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1645 results

Article

The Value of Regional Montessori Organizations

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 1-8

Americas, Montessori schools, North America, Organizations (Groups), School administrators, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author explains how administrators who have feelings about isolation and disconnection from other Montessori schools may find support and networking through a variety of ways. Administrators may connect with others through the AMS (American Montessori Society) Heads of Schools ListServer, a forum for discussion of topics interest to school administrators. Another means of meeting this need for support and networking is active participation in a regional Montessori organizations. The author cites several benefits offered by being active in regional Montessori organization activities.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Report

Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary school students, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This is the final report of the Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children begun in 1965 to investigate the effects of a modified Montessori program for disadvantaged children in the preschool and early elementary years. This report deals with the academic year 1969-1970, in which 29 disadvantaged children and a comparable group of 29 middle class children are the central focus of study. In addition, there is a followup on the school careers of disadvantaged children who attended Ancona at one time. A number of hypotheses about the potential effects of the project on the children's cognitive, social development are studied. Part I of the report deals with findings relative to the nursery school children, and includes a discussion of data from three measures of intellectual development (Stanford Binet, WPPSI and Merrill-Palmer) and from tester and teacher ratings of school-related behaviors and attitudes and social interaction. Part II details findings on the elementary school children and followup data on children who attended Ancona in previous years but are now elementary school students in other schools. In addition, data regarding children whose families have had long term involvement in the school is discussed. The appendix includes Ancona school Head Start program ratings of behavior during individual intelligence testing. (MS)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Aug 31, 1970

Report

Report of a Research and Demonstration Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children in the Ancona Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Classroom environment, Early childhood education, Classroom environment

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Abstract/Notes: A preschool experience was provided for lower-income negro children, and then their gains or losses in IQ and social integration were evaluated in terms of the type of the teaching method used. Thirty lower-income negro children and 17 middle-income negro and white children were separated into three groups and exposed to three teaching methods. Class one was unintegrated (all lower-income negro children) and non-Montessorial in methodology. It was the most unrestricted in terms of teacher control. Class two as integrated and non-Montessorial, but teacher control and restriction was more evident. Class three was integrated and Montessorial. The pupils here were the most disciplined and controlled. A thorough study was made of these classroom procedures, teaching techniques, and pupil activities. The results of the Stanford Binet intelligence tests showed no significant iq gain among the groups or within a group from test one at the beginning of the eight-week summer session to test two at the end of the session. But individual gains appeared. These were found to be an inverse function of distractibility. A winter pre-school session, with new pupils and using only the Montessori method, resulted in IQ gains. This was attributed to an improved classroom atmosphere. In general, the sessions did increase the children's readiness to begin school work and helped them to gain social confidence. Encouraging parental interest and participation was a collateral aspect of the programs. (WD)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1966

Report

Evaluation of Prekindergarten Head Start. Year End Report, 1975-1976.

Available from: ERIC

Child development, Children with disabilities, Classroom environment, Classroom environment, Early childhood education, Head Start programs, Nongraded schools, Observation (Educational method), Parent-teacher relationships, Prepared environment, Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: The Philadelphia Prekindergarten Head Start program is a child development program for three and four-year-old children from low income families which stresses an interacting and multi-disciplinary attempt to improve the child's physical and emotional health, his family relationships, and his abilities to function better as a person. The program was designed from the beginning to implement five different early childhood educational models (Bank Street, Behavior Analysis, Montessori, Open Classroom, and Responsive Learning). The 1975-1976 evaluation activities for Philadelphia's Prekindergarten Head Start program continued to focus on the major goals for children. There was found to be some range in practices among centers in terms of (1) extent of model implementation, (2) classroom differences within a model, (3) number of parent volunteers, (4) grouping practices, and (5) provisioning. Observation data yielding the above information are summarized according to model and across the total program. The Denver Developmental Screening Test (D.D.S.T.) was administered during October and April to 82% and 84% of the population respectively. In April only 1.8% of the population was identified as having a developmental delay as defined by the D.D.S.T., a decrease of about 40% from the Fall administration. While Prekindergarten Head Start children are from families of low socio-economic status, the April D.D.S.T. results confirmed, as was the case in 1974-1975, that the population screened had improved after a year of program participation so that there were far fewer children "at risk" than were found in the norming population. (Author/MV)

