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19 results

Article

Building Abstractions with Sensory Education Seminar Papers

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

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Language: English

Article

The Egg Man and the Empress

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 17, no. 3

Pages: 50-54

Educational change, Educational history, Educational philosophy, Educational Philosophy, Experiential learning, Montessori method of education, Social Class, Teaching methods, ⛔ No DOI found, Teaching Methods, Thinking Skills

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author compares the legacies of two remarkable educators--John Dewey and Maria Montessori. These include changes in education now so commonplace that is accepted as traditional. Both Montessori and Dewey lived long enough to see their ideas receive worldwide recognition and acceptance, along with a share of misunderstanding and rejection. Over 50 years after their death, both are enjoying renewed popularity. The differences in their thought lie in the philosophical and educational thinking which are reflected in their different milieus. Dewey was a thorough American secular Democrat with egalitarian values and ideals while Montessori reflected the class consciousness and noblesse-oblige of Italian Catholic society. However, both of them share a primacy in the idea of the role of "the hand" in education. For Dewey, it represents the importance of always trying initial learning to hands-on experience. Similarly, Montessori believed that all learning should start with concrete hands-on experience and progress to abstraction. Both Montessori and Dewey recognized the value and importance of manual labor. Also, the role of memorization in education receives an equal lack of plaudits from both Montessori and Dewey. The former clearly separated memorization from abstraction. She considered it more as a necessary means to other ends, without much inherent interest. While the steps to abstraction gave form to the Montessori curriculum, the process of problem solving was essential to Dewey's "projects education." Memorization and recitation only took meaning as a helpful part of this process.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Creative Engagement: Handwork as Follow-Up Work

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 121-137

Handicraft

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Abstract/Notes: "To a great extent, we all must "do" in order to learn." Ellen Lebitz begins with this overarching truth as a lead-in to a close look at handwork in the elementary environment. She explains the benefits of handwork for the second-plane child, including it being a key to helping "even the most distracted children find focus and interest." She gives concrete examples of handwork (mostly as follow-up work) along with tips for implementation, including maintaining a clean-up routine and having materials organized and available. She addresses teamwork in handwork, issues of scale, and poses handwork as a grounding route to abstraction. Supported by invaluable tools for the teacher to use, her enthusiasm and experience with this work shines through as encouragement to be prepared and, most importantly, to trust in the child: "It would be so easy to just assume that we know what the best follow-up is, but the children need to be free to figure out themselves what they are interested in and on what they want to work. Once we make a particular project an expectation, then we are taking away the 'spontaneous' part of the spontaneous activity in education. We have to make peace with the idea that some follow-up will be not as we expect, will fizzle out, but, sometimes, will exceed our wildest expectations. All of this is part of the process; we have to let go of our 'favorite' projects and let the children be free." [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Finding the Hook: Montessori Strategies to Support Concentration," October 6-9, 2016, in Columbia, MD.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Place and Pedagogy

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 38, no. 1

Pages: 183-188

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Abstract/Notes: David Orr's classic article links education to living in the outdoors and studying all disciplines through the unifying lens of place. Pedagogy of place counters abstraction, it is the natural world embodying principles of learning that involve direct observation, investigation, experimentation, and manual skills. Place is the laboratory providing the hands-on materials through the diversity of the habitat and its messages through a community experience. Emphasis is placed on human history, social science, political science, geology, biology, etc. as creating a "complex mosaic" that widens perceptions about applications of the disciplines and deepens the perception of time. Mr.Orr's article ties into Montessori education and the role of nature in the development of the older elementary child and adolescent. [This article was reprinted from David Orr "Ecological Literacy: Education and Transition to a Postmodern World." New York: State University of New York Press, Albany, 1992: 125-131.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Cosmic Education

