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99 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Study Protocol: A Montessori Approach to Dementia-related, Non-Residential Respite Services in Australia

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 77

Pages: 24-30

Alzheimer's disease, Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Given the social burden and significant cost of dementia care in Australia, finding evidence-based approaches that improve outcomes, maintain independence, and reduce the impact on patients and families is essential. Finding effective ways to train and assist the healthcare staff who support these individuals is also critical, as they are considered to be at risk of workplace stress, burnout, and other psychological disturbances which negatively affects standards of care. The current paper describes a protocol for evaluating the effects of a Montessori-based approach to dementia care, in non-residential respite centres. An 18 month prospective observational, cohort controlled design is suggested that will compare participants from a community respite service that has undergone a Montessori-based workplace culture change and those from a service that provides a person-centred ‘care as usual’ approach. To achieve this, the protocol includes the assessment of participants across multiple variables on a monthly basis including the cognitive, behavioural, and emotional functioning of clients with dementia, levels of caregiver burden experienced by informal carers, and burnout, compassion satisfaction and workplace engagement among respite staff. The protocol also employs a qualitative evaluation of program fidelity. This approach will provide further insight into the potential benefits of early intervention with Montessori approaches for persons living with dementia in the community, their caregivers, and the staff and volunteers who assist them.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2018.03.013

ISSN: 0167-4943

Doctoral Dissertation

Utilizing Montessori-Based Occupational Therapy Interventions for People with Dementia

Available from: St. Catherine University

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method for dementia is a specific approach to dementia care that can be implemented as an alternative to pharmaceutical intervention with its focus on purposeful and meaningful doing. Montessori-based interventions that were found effective in increasing self-feeding for people with dementia included activities requiring hand-eye coordination, scooping, pouring and squeezing. For this project, there were five participants from a residential care facility. This study consisted of doing activities or exercises to simulate eating right before mealtime. This occurred three times per week for eight weeks. The broad long-term purpose of this project was to increase participation in the daily occupation of self-feeding for people with dementia in residential care facilities. Montessori-based occupational therapy interventions could provide caregivers with an evidence-based strategy to deal with eating difficulties of people with dementia.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Master's Thesis

Impact of Montessori-Based Dementia Programming on Engagement and Affect of Older Adults with Dementia

Available from: University of San Francisco

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted the Adult Day Services program and Adult Day programs across the country. As the Adult Day Services program transitions to an in-person format, goals within the organization include developing appropriate programming, increasing group size, and keeping clients entertained. The framework guiding this quality improvement project is Montessori-Based Dementia Programming ® (MBDP). This project aims to increase client engagement, decrease client anxiety, and decrease staff workload. This will be measured by a self-developed staff workload survey, the Menorah-Park Engagement, and the Affect rating scale. Implementation of MBDP at the Adult Day Center did not meet all projected goals, however benefits of MBDP were observed. The benefits of MBDP include improved affect and engagement of clients when participating in MBDP.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2022

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Efficacy of Memory Training Using Montessori Philosophy-based Activities in Mild Dementia Elderly

Available from: Thai Journals Online

Publication: Journal of the Psychiatric Association of Thailand, vol. 54, no. 2

Pages: 197-208

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, Gerontology, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: AbstractObjective: To compare the memory scores in mild dementia elderly who attended Montessori-based Memory training with the control group who did not.Method: The Solomon four-group design was used to test the memory of the subjects. The subject of the study consisted of 40 elderly at Banbanglamung Social Welfare Development Center for Older Persons. Participants were divided to 2 experimental and 2 control groups by random sampling technique. Mini mental status Exam-Thai 2002 and Thai Geriatric Depression scale were used as a tool in selecting the subject and a tool to differentiate the mild dementia elderly group from the depressed group. The digit span and digit symbol subtests of The Wechsler Intelligence scale were used in memory testing. The data obtained was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, t-test and one-way ANOVA.Results: The average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups and the controlled groups were significantly different (p<0.05). After 4 weeks of training, the average scores ofthe experimental groups increased more than that of the controlled group. After training, the average scores of memory of the four groups were significantly indifferent (p<0.05). Digit symbol scores of the experimental groups were higher than of the controlled groups by using LSD method.Conclusion: After memory training, the average scores of the digit span and digit symbol of the experimental groups were significantly higher than the controlled group. This differentce still persistedat the 12th week of training. Therefore, this memory training should be used with the elderly to prevent and delay dementia.

