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1780 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Character Education Literature of Bucket Filling Strategies on the Ability of 5-year-old Students to Self-Regulate in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research project was to explore how the implementation of bucket filling could affect self-regulation in 5-year-olds in a Montessori classroom. The bucket filling theme is character education children’s literature. The collection of data for this action research utilized a mixed method of quantitative and qualitative, including the pre- and post-Preschool Self-Regulation Assessment, daily observation reflections, and tally sheets of behaviors. The data collected and analyzed in this study use of bucket filling can have some effect on self-regulation skills in 5-year-olds in a Montessori classroom. Self-regulation is essential to success in the classroom and in the world at large, any intervention that supports self-regulation is vital for students and teachers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Building a Cohesive Classroom: The Effects of Music on Cooperation and Community in a Public, Lower Elementary, Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: The following research assesses how the daily integration of singing and listening to music helps to construct a socially cohesive, cooperative and joyful classroom during clean up time. This study combined group singing opportunities, a music listening station and music played during clean up time. The songs used for this study included lyrical themes of cooperation, happiness, overcoming obstacles and/or friendship. The thirty-day study involved twenty-one participants between the ages of six and nine at a public, Montessori school in Missouri. Each individual completed a pre- and post-survey, as well as a survey each time they used the music listening station. During clean up time, observations were taken daily to record instances of helpful behaviors and joy amongst the participants. Results of the surveys showed that the intervention was successful at increasing positive experiences during clean up time and including a Music Listening Station as an available work choice. The intervention was not successful in creating positive experiences when singing together as a group. Further research may include the use of other mediums to promote community and collaboration like the fine arts, sports or other group oriented activities.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Outdoor Activity on Concentration

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project examined how the incorporation of outdoor activities impacted the concentration of children in a primary Montessori classroom. Twenty-one children, between the ages of three and six years old, participated in the research for six weeks. The researcher facilitated daily morning nature walks for the whole group, as well as, invited children to participate in individual and small group presentations on outdoor work. The researcher collected data using daily observational notes and observational tally sheets, a self-reflection journal, and a post-implementation student survey. The data numbers reflect an increase in concentration during the study. Pre-intervention, 72% of children showed signs of concentration and the average weekly percentage of children concentrating throughout the study was 87%. At a 13-17% increase, the change was substantial and reflects a positive outcome. The action plan concludes future researchers may consider incorporating fewer outdoor activities at once or extend the time frame of the intervention.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Engaging in Food Prep on Willingness to Try New Food

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project sought to determine the effects implementing food prep activities in the Montessori primary classroom (ages 2.5-6) had on children’s willingness to try new food. Before the food prep activities were implemented, parent questionnaires and student conferences were used to better understand the children’s food preferences. During the intervention, tally sheets and observation forms were used to track student participation and their reactions to the foods. After the intervention, additional parent questionnaires were distributed and student conferences were conducted to determine current food preferences of the four foods that were included in the food prep activities. The results indicate that engagement and participation in food prep and cooking lessons increased children’s willingness to try new food. Future research is needed to determine if implementing similar strategies in the home will support children’s willingness to try new food.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Doctoral Dissertation

A Study of Pre-School Education in the Republic of Ireland with Particular Reference to Those Pre-Schools Which are Listed by the Irish Pre-School Playgroups Association in Cork City and County

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Ireland, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, Preschool education

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Abstract/Notes: This study was undertaken in order to investigate the activities which took place in Irish pre-schools other than those within the formal school system. The principle focus of the research concerned the degree to which the pre-school children were being 'cognitively stretched' by the curriculum in which they were engaged. The social, linguistic, physical and creative development of these children was also considered.An historical review of the theory of play and recent research in this area was undertaken.Twenty-three pre-schools were taken at random from the membership list in Cork city and county of the Irish Pre- School Playgroups Association. One pre-school which was not a member was added. Prior to embarking upon the study, a history of the I.P.P.A. was given.The ethnographic research strategy was found to be the most suitable method of assessing empirically the nature and frequency of play in the pre-school. This study, which took place between 1986 and 1990, was therefore eclectic in nature, employing a multi-faceted approach encompassing a target child observational schedule, interviews, a study of classrooms, a questionnaire and an interaction analysis system.Briefly, the results showed that the 157 children engaged in this study were being cognitively stretched for approximately one quarter of the time if they were in a playgroup and approximately one half of the time if they were in a Montessori setting. Social and linguistic behaviour was limited by the actions of the pre-school leaders and physically or creatively challenging behaviour was rarely observed. The fact that the children played alone for half of the total time spent in the pre-school was most striking.The most important finding to emerge from the study of language in the twenty-four pre-schools was the fact that the children rarely communicated verbally. Dialogue was almost non-existent and children's questions were very sparse. In order to place the above in a National context, a questionnaire was sent in 1990 to a random sample of one hundred I.P.P.A. members in the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland. Unfortunately, only 39 responded. However, of note was that approximately 25% of playgroup leaders had degrees and four-fifths of them were mothers in their mid-thirties. They strongly disagreed with the teaching of the 3Rs and felt that much more government money should be devoted to playgroups and in-service training for their personnel.

