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386 results

Doctoral Dissertation

An Examination of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Antibias-Antiracist Curriculm in a Montessori Setting

Available from: Lynn University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Abstract/Notes: The research consisted of a qualitative case study of three urban public Montessori schools with a population of 51% or more of students of color and a commitment of 2 years or more of CRP-ABAR within a Montessori setting. The theoretical framework used for the study was the critical race theory, which is the conceptual foundation for examining inequities in public education. This research dissertation had a focus on gaining an insight into the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents toward CRP-ABAR in Montessori schools by examining the practices in three public Montessori schools. The possible connections to student outcomes, such as behavioral referrals, suspension rates, and academic achievement for students of color were explored to determine if any connections exist between CRP-ABAR and outcomes for students of color within a public Montessori setting. Three major themes emerged of the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents about the impact of the CRP-ABAR in a Montessori setting. The CRP-ABAR could be delivered through a curriculum-oriented approach or a systemic-oriented approach and the CRP-ABAR connects to Montessori through peace-global education and the prepared teacher-environment. The CRP-ABAR practices impact students of color primarily through social emotional growth with limited academic outcomes. Even with an intentional focus and diversity training, many non-Black teachers’ perceptions of students of color included deficit theory thinking. Some parents believed racism is being dismantled through the curriculum and celebrations of diversity. Other parents identified some teachers-staff with underpinning instances of biases and insensitivity.

Language: English

Published: Boca Raton, Florida, 2020

Book

International Handbook of Holistic Education

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Abstract/Notes: Providing a comprehensive overview of holistic education’s history, conceptions, practices, and research, this Handbook presents an up-to-date, global picture of the field. Organized in five sections, the Handbook lays out the field’s theoretical and historical foundations; offers examples of holistic education in practice with regard to schools, programs, and pedagogies at all levels; presents research methods used in holistic education; outlines the growing effort among holistic educators to connect holistic teaching and learning with research practice; and examines present trends and future areas of interest in program development, inquiry, and research. This volume is a must-have resource for researchers and practitioners and serves as an essential foundational text for courses in the field.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: Routledge, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-351-62189-2

Article

Beyond Executive Functions, Creativity Skills Benefit Academic Outcomes: Insights from Montessori Education

Available from: PLoS Journals

Publication: PLoS ONE, vol. 14, no. 11

Neuroscience

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Abstract/Notes: Studies have shown scholastic, creative, and social benefits of Montessori education, benefits that were hypothesized to result from better executive functioning on the part of those so educated. As these previous studies have not reported consistent outcomes supporting this idea, we therefore evaluated scholastic development in a cross-sectional study of kindergarten and elementary school-age students, with an emphasis on the three core executive measures of cognitive flexibility, working memory update, and selective attention (inhibition). Two hundred and one (201) children underwent a complete assessment: half of the participants were from Montessori settings, while the other half were controls from traditional schools. The results confirmed that Montessori participants outperformed peers from traditional schools both in academic outcomes and in creativity skills across age groups and in self-reported well-being at school at kindergarten age. No differences were found in global executive functions, except working memory. Moreover, a multiple mediations model revealed a significant impact of creative skills on academic outcomes influenced by the school experience. These results shed light on the possibly overestimated contribution of executive functions as the main contributor to scholastic success of Montessori students and call for further investigation. Here, we propose that Montessori school-age children benefit instead from a more balanced development stemming from self-directed creative execution.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0225319

ISSN: 1932-6203

Article

Finding Our Purpose in Life: An Interview with Derreck Kayongo

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 1

Pages: 48-51

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Derreck Kayongo is an entrepreneur and the former CEO of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. The organization battled global health issues in 90 countries, and hygiene-related diseases, and the resulting deaths have dissipated in many at-risk communities. In his talk, "Harnessing Your Power to Create Change," he will share his visionary ideas about creating an environment in which everyone is empowered to thrive. Through the Global Soap Project, I am proud to say that we have been able to provide soap where it is needed and to be able to be part of what they call WASH programs (water, sanitation, and hygiene) by big NGOs like CARE International, World Vision, and the United Nations.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Classroom Solutions for Sensory-Sensitive Students

