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1645 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Roleplaying to Develop Self Regulation

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research study investigated the use of child-led play in an after school club as a means to reduce peer conflict and increase cooperation. Prior literature suggests that children behave differently during imaginative play and exhibit greater natural behavior regulation when adult involvement is limited or removed. A small group of child participants, aged 9-14 years, were given materials necessary for a roleplaying game where players take on imaginary characters and cooperatively complete dangerous quests. One child acted as game leader, designing the adventure’s challenges and providing rules adjudication. The children attended six game sessions and completed questionnaires after each meeting. I recorded incidents of conflict between children and rated each game tables' self-management of disagreement. The children also provided verbal feedback in large group discussions. This study indicated that child conflict decreased over time while child awareness increased. Additionally, the children enjoyed their participation. The children who acted as game leaders experienced the greatest change in awareness, resulting in higher expectations of their fellow students. This study has convinced me to incorporate more child-led activity in curricular and extracurricular scenarios. The empathy and self-awareness that grew from leadership during free-play proved the children's good use of independence.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Report

Evaluation of the Prekindergarten Head Start Program 1979-1980. Technical Summary

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Abstract/Notes: Oriented toward a direct instructional routine in preparation for regular school, the Philadelphia Prekindergarten Head Start Program (PKHS) provides experiences to counter-balance effects of social and economic disadvantagement; parent involvement; staff development; and special supportive services. It employs five instructional models: Bank Street, Behavioral Analysis, Montessori, open classroom, and responsive learning. Observations indicate that children's activities usually emphasized language and social developmental skill areas, while adults were primarily observed in group leader or direct teacher roles. When tested against the Developmental Behavior Checklist, PKHS children accomplished approximately the same number of items as the total prekindergarten population. During the course of the program the number of children identified as developmentally "delayed" or "suspicious" decreased by 50 percent. It also appears that the program has a positive lasting effect on children's scores on standardized tests through grade 5. Children enrolled in the program received extensive psychological, nutritional and social services during 1979-80. Parent involvement in the program was high in both classroom participation and policy or planning meetings. Staff development was also a major component of the program. Over 70 percent of staff attended more than five workshops during the year. (Author/AEF)

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jan 1981

Book

A Strategy for Fighting the War on Poverty (The Montessori Method as Applied to the Brookhaven Project)

Available from: ERIC

Early childhood education, Lena L. Gitter - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: The basic goal of the program will be the development of the full potential of each child. The program also seeks an increase of parental awareness and understanding of the values of education and the parents' responsibility for their children's education. The town of Brookhaven seeks to mobilize all community resources, services, and facilities to the end of accomplishing the goals and objectives of this project. The goals of the proposed curriculum are: to help each child develop a positive self image, and encourage in each child the foundation for independent thought and action; to develop in each child an awareness and understanding of his environment; to improve communication skills, perceptual awareness, and motor coordination, increasing the level of each child's readiness for school achievement and participation in community activities; to develop in each child the ability to think quantitatively; to understand the structure of the number system and the logic of arithmetic operations; to foster aesthetic values through experiences in art and music; and, to promote good health in the children and encourage physical development. Practical life experiences must be provided for the child whose home may be lacking in the equipment, materials, or tools he will encounter outside that home. They involve all of the operations necessary for keeping the classroom and equipment in good working order.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: Homer Fagan Press, 1968

Edition: Revised Edition

Article

Dr. Montessori to Prolong Stay

Available from: Chronicling America (Library of Congress)

Publication: Washington Evening Star (Washington, D.C.)

Pages: 5

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, Panama-Pacific International Exposition (1915, San Francisco, California), United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Dr. Maria Montessori, the Italian educator, has decided to remain in the United States longer than she originally contemplated, according to word received by those interested in the Montessori system in this city. The purpose of her stay, perhaps lengthened by the participation of Italy in the was, it is thought, is to conduct an international Montessori training course at the Panama-Pacific exposition."

