participation of pupils at school as possible. Reform pedagogues like Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, John Dewey and Maria Montessori even more than a hundred years ago recognized the situations at school when children experienced optimal experience and by their actions they tried to provide conditions at school for realization of this experience. Traditional pedagogy that prevails at schools today, unfortunately, by its organizational elements rarely provides conditions necessary for the realization of optimal and superior experience at school.]

Language: Croatian

ISSN: 1330-0059

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

La formazione degli insegnanti nell’approccio montessoriano: il dibattito nelle pagine di La Coltura Popolare (1911-1922) / Teacher’s Training in the Montessori Approach: The Debate on the Pages of La Coltura Popolare (1911-1922)

Available from: Rivista di Storia dell’Educazione

Publication: Rivista di Storia dell’Educazione, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 59-71

Europe, Italy, La Coltura Populare (Periodical), Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Società Umanitaria (The Humanitarian Society), Southern Europe, Teacher training

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Abstract/Notes: In the first two decades of the Twentieth Century, reflections on teacher training were particularly rich, implying the lively and significant participation of a plurality of actors. Even Maria Montessori actively participated in this debate and the meeting with the Humanitarian Society in Milan, and with Augusto Osimo primarily, proved to be very fruitful on these issues. The specialist magazine La Coltura Popolare represents a faithful and interesting mirror of this relationship and of the many reflections and initiatives arose from it, promoting the propagation of the Montessori method and offering at the same time a space for dialogue and comparison of all the most innovative and vivifying voices of the pedagogical reflection of the time. This paper proposes a first and partial reconstruction of the significant role that La Coltura Popolare played, from 1911 to 1922, in soliciting the attention of its public on the topic of teacher training, in spreading the Montessori method, in stimulating a not biased and preconceived comparison between different approaches, experiments and views on childhood.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.36253/rse-10385

ISSN: 2532-2818

Doctoral Dissertation

Formação de professores no contexto das propostas pedagógicas de Rudolf Steiner (pedagogia Waldorf), Maria Montessori e da experiência da Escola da Ponte [Teacher training in the context of the pedagogical proposals of Rudolf Steiner (Waldorf pedagogy), Maria Montessori and the experience of Escola da Ponte]

Available from: Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho" - Institutional Repository

Americas, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Montessori schools, South America, Teacher training, Waldorf method of education - Teacher training, Waldorf schools

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Abstract/Notes: O objetivo desta pesquisa foi investigar como ocorre o processo de formação de professores para atuar no contexto das propostas pedagógicas Waldorf, Montessori e experiência da Escola da Ponte, com enfoque em cursos de formação para cada uma destas propostas. Os dados foram coletados através da participação da pesquisadora como aluna de cursos de formação para cada uma das propostas, ocorridos nos períodos de 2009 a 2013, trabalho de campo em escolas que adotam as propostas referidas, conversas com professores, sete entrevistas e um questionário, com professores e/ou formadores que atuam ou atuaram nestas propostas. Os dados foram registrados em notas de campo expandidas e as entrevistas foram gravadas em áudio e transcritas. O material foi interpretado e discutido de forma qualitativa, segundo um caráter etnográfico interpretativo. Todo esse processo foi apresentado através de narrativas que revelaram a experiência vivida pela pesquisadora tanto nos cursos de formação quanto nas escolas e, também, discussões que explicitaram como ocorre o processo de formação de professores para atuar nas três propostas, destacando como o ensino de Matemática foi abordado nestas formações. Foi realizada uma reflexão sobre os temas que emergiram. Na proposta Waldorf, destacamos os pressupostos teórico-filosófico-metodológicos que a embasam, o autoconhecimento (conhecimento de si mesmo), as artes e o professor de classe (professor generalista). No método de Maria Montessori salientamos os pressupostos teórico-filosófico-metodológicos que o embasam e sua consequente atualização, a importância da prática/estágio e o autoconhecimento. Na experiência da Escola da Ponte sobressaiu-se a formação centrada na escola (destaque para o círculo de estudos). A pesquisa contribui com discussões para a formação de professores que Ensinam Matemática, apontando, em especial, para a formação interior do professor através do conhecimento de si mesmo, vertente que é considerada nas propostas Waldorf e Montessori. [The aim of this research was to investigate how the process of teacher training occurs to act in the context of the Waldorf, Montessori and Escola da Ponte pedagogical proposals, focusing on training courses for each of these proposals. Data were collected through the participation of the researcher as a student of training courses for each of the proposals, which took place in the periods from 2009 to 2013, fieldwork in schools that adopt the aforementioned proposals, conversations with teachers, seven interviews and a questionnaire, with professors and/or trainers who work or have acted on these proposals. Data were recorded in expanded field notes and interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. The material was interpreted and discussed qualitatively, according to an interpretive ethnographic character. This entire process was presented through narratives that revealed the experience lived by the researcher both in training courses and in schools, and also discussions that explained how the process of teacher training occurs to act in the three proposals, highlighting how the teaching of Mathematics was addressed in these trainings. A reflection was carried out on the themes that emerged. In the Waldorf proposal, we highlight the theoretical-philosophical-methodological assumptions that underlie it, self-knowledge (self-knowledge), the arts and the class teacher (generalist teacher). In Maria Montessori's method, we emphasize the theoretical-philosophical-methodological assumptions that underlie it and its consequent updating, the importance of practice/internship and self-knowledge. In the experience of Escola da Ponte, education centered on the school stood out (highlight for the study circle). The research contributes to discussions for the formation of teachers who Teach Mathematics, pointing, in particular, to the inner formation of the teacher through self-knowledge, an aspect that is considered in the Waldorf and Montessori proposals.]

Language: Portuguese

Published: São Paulo, Brazil, 2015

Report

Evaluation of Prekindergarten Head Start. Year End Report, 1975-1976.

Available from: ERIC

Child development, Children with disabilities, Classroom environment, Classroom environment, Early childhood education, Head Start programs, Nongraded schools, Observation (Educational method), Parent-teacher relationships, Prepared environment, Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: The Philadelphia Prekindergarten Head Start program is a child development program for three and four-year-old children from low income families which stresses an interacting and multi-disciplinary attempt to improve the child's physical and emotional health, his family relationships, and his abilities to function better as a person. The program was designed from the beginning to implement five different early childhood educational models (Bank Street, Behavior Analysis, Montessori, Open Classroom, and Responsive Learning). The 1975-1976 evaluation activities for Philadelphia's Prekindergarten Head Start program continued to focus on the major goals for children. There was found to be some range in practices among centers in terms of (1) extent of model implementation, (2) classroom differences within a model, (3) number of parent volunteers, (4) grouping practices, and (5) provisioning. Observation data yielding the above information are summarized according to model and across the total program. The Denver Developmental Screening Test (D.D.S.T.) was administered during October and April to 82% and 84% of the population respectively. In April only 1.8% of the population was identified as having a developmental delay as defined by the D.D.S.T., a decrease of about 40% from the Fall administration. While Prekindergarten Head Start children are from families of low socio-economic status, the April D.D.S.T. results confirmed, as was the case in 1974-1975, that the population screened had improved after a year of program participation so that there were far fewer children "at risk" than were found in the norming population. (Author/MV)

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jul 1976

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