Language: Thai

ISSN: 2697-4126

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Use of Montessori-Based Activities for Clients with Dementia in Adult-Day Care: Effects on Engagement

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 15, no. 1

Pages: 42-46

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Clients with dementia in an adult day care center were observed taking part in regular activities programming or Montessori-based activities developed for persons with dementia. During the nine-month study, clients in Montessori-based activities exhibited greater amounts of constructive engagement, defined as motor or verbal behavior exhibited in response to the activity in which the client was taking part, than clients in regular programming. Montessori-based activities also elicited less passive engagement, defined as listening and/or looking behavior exhibited in response to the activity the clients were participating in, than regular programming. Implications of these results and ways to implement Montessori-based programming in settings serving persons with dementia are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/153331750001500105

ISSN: 1082-5207, 2162-9986

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of a Culturally Adapted Group-Based Montessori-Based Activities on Engagement and Affect in Chinese Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: BMC Geriatrics, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: Article 24

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, China, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method underpinned by the principle of person-centered care has been widely adopted to design activities for people with dementia. However, the methodological quality of the existing evidence is fair. The objectives of this study are to examine the feasibility and effects of a culturally adapted group-based Montessori Method for Dementia program in Chinese community on engagement and affect in community-dwelling people with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/s12877-020-01967-0

ISSN: 1471-2318

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Positive Interactive Engagement (PIE): A Pilot Qualitative Case Study Evaluation of a Person-Centred Dementia Care Programme Based on Montessori Principles

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 19, no. 4

Pages: 975-991

Alzheimer's disease, Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Altered behaviour associated with dementia can present a number of challenges in the provision of care within both community and residential aged care settings. This paper presents a qualitative case study investigation of the implementation of the Positive Interactive Engagement programme within a residential aged care setting. The Positive Interactive Engagement programme incorporates non-pharmacological sensory techniques that have been informed by a person-centred, Montessori approach. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews with workers at a residential aged care facility in South Australia yielded seven case studies. Data were thematically analysed both within and between cases. Our data indicate the programme demonstrates underlying Montessori principles and supports participant behaviour change, with a noted reduction in ‘disruptive’ behaviours and increased social connection amongst participants. Programme staff report increased job satisfaction. The Positive Interactive Engagement programme offers a model that demonstrates encouraging outcomes, and further research would be useful in ascertaining whether these outcomes translate to quantifiable improvements in the quality of life for people with dementia in a residential aged care setting.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1471301218792144

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Method in Dementia Care

Available from: Care Info

Publication: Journal of Dementia Care, vol. 20, no. 4

Pages: 18-19

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Ten years ago Tom and Karen Brenner developed a new approach to caring for people with dementia – Montessori for Dementia Care. Here, they explain their programme and training for care staff

Language: English

ISSN: 1351-8372

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori-Based Activities as a Transgenerational Interface for Persons With Dementia and Preschool Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 366-373

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia have been used to successfully provide opportunities for programming between older adults and preschool children in shared site intergenerational care programs. Such intergenerational programming allows older adults with dementia to fulfill roles of teacher or mentor to younger children or as collaborative workmates for persons with more advanced dementia while providing children with positive one-on-one interactions with older adults. We review several studies using this approach; describe characteristics of the programs, participants, and results obtained; and provide recommendations for those interested in extending this line of work.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/15350770.2011.618374

ISSN: 1535-0770

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Using Acupressure and Montessori-Based Activities to Decrease Agitation for Residents with Dementia: A Cross-Over Trial

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 57, no. 6

Pages: 1022-1029

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: To explore the effectiveness of acupressure and Montessori-based activities in decreasing the agitated behaviors of residents with dementia. A double-blinded, randomized (two treatments and one control; three time periods) cross-over design was used. Six special care units for residents with dementia in long-term care facilities in Taiwan were the sites for the study. One hundred thirty-three institutionalized residents with dementia. Subjects were randomized into three treatment sequences: acupressure-presence-Montessori methods, Montessori methods-acupressure-presence and presence-Montessori methods-acupressure. All treatments were done once a day, 6 days per week, for a 4-week period. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, Ease-of-Care, and the Apparent Affect Rating Scale. After receiving the intervention, the acupressure and Montessori-based-activities groups saw a significant decrease in agitated behaviors, aggressive behaviors, and physically nonaggressive behaviors than the presence group. Additionally, the ease-of-care ratings for the acupressure and Montessori-based-activities groups were significantly better than for the presence group. In terms of apparent affect, positive affect in the Montessori-based-activities group was significantly better than in the presence group. This study confirms that a blending of traditional Chinese medicine and a Western activities program would be useful in elderly care and that in-service training for formal caregivers in the use of these interventions would be beneficial for patients.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2009.02271.x

ISSN: 1532-5415

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