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jul 1976

Doctoral Dissertation

Formação de professores no contexto das propostas pedagógicas de Rudolf Steiner (pedagogia Waldorf), Maria Montessori e da experiência da Escola da Ponte [Teacher training in the context of the pedagogical proposals of Rudolf Steiner (Waldorf pedagogy), Maria Montessori and the experience of Escola da Ponte]

Available from: Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho" - Institutional Repository

Americas, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Montessori schools, South America, Teacher training, Waldorf method of education - Teacher training, Waldorf schools

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Abstract/Notes: O objetivo desta pesquisa foi investigar como ocorre o processo de formação de professores para atuar no contexto das propostas pedagógicas Waldorf, Montessori e experiência da Escola da Ponte, com enfoque em cursos de formação para cada uma destas propostas. Os dados foram coletados através da participação da pesquisadora como aluna de cursos de formação para cada uma das propostas, ocorridos nos períodos de 2009 a 2013, trabalho de campo em escolas que adotam as propostas referidas, conversas com professores, sete entrevistas e um questionário, com professores e/ou formadores que atuam ou atuaram nestas propostas. Os dados foram registrados em notas de campo expandidas e as entrevistas foram gravadas em áudio e transcritas. O material foi interpretado e discutido de forma qualitativa, segundo um caráter etnográfico interpretativo. Todo esse processo foi apresentado através de narrativas que revelaram a experiência vivida pela pesquisadora tanto nos cursos de formação quanto nas escolas e, também, discussões que explicitaram como ocorre o processo de formação de professores para atuar nas três propostas, destacando como o ensino de Matemática foi abordado nestas formações. Foi realizada uma reflexão sobre os temas que emergiram. Na proposta Waldorf, destacamos os pressupostos teórico-filosófico-metodológicos que a embasam, o autoconhecimento (conhecimento de si mesmo), as artes e o professor de classe (professor generalista). No método de Maria Montessori salientamos os pressupostos teórico-filosófico-metodológicos que o embasam e sua consequente atualização, a importância da prática/estágio e o autoconhecimento. Na experiência da Escola da Ponte sobressaiu-se a formação centrada na escola (destaque para o círculo de estudos). A pesquisa contribui com discussões para a formação de professores que Ensinam Matemática, apontando, em especial, para a formação interior do professor através do conhecimento de si mesmo, vertente que é considerada nas propostas Waldorf e Montessori. [The aim of this research was to investigate how the process of teacher training occurs to act in the context of the Waldorf, Montessori and Escola da Ponte pedagogical proposals, focusing on training courses for each of these proposals. Data were collected through the participation of the researcher as a student of training courses for each of the proposals, which took place in the periods from 2009 to 2013, fieldwork in schools that adopt the aforementioned proposals, conversations with teachers, seven interviews and a questionnaire, with professors and/or trainers who work or have acted on these proposals. Data were recorded in expanded field notes and interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. The material was interpreted and discussed qualitatively, according to an interpretive ethnographic character. This entire process was presented through narratives that revealed the experience lived by the researcher both in training courses and in schools, and also discussions that explained how the process of teacher training occurs to act in the three proposals, highlighting how the teaching of Mathematics was addressed in these trainings. A reflection was carried out on the themes that emerged. In the Waldorf proposal, we highlight the theoretical-philosophical-methodological assumptions that underlie it, self-knowledge (self-knowledge), the arts and the class teacher (generalist teacher). In Maria Montessori's method, we emphasize the theoretical-philosophical-methodological assumptions that underlie it and its consequent updating, the importance of practice/internship and self-knowledge. In the experience of Escola da Ponte, education centered on the school stood out (highlight for the study circle). The research contributes to discussions for the formation of teachers who Teach Mathematics, pointing, in particular, to the inner formation of the teacher through self-knowledge, an aspect that is considered in the Waldorf and Montessori proposals.]