Language: English

Article

When Sensory Sensitivity Requires Intervention: Assessment and Treatment of Sensory-sensitive Children

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 38-43

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In other words, observers must look at the sensory stimuli in a given environment at the time a behavior occurs (Williamson & Anzalone, 2001). [...]diagnosis requires extensive observation of a child across multiple environments over time. Over time and with frequent reinforcement, a child can demonstrate growth in a range of areas and behaviors as a result of a successful course of therapy; for example, a child experiencing numerous hypersensitivities might show improvements in motor planning, more participation in activities with peers, more flexibility in eating a variety of foods, and/or less fear related to gross-motor activities (Schaaf & Nightlinger, 2007). If these techniques are utilized consistently, OTs believe student behaviors and performance can improve in many concrete, measurable areas, ranging from general attention, focus, and behavior to self-calming, quality of academic work, fine-motor skills (including handwriting), and memory retention. [...]OTs also emphasize the importance of consistent, ongoing communication between therapists, parents, and teachers of children who are receiving SI therapy, in order to maximize the benefit of therapy and provide reinforcement of therapy techniques across a child's daily environments.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

La metodología Montessori en la educación física online: una experiencia en la educación inicial II

Available from: Conciencia Digital

Publication: ConcienciaDigital, vol. 5, no. 1.1

Pages: 1064-1078

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Abstract/Notes: Introduction. The application of teaching methodologies and styles according to the age and interests of the schoolchildren offers the opportunity to encourage their cognitive, motor, language, and socio-affective progress. In initial education minors, promoting their development from the context of Physical Education in online mode continues to be a great challenge. Target. Reflect on the importance of the applicability of the Montessori Methodology in the online Physical Education class at the initial level. Methodology. A descriptive, non-experimental methodology was used, with the use of theoretical and empirical methods. The population was made up of the entire existing universe, made up of students from 3 to 5 years old, parents and teachers of Basic General Education of the Guayaquil Educational Unit. Results.1 The importance of the applicability of the Montessori Methodology is systematized at the initial level for the development of Physical Education classes in online mode. 2. It became evident that there are difficulties for the development of Physical Education classes through the online modality, among other aspects because not all teachers master the methodology and adequate forms of teaching in this modality and, on the other hand, because the students who integrating this level manifest demotivation, fear of carrying out activities in online mode, as well as difficulties with connectivity and access to technology for which they require family support. 3. It is necessary to train teachers and parents on the use of the Montessori methodology. Conclusions. The Montessori Methodology is essential for the development of Physical Education classes in online mode, it allows reducing the existing gaps between the level of competencies of teachers and parents and at the same time stimulates the participation of students in the classes.

Language: Spanish

DOI: 10.33262/concienciadigital.v5i1.1.2050

ISSN: 2600-5859

Article

Muddy Waters: Effective School-to-Family Communication During Uncertain Times

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 33, no. 4

Pages: 22-29

Americas, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, School administrators, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Pretend Play as Twin Earth: A Social-Cognitive Analysis

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Developmental Review, vol. 21, no. 4

Pages: 495-531

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Abstract/Notes: Pretend play appears to be important to a theory of mind, but exactly how or why has been controversial. One widely entertained hypothesis about why pretense is important to understanding minds is termed the Metarepresentational Model. According to this model, children knowingly consider and manipulate mental representations during pretense. Children appreciate these mental representations as such and later come to apply their understanding of mental representation outside of pretense domains. This article reviews evidence relevant to the metarepresentational model, and it is concluded that the evidence does not support it. Alternative models of the relationship between pretense and theory of mind are reviewed, culminating in a proposed developmental model of the relation. The Twin Earth model proposes specific relations between pretend play and understanding minds, from the ontogenesis of pretense to the later emergence of role play and mental representational understandings of pretense. Central to the proposal is the supposition that pretend play functions for children in much the way that Twin Earth functions for philosophers—by allowing for participation in and reasoning about nonactual situations.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1006/drev.2001.0532

ISSN: 0273-2297

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

Available from: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Publication: Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 2

Pages: 265-274

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Abstract/Notes: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-2102

ISSN: 0031-4005, 1098-4275

Doctoral Dissertation

Utilizing Montessori-Based Occupational Therapy Interventions for People with Dementia

Available from: St. Catherine University

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method for dementia is a specific approach to dementia care that can be implemented as an alternative to pharmaceutical intervention with its focus on purposeful and meaningful doing. Montessori-based interventions that were found effective in increasing self-feeding for people with dementia included activities requiring hand-eye coordination, scooping, pouring and squeezing. For this project, there were five participants from a residential care facility. This study consisted of doing activities or exercises to simulate eating right before mealtime. This occurred three times per week for eight weeks. The broad long-term purpose of this project was to increase participation in the daily occupation of self-feeding for people with dementia in residential care facilities. Montessori-based occupational therapy interventions could provide caregivers with an evidence-based strategy to deal with eating difficulties of people with dementia.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

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