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70 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Proverbs and Formulaic Sequences in the Language of Elderly People with Dementia

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 10, no. 4

Pages: 603-623

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Some types of formulaic (routine and familiar) language seem to remain fairly intact in people with language and memory disturbances, making it a useful tool fo...

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1471301211413338

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of a Culturally Adapted Group-Based Montessori-Based Activities on Engagement and Affect in Chinese Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: BMC Geriatrics, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: Article 24

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, China, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method underpinned by the principle of person-centered care has been widely adopted to design activities for people with dementia. However, the methodological quality of the existing evidence is fair. The objectives of this study are to examine the feasibility and effects of a culturally adapted group-based Montessori Method for Dementia program in Chinese community on engagement and affect in community-dwelling people with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/s12877-020-01967-0

ISSN: 1471-2318

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Intervention for Individuals with Dementia: Feasibility Study of a Culturally Adapted Psychosocial Intervention in Pakistan (MIRACLE)

Available from: Cambridge University Press

Publication: BJ Psych Open, vol. 6, no. 4

Pages: e69

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Pakistan, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Globally, nearly two-thirds of people with dementia reside in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet research on how to support people with dementia in LMIC settings is sparse, particularly regarding the management of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Understanding how best to manage these symptoms of dementia with non-specialist approaches in LMICs is critical. One such approach is a non-pharmacological intervention based on the Montessori method. To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally adapted, group-based Montessori intervention for care home residents with dementia and their study partners, who were paid care workers in Pakistan. This was a two-stage study: a cultural adaptation of the Montessori intervention and a single-arm, open-label, feasibility and acceptability study of 12 participant dyads. Feasibility and tolerability of the intervention and study procedures were determined through the recruitment rate, adherence to the protocol and acceptance of the intervention. Qualitative interviews were undertaken with the study partners. A pre–post exploratory analysis of ratings of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, functional ability and quality of life were also conducted. The recruitment and retention rates of people with dementia were acceptable, and the intervention was well tolerated by participant dyads. Findings show a reduction in agitation levels and improvement in mood and interest for the activities. Feasibility studies of low-cost, easy-to-deliver and culturally adapted interventions are essential in laying the groundwork for subsequent definitive effectiveness and/or implementation trials for dementia in LMICs, where awareness and resources for dementia are limited.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1192/bjo.2020.49

ISSN: 2056-4724

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Study Protocol: A Montessori Approach to Dementia-related, Non-Residential Respite Services in Australia

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 77

Pages: 24-30

Alzheimer's disease, Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Given the social burden and significant cost of dementia care in Australia, finding evidence-based approaches that improve outcomes, maintain independence, and reduce the impact on patients and families is essential. Finding effective ways to train and assist the healthcare staff who support these individuals is also critical, as they are considered to be at risk of workplace stress, burnout, and other psychological disturbances which negatively affects standards of care. The current paper describes a protocol for evaluating the effects of a Montessori-based approach to dementia care, in non-residential respite centres. An 18 month prospective observational, cohort controlled design is suggested that will compare participants from a community respite service that has undergone a Montessori-based workplace culture change and those from a service that provides a person-centred ‘care as usual’ approach. To achieve this, the protocol includes the assessment of participants across multiple variables on a monthly basis including the cognitive, behavioural, and emotional functioning of clients with dementia, levels of caregiver burden experienced by informal carers, and burnout, compassion satisfaction and workplace engagement among respite staff. The protocol also employs a qualitative evaluation of program fidelity. This approach will provide further insight into the potential benefits of early intervention with Montessori approaches for persons living with dementia in the community, their caregivers, and the staff and volunteers who assist them.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2018.03.013

ISSN: 0167-4943

Article

Montessori and Dementia: A New Vision

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 76

Pages: 38–40

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Mealtimes for Dementia: A Pathway to Person-Centred Care