Language: Portuguese

Published: São Paulo, Brazil, 2015

Article

Elementary Physical Education

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 28, no. 1

Pages: 85-104

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Abstract/Notes: Suggests a Montessori elementary level physical education program that provides outlets combining physical and mental energies as well as moral and social awareness. Includes daily scheduling that avoids disruption of work cycle with different daily activities. Suggests the arrangement of key lessons, a healthy attitude toward competition, practical hints for implementing the program within a prepared environment, and ways to modify games for participation within a multi-age group. (Author/KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Using the Montessori Approach for a Clientele with Cognitive Impairments: A Quasi-Experimental Study Design

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: International Journal of Aging and Human Development, vol. 71, no. 1

Pages: 23-41

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The choice of activities responding to the needs of people with moderate to severe dementia is a growing concern for care providers trying to target the need for a feeling of self-accomplishment by adapting activities to the abilities of elderly patients. The activities created by Maria Montessori seem to be adaptable to this clientele. This study evaluates the short-term effects, as compared to regular activities offered in the milieu. This is a quasi-experimental study where each of the 14 participants was observed and filmed in two conditions: during Montessori activities, during regular activities, and one control condition (no activity). The results show that Montessori activities have a significant effect on affect and on participation in the activity. They support the hypothesis that when activities correspond to the needs and abilities of a person with dementia, these positive effects are also observed on behaviours. This study enabled its authors to corroborate the findings presented in the literature and to contribute additional elements on the positive effects of the use of Montessori activities and philosophy. Used with people with moderate to severe dementia these allow the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, their well being, and hence, on their quality of life.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2190/AG.71.1.b

ISSN: 1541-3535, 0091-4150

Article

Communicating with the Family for the Child's Best Chance for Success

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 3

Pages: 121-129

Academic achievement, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, Teacher-student relationships, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Joachim Dattke describes a holistic approach to supporting the needs of the family when a child has a disability. The parent and child benefit from a two-pronged approach: working with doctors, psychologists, and therapists in clinic-based settings, and working with educators in schools and parent-child groups. He defines the importance of developing a personalized learning environment that implements specific aids and attainable objectives for each child. Approaching parents with empathy elicits the change of perspective that is needed for the family to understand how the child sees the world. Professor Dattke gives special appreciation to the Montessori educator who can "identify critical development periods in the child and look for objects and action sequences that the child may be interested in" and who prevent social exclusion by actively involving children in their social environment. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Building the Inclusive Montessori Community," Phoenix, AZ, January 16-19, 2014. Translation and editing assistance provided by Barbara Luborsky and Catherine Nehring.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Group Flow and Group Genius

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 3

Pages: 29-52

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Abstract/Notes: Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing team mates, good communication, and being progress-oriented. Collaboration is an essential ingredient of group flow and is vital to the Montessori classroom. The author has included a notes section with bibliographic information. [Reprinted with permission from chapter 3 of "Group Genius: The Creative Power of Collaboration." New York: Basic Books. Copyright 2007 by Keith Sawyer.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Report

Evaluation of the Prekindergarten Head Start Program 1979-1980. Technical Summary

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Abstract/Notes: Oriented toward a direct instructional routine in preparation for regular school, the Philadelphia Prekindergarten Head Start Program (PKHS) provides experiences to counter-balance effects of social and economic disadvantagement; parent involvement; staff development; and special supportive services. It employs five instructional models: Bank Street, Behavioral Analysis, Montessori, open classroom, and responsive learning. Observations indicate that children's activities usually emphasized language and social developmental skill areas, while adults were primarily observed in group leader or direct teacher roles. When tested against the Developmental Behavior Checklist, PKHS children accomplished approximately the same number of items as the total prekindergarten population. During the course of the program the number of children identified as developmentally "delayed" or "suspicious" decreased by 50 percent. It also appears that the program has a positive lasting effect on children's scores on standardized tests through grade 5. Children enrolled in the program received extensive psychological, nutritional and social services during 1979-80. Parent involvement in the program was high in both classroom participation and policy or planning meetings. Staff development was also a major component of the program. Over 70 percent of staff attended more than five workshops during the year. (Author/AEF)

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jan 1981

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