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1697 results

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Listening to Young Learners: Applying the Montessori Method to English as an Additional Language (EAL) Education

Available from: Lancaster University

Language acquisition, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: With the current immigration and migration trends in Europe and worldwide, English as an Additional Language (EAL) education is becoming a prominent area of educational research. The discourse around EAL and social justice education has, until now, largely focused on primary, secondary, and post compulsory aged students. Preschool aged EAL children have been left out of the academic discourse. Pedagogical approaches need to be explored to marry EAL and social justice for preschool children. Maria Montessori’s pedagogical approach may be able to achieve this unity without compromising the language development that is desired. The following study is a piece of action research, applying the Montessori Method to a group of nine EAL children in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. The data gathered suggests that applying Montessori’s approach to EAL education, that of listening to the child and being attentive to hisher needs, gives autonomy to the student, and can promote social justice in preschool EAL education. Listening to the child occurs through ‘observation’ (attentiveness to the child), critical reflection of practice, and experimentation in education. In this way each child receives a customized education that has, at its foundation, respect for the child. Using ‘observation,’ field notes, and researcher reflections, it became apparent that young children are able to communicate their educational needs. TESOL outcomes were used to monitor the rate at which English was learned. Each language journey was vastly different, but regardless of the initial outcomes met, all children demonstrated increases in their comprehension and spoken English. It is important to recognize that children must be listened to and should be considered valued members in their education.

Language: English

Published: Lancaster, England, 2017

Article

Education as the Preparation for Adult Life: An Overview

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 36, no. 3

Pages: 179-185

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

The Role of Diversity and Inclusion in Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 3, 7

Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Richard A. Ungerer - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: From the Executive Director

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Fernhaven Studio and Montessori Educational Environments

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 7

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Language: English

Article

Analysis of Emotional Factors in Montessori Children Education / Montessori 아동교육의 감성적 요소에 대한 고찰

Available from: RISS

Publication: Montessori교육연구 [Montessori Education Research], vol. 10

Pages: 1-15

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-9417

Article

From Cosmic Education to Civic Responsibility

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 3

Pages: 19-28

Cosmic education, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Bookending her article with questions for the Montessori practitioner, Judith Cunningham provides a theoretical overview of how the Montessori child is empowered to enact social change and is inspired to work for the betterment of the world. Cunningham lays the foundation by describing the world in which Maria Montessori lived and how the events of her time shaped her work and thinking. She discusses the importance of the unity that is formed through Cosmic Education and how important this unity becomes to the mission of the adolescent, "By understanding his cosmic task, his contribution to the preservation and betterment of the world, and with the ultimate goal of creating true peace, the child is empowered." [This talk was presented at the NAMTA Adolescent Workshop at the AMI/ USA Refresher Course, February 17-20, 2017 in Austin, TX.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Creative Giftedness and Educational Opportunities

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Publication: Educational and Child Psychology, vol. 30, no. 2

Pages: 79-88

Comparative education, Europe, France, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: In contrast to intellectual giftedness reflected in high academic performance and often measured by IQ tests, there is growing recognition that other forms of giftedness exist. This paper focuses on creative giftedness, defined as high potential to produce work that is original and context appropriate. After a brief introduction to the psychological basis of creative giftedness, the role of school context in the development of creative potential is highlighted. Then an empirical study suggesting that creative potential is influenced by educational context is presented; pupils attending traditional and Montessori schools in France were compared on a set of creativity tasks in both the graphic and verbal domains. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted as children were seen at two measurement occasions, with approximately one year delay. Results indicated greater scores on measures of creative potential for children in the Montessori context. The discussion situates the results in a broader context of issues concerning the development of creative giftedness through education.

Language: English

ISSN: 2396-8702, 0267-1611

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