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 21, no. 4

Pages: 1098-1119

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: PurposeThis study examined the impact of a Montessori mealtime intervention for people living with dementia to support the mealtime experience of residents and mealtime care practices of staff in a memory support unit. The mealtime intervention was part of a broader culture change project.MethodAn observational research design was used to evaluate changes in the mealtime experience and care practices across three time points (baseline, post-implementation, maintenance), spanning 30 months. Five video recordings of the lunch time service (range: 19?32 min) were analysed. The coding protocol comprised pre-determined indicators related to accepted dimensions of person-centred care. Resident and staff behaviours were quantified across four categories: providing choice and preferences, promoting the social side of eating, supporting independence and showing respect towards residents. Staff behaviours that reflected personal enhancing actions and personal detractors were also coded during each mealtime service.ResultsA significant increase in staff providing residents with the opportunity for choice and a subsequent significant increase in residents demonstrating choice behaviours was evident. Staff and residents both significantly increased their interactional behaviours, with greater social interaction between staff and residents. Staff further demonstrated greater support for mealtime independence that reached and maintained significance during the final two sampling points. Significant gains observed post implementation were largely maintained and, on specific measures, further increased over time. A significant increase in staff use of personal enhancing actions during mealtime care was also evident. Variability in individual staff and resident behaviour highlighted the complexity of mealtime care and culture change processes.ImplicationsThe study provides novel evidence to support the use of a Montessori mealtime intervention to achieve more person-centred mealtime care, and which resulted in a more respectful, enabling and social dining experience. Clinical implications and direction for future research are presented to build on these findings.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/14713012211057414

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

Montessori and Dementia: A New Frontier

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 2

Pages: 6

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Richard A. Ungerer - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: [...]we can also use the Montessori method to improve the quality of life of individuals with memory disorders, particularly Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.While Montessori doesn't offer a cure for Alzheimer's, Montessori practitioners are uniquely positioned to create enriching environments, using Montessori materials, and offer patients music activities, art therapy, and gardening projects designed to engage the senses and increase engagement in and enjoyment of their daily lives.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effectiveness of Environment-Based Interventions for People with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias

Available from: American Journal of Occupational Therapy

Publication: AJOT: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 65, no. 5

Pages: 514-522

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: A systematic review of evidence for the efficacy of environment-based interventions on the affect, behavior, and performance of people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias was conducted as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Evidence-Based Literature Review Project. Thirty-three reports met inclusion criteria. Results suggest that ambient music, aromatherapy, and Snoezelen® are modestly effective in reducing agitation but do not consistently have long-term effects. Visually complex environments that give the illusion of barriers deter people from wandering to unsafe places but do not reduce the urge to wander. Evidence that bright light therapy can aid in regulating mood and the sleep–wake cycle and thus help people remain awake during the day is preliminary. Montessori-based programming can be useful in matching activities to the person’s remaining skills. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effect, contraindications, and best dosages of these interventions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5014/ajot.2011.002600

ISSN: 0272-9490, 1943-7676

Book Section

Fourth Age Learning for Persons Living with Dementia

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Third International Handbook of Lifelong Learning

Pages: 1-19

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter focuses upon that interface between lifelong learning and older persons living with dementia (PLWD). Reviewing the area of fourth age learning – that is, learning initiatives for older persons living with physical and/or cognitive health challenges – it argues that late-life learning requires a distinctive geragogical perspective that is separate from pedagogical and andragogical principles for children and adults, respectively. This is especially warranted for PLWD who often cannot speak, not in control of their thoughts or body, and in different “irrational” relations to objects around them, and hence, necessitate a theoretical and methodological perspective that makes it possible for facilitators to validate and explore the significance of silence by focusing closely on space and visuals. While learning interventions for PLWD are marked by eclectic curricula – that range from information and communication technology, participatory arts, vocational skills to Montessori-based programming – most are limited by an excessive preoccupation with enabling the participants to restore their old “self” while overlooking how they can engage in creative activities introduced naturally through conversation and/or reminiscence. The post-humanist approach offers much potential for the planning, implementation, and interpreting of lifelong learning in dementia settings as it allows arts-based, visual, sensory, movement, and sonic practices to produce beneficial outcomes for post-verbal participants such as PLWD. Moreover, it acknowledges that successful learning initiatives in dementia care settings are premised on the facilitator’s capacity to skillfully connect with the participants and introduce activities at a pace that suited their abilities and interests.

Language: English

Published: Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2022

ISBN: 978-3-030-67930-9

Series: Springer International Handbooks of Education

Doctoral Dissertation

Utilizing Montessori-Based Occupational Therapy Interventions for People with Dementia

Available from: St. Catherine University

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method for dementia is a specific approach to dementia care that can be implemented as an alternative to pharmaceutical intervention with its focus on purposeful and meaningful doing. Montessori-based interventions that were found effective in increasing self-feeding for people with dementia included activities requiring hand-eye coordination, scooping, pouring and squeezing. For this project, there were five participants from a residential care facility. This study consisted of doing activities or exercises to simulate eating right before mealtime. This occurred three times per week for eight weeks. The broad long-term purpose of this project was to increase participation in the daily occupation of self-feeding for people with dementia in residential care facilities. Montessori-based occupational therapy interventions could provide caregivers with an evidence-based strategy to deal with eating difficulties of people with dementia.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

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