Language: English

Published: Hull, England, 1993

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Nature Work in a Primary-Aged Montessori Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigated how children responded to participating in twenty minutes of nature-based activities that involved direct contact with dirt. The study took place in a Primary Montessori school with 27 children ages 3 to 6 years. The research was conducted over a six-week period in which a pre-assessment was conducted in the first week, followed by four weeks that consisted of presenting 20 minute Nature Work lessons on a daily basis. Once children were shown how to use the materials, data was collected regarding their participation and independent use of the materials. In addition, daily journaling by the researcher was completed to document self-reflection of children's responses to Nature Work. During the sixth week, a post-assessment was conducted to indicate whether the Nature Work intervention influenced the children's interest in connecting and engaging more deeply with nature. Results of the research suggest that the children's participation increased over the duration of the intervention. However, the perceived interest/enjoyment decreased slightly, according to the responses to the Pre- /Post-Assessment questions. The children remained engaged and interested in participating in the Nature Work options: Bulb Planting, Seedling boxes, Transplanting Plants and Worm Composting. A longer study is recommended to increase opportunity for participation in the Nature Work intervention and increase data collection.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Report

An Analysis of Activities in Preschool Settings. Final Report

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Abstract/Notes: This research was aimed at an analysis of classroom activities which make up educational programs for young children. Its broad purpose was to analyze systematically and to make comparisons among six preschool programs in order to describe the patterns of activity settings used; the objectives activity settings were designed to reach from the point of view of their designers, classroom teachers; and the social behaviors of teachers and children which are shaped and molded by the requirements of settings and which have not necessarily been planned for or recognized by teachers. The six preschool settings used for the study include a Montessori nursery school, a Head Start program, two laboratory nursery school classrooms, a franchise day care center, and a community day care center. The first section of the report contains discussion of related research, a theoretical model, the six preschool classrooms, and the research procedures. The presentation of the results comprises the rest of the report. The findings are divided into three parts: a quantified picture of six classrooms in terms of activity characteristics and social interaction; an exploration of the relations between the activity and social interaction values; and an examination of the relationship of the personal characteristics of the children to activity participation and social interaction. (SDH)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1973

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Pencil Grasp Exercises on Handwriting in Sixth Grade Resource Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of pencil grasp exercises on the handwriting of sixth-grade resource students. This action research project took place in a public middle school resource classroom located on the outskirts of a suburb. The six-week study had seventeen student participants, ranging between the ages of eleven and twelve years. During the study, the researcher collected data on the placement of the hand and fingers on the pencil, grasp, legibility, letter placement, fluency, and perception of abilities. The data utilized pre and post questionnaires, observations, matrixes, and assessments. Results showed that sixth-grade resource students could change their pencil grasp. Additionally, the data indicated that fluency decreases when legibility and placement increases. Further studies could identify if the change in grasp would decrease hand cramping, how long the decline in fluency lasts, and if the increase in legibility is long term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Supporting Narrative Writing Proficiency and Engagement in a Montessori Upper Elementary Classroom through the Writing Workshop Model and 6+1 Traits of Writing

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project set out to determine the effects of daily writing workshop lessons, including the 6+1 Traits of Writing vocabulary, on student writing proficiency and engagement. An upper elementary classroom of 17 students, consisting of nine fourth graders and eight fifth graders, in an independent, suburban Montessori school participated in this study. Students completed a five-week narrative writing unit from Calkins, Ochs, & Luick’s (2017) Up the Ladder curriculum. The teacher-researcher collected data through observation, writing prompts scored using a 6+1 Traits of Writing rubric, student feedback forms, Bottomley, Henk, & Melnick’s (1997/1998) Writer Self-Perception Scale, and small group feedback sessions. The data suggested that students, particularly weaker writers, made gains in writing proficiency. Further research is necessary to determine if students would be more engaged in writing than other subjects and if classrooms with a full three-year age span would make similar gains in writing proficiency.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Student Constructed Formative Assessment in the Elementary Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Montessori method of education, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project studied how student-created formative assessments in mathematics would affect student confidence and perceived math ability. Students participated in a four-week study. The researcher conducted this study in September and October of 2021. The seven participating students were from an Upper Elementary classroom in a private Southern California Montessori school. The intervention consisted of a student-constructed survey taken weekly and a group analysis of the anonymized data collected from the said survey. Additional data sources included parent surveys, end-of-intervention student surveys, and classwork observational tally sheets. This study found that students gained further awareness of their work choices by completing the student-constructed formative assessments and reviewing the data. In the future, educators could conduct further research regarding the impact of using student-created formative assessment long-term and with a wider variety of subjects

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

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