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 2

Pages: 45-49

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, Sensory disorders in children, Sensory integration dysfunction in children, Special education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Soon after No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation was signed into law in the U.S. (2002), an increasing emphasis in schools on high-stakes testing performance resulted in a decrease in recess and movement time, including physical education for Elementary students (Ohanian, 2002). Since the hazard of unmonitored television time was first explored by Marie Winn in The Plug-In Drug (1977, revised 2002), the allure of screens too early and too often has only become an increasing challenge for both parents and educators. Providing dedicated time for movement and nature are important general guidelines for parents and educators to remember, but there are also classroom-based tools available that teachers can implement into the school day to promote sensory health and positive behaviors in their students. Some individual tools that could be set up in the classroom to be utilized by students, perhaps even as a classroom work or on a "sensory shelf," might include the following: * Hand-size fidgets and squeeze balls of varying textures and firmness levels; * Headphones (noise-canceling, silent or with music); * Lap weights; * Fine-motor activities that allow for accommodations and sensory variety (e.g., sensory table, Practical Life, and art works); * Colored glasses (to mute visual input or block flickering of fluorescent lights); * Stretch/resistance bands; * Massage balls or a foam roller; * Chewing tools (pencil toppers, pendants, gum, etc.).

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Emerging Psychological Characteristics of Farm Life

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 256-83

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Argues farming can teach the populace that human existence has purpose and dimension beyond material acquisition. Emphasizes the proper balance between nature and culture, word and deed, tragedy and therapy, shame and guilt which leads to the formation of an informed, humane, and stable citizen. Includes response on the relationship of this balance to Montessori's Erdkinder concept. (Author/SD)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Color Blind or Color Brave?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 1

Pages: 14

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In our current climate of racial tension and fear of international and domestic terrorism, Maria Montessori's belief that "education is the best weapon for peace" (Montessori, 1992, p. 30) is vital for our children's future as global citizens.[...]at AMS-accredited Brooklyn Heights Montessori School, in Brooklyn, NY, strives to provide a positive and safe venue for difficult conversations around race and socioeconomic differences for students and their parents.Maria Montessori's belief that "education is the best weapon for peace" (Montessori, 1992, p. 30) is vital for our children's future as global citizens.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Bringing the Biosphere Home

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 179-208

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses an orientation to the local environment as the lens through which to detect global change. Discusses how students can relate to a structure that includes the intertemporal, interspatial, intergenerational, and interspecies realities of place leading to a comprehensive view of biology. Discusses the existential tensions intrinsic to contemplating global environmental change between creation and extinction, indifference and wonder, hope and foreboding, and faith and doubt. (KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Do Not Bequeath a Shamble; The Child in the Twenty-First Century: Innocent Hostage to Mindless Oppression or Messenger to the World?

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 93-106

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Abstract/Notes: This reprint of a 1980 article argues that there is a unique global consciousness inherent in the "prepared environment" of Maria Montessori's student-centered, nurturing curriculum for young children. Maintains that war and peace, overpopulation, hunger, environmental problems, and other global concerns can be addressed through education. (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

La Scuola dell’Infanzia nel Canton Ticino: Sviluppi Storici et Modelli Pedagogici [The Nursery School in the Canton of Ticino: Historical Developments and Pedagogical Models]

Available from: Universität Bern

Publication: Schweizerische Zeitschrift fuer Bildungswissenschaften / Swiss Journal of Educational Research, vol. 25, no. 2

Pages: 211-234

Europe, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: In the Italian speaking canton of Tessin there has been a wide range of pedagogical methods used in pre-school education. Among those are: the «Asilo infantile», «kindergarten», the «Casa dei bambini montessoriana» and the «Scuola materna» models. In the last decade a further and newly defined model has been developed. It is called the «scuola dell’infanzia» or «Childhood school» which has been adopted in the official «Orientamenti prommatici» or «Education Program Guidelines» for the year 2000.The new model aims to combine and harmonise the most outstanding characteristics of the past models into an education process adequately designed to deal with the child’s needs inside the “Scuola dell’infanzia”. It takes into account the child’s verbal and non verbal com-munication, their emotional and affective life, their behaviour and cognitive sphere.The current work describes, through key questions, the steps taken and the reasons which lead to the current «Scuola dell’infanzia». A description of the strengths and a critical view of the still pending challenges is also reported to show where potential improvements are needed. Furthermore a specific list of observation points is given to describe how the school sees its capability to deal with many challenges. Among these challenges are the child’s needs including social needs, the ability of the teaching staff to be at the same wavelength as their educational tasks and the continuity of the education system between the «scuola dell’infanzia» and the Elementary school along with the specific pedagogical tools.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.24452/sjer.25.2.4661

ISSN: 2624-8492

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