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 38, no. 1

Pages: 119-132

Cosmic education, Margaret Elizabeth Stephenson - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Margaret Stephenson begins with the reasoning elementary child as he answers questions about "all things." She centers on the unity of knowledge, leading "from the whole via the parts back to the whole." Imagination is enhanced to bring abstraction to an engaging and lofty motivation, and the elementary self is referred to as the "atom of the spirit." Miss Stephenson moves from the early "sensory" exploration of the three to six prepared environment to the language of its parts, flowing through names, then communication of ideas, and finally the languages of world, invention, and human keys to understanding. [Reprinted from "AMI Communications," n 1, 1993, pages 14-28. Copyright 2011 AMI/USA. Reprinted with permission.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Quelques aspects de la genese du raisonnement mathematique chez l'enfant [Some aspects of the child's development of mathematical reasoning powers / Einige Aspekte der Entstehung des Mathematischen Denkens beim Kinde]

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Review of Education, vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 197-207

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Abstract/Notes: L'étude génétique de la pensée enfantine, dont on a montré quelques aspects dans le domaine mathématique, vérifie l'assertion, courante aujourd'hui, que l'enfant doit agir pour comprendre. Elle apporte cependant des renseignements supplémentaires sur les processus d'abstraction qui interviennent à partir de l'action.

Language: French

DOI: 10.1007/BF01433369

ISSN: 1573-0638, 0020-8566

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Preschool: Preparation for Writing and Reading

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Annals of Dyslexia, vol. 47

Pages: 241-256

Children with disabilities, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, Learning disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Dr. Maria Montessori was a perceptive observer of the learning processes of children, and nowhere is this revealed more clearly than in her approach to language. She viewed reading as the ultimate abstraction of language rather than a specific skill to be taught. Decoding is the skill to be taught. The concept of indirect and direct preparation for learning is of major importance in the rich heritage she gave us. She saw the existence of an epigenesis of intellectual functioning, which implies that the experiential roots of a given schema, or learned behavior, will lie in antecedent activities that may be quite different in structure from the schema to be learned. She used this principle effectively. This article discusses how Montessori's method and materials address the indirect and direct preparation for learning written language.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s11881-997-0028-4

ISSN: 0736-9387, 1934-7243

Book

Direct Verbal Instruction Contrasted with Montessori Methods in the Teaching of Normal Four-Year-Old Children

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Abstract/Notes: This study compares the effects of Montessori methods of instruction and methods of direct verbal instruction. Montessori methods rely on the ability of the child to learn through physical interaction with inanimate objects and minimize verbal behavior by teacher and student, while the direct verbal method works mainly through language use, both in the teacher's presentation and the child's responses. In this research project, the Montessori group was made up of 17 upper-middle class 4-year-olds who had already participated in the program for a year. The direct verbal group, called the Academic Preschool, was comprised of 18 4-year-olds from backgrounds similar to those of the Montessori group. All the children were pre- and posttested on the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities and posttested on the Wide-Range Achievement Test (reading, arithmetic and spelling). There were no significant between-group differences at pretest, and posttest total ITPA scores were about the same as the pretest scores. The subtest differences in the second testing favored the Academic Preschool on tests involving abstraction and the Montessori group on tests of simple recognition or memory. The Academic preschool children outscored the Montessori children in all areas of the Achievement Test.

Language: English

Published: [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1969

Book Section

Understanding Dimensions

Book Title: Creative Development in the Child: The Montessori Approach

Pages: 72-76

Abstraction, Asia, Dimensions, South Asia, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori lectured in Italian during the first International Montessori Course in 1939 at Madras, India. These 75 lectures were translated into English by her son Mario, as she spoke. And were taken down near verbatim in short hand, transcribed and set into galleys overnight. One such set of proofs forms the original manuscript for this book. For the most part, each chapter in this book encompasses a single lecture. The lectures are left in the same order as they were given, swinging between psychology and the use of the materials. India’s diversity of language, social custom and religious practice enriched her research. During this time, Dr. Montessori worked with children in Madras and put into practice her theories of adapting the environment, furniture and the Practical Life materials to local conditions. In these lectures, Maria Montessori speaks with the mature wisdom of a lifetime spent studying, not just early childhood, but human development as a whole and gives a complete, wonderful and colorful overview of her pedagogy and philosophy.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-52-1

Series: The Montessori Series , 24

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