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1645 results

Article

AMS Awards Teacher Education Scholarships

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 17

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Abstract/Notes: Applications-usually about 100 per cycle-are reviewed by a small AMS work group, under the leadership of the AMS Board of Directors Teachers Section chair (currently Suzanne Bayer).Since the program's inception, AMS has awarded over $550,000 to more than 200 aspiring teachers.MARYAM BEIRAMI (Early Childhood), Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, Silver Spring, MD SARAH BROWN (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO SAXON BROWN (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake St. Louis, MO NEUS CARMONA SAUS (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Goffstown, NH SARAH GALLEY (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Teacher Education/NC, Angier, NC MONICA GUCWA (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO *KRISTINE HABELMANN (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO MOLLY HARDY (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Goffstown, NH **DANIELLE HINES (Infant & Toddler), Virginia Center for Montessori Studies, Richmond, VA KAYLA IANNUZZO (Early Childhood), Summit Montessori Teacher Training Institute, Davie, FL FARZANA KHAN (Early Childhood), Dallas Montessori Teacher Education Program, Dallas, TX DEEPIKA KOTTE GANGODA THALAPITIGODAGE (Early Childhood), Midwest Montessori Teacher Training Center, Libertyville, IL CHRISTINA KRENICKI (Early Childhood), Northeast Montessori Institute, Warren, ME LAUREN LUND (Secondary I-II), Cincinnati Montessori Secondary Teacher Education Program, Cincinnati, OH KYLEE MEYER (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Education/NY, White Plains, NY EILYS ORTA (Infant & Toddler), Village Montessori Training Center, Miami, FL ALYNA PHETSINOR (Early Childhood), Midwest Montessori Teacher Training Center, Libertyville, IL ELISABETH ROSOFF (Infant & Toddler), West Side Montessori School, New York, NY LISA SCHAD (Elementary I-II), Montessori Elementary Teacher Training Collaborative, Arlington TAYLOR WEBB (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake St. Louis, MO *Scholarship awarded is from the Zell Family Scholarship Fund. **Scholarship partially funded by the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia: A Comparative Analysis of Alternative Models of Early Childhood Education

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 52, no. 3

Pages: 337-353

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Reggio Emilia approach (Early childhood education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia education remain three of the most popular models for alternative early childhood education. Each of these approaches has developed globally, with a rich history of supporting children’s educational freedom. This narrative analysis provides a means for early childhood educators and scholars to understand the aims, philosophical and theoretical frameworks, historical development, benefits, and challenges in these models and their methods of practice. As early childhood education evolves with technology and as re-conceptualizations about early education occur, an understanding of these alternatives to traditional education models is important. While adaptive options of these models may emerge in education systems across national contexts, this review allows educators to consider their applications and cultural appropriateness in specific local and community contexts.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s13158-020-00277-1

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

AMS Teacher Education Scholarships

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 25-26

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Applications-typically about 100 per cycle-are reviewed by a small AMS selection committee, under the leadership of the chair of the Teachers Section of the AMS Board of Directors-currently Suzanne Bayer.Since the scholarship program began in 1993, AMS has awarded over $587,000 to more than 300 aspiring teachers.Sarah Chase (Early Childhood), Northeast Montessori Institute, Wenham, MA **Cristal Garza (Early Childhood), Montessori Teacher Academy, Dana Point, CA *Abigail Goeller (Early Childhood), Adrian Dominican Montessori Teacher Education Institute, Adrian, MI Elizabeth Hill (Elementary I-II), Institute for Montessori Innovation at Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT Lisa Huff (Early Childhood), Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education, Covington, KY *Ada Kulbickaite (Elementary III), Duhovka Montessori Teacher Education Program, Prague 6, Czech Republic Estefanía Maldonada (Early Childhood), Palm Harbor Montessori Teacher Education Center, Palm Harbor, FL *Jessica Marshall (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO Erin Mergil (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Education I NY, New Rochelle, NY Shawnnee Miranda (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Newton, MA *Rebekah Moore (Early Childhood), Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education, Covington, KY Leah Park (Elementary I), Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, Silver Spring, MD Misty Pasco (Infant and Toddler), Mid-America Montessori Teacher Training Institute, Omaha, NE *Stephanie Powell (Early Childhood), Montessori Center for Teacher Education, San Diego, CA *Kimberly Torres (Elementary I-II), Institute for Montessori Innovation at Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT Mariah White (Elementary I), University of Wisconsin-River Falls Montessori Teacher Education Program, River Falls, WI Ashley Wooten (Early Childhood), Shelton Montessori Teacher Education Center, Dallas, TX Marah Zabibi (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake Saint Louis, MO *Scholarships partially funded from the Zell Family Scholarship Fund **Scholarship funded by the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund Scholarships were drawn from three sources, all administered by AMS: the AMS Living Legacy Scholarship Fund, for which monies were raised in honor of the 2016 Living Legacy, Carolyn Kambich; the Zell Family Scholarship Fund, established by Dr. Pamela Zell Rigg to honor the memory of her late mother, Agnes Kister, and her late brother, John Kister Zell; and the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund, established by an anonymous donor to honor Ms. Hammes' lifelong work as a Montessori educator.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Early Childhood Education in India: History, Trends, Issues, and Achievements

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 24, no. 1

Pages: 11-16

India, South

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Abstract/Notes: The changes in the social and economic structure of India have intensified the need for universal early childhood education. The formidable challenges before the Indian Government are: to provide high quality early childhood education programs; to preserve indigenous practices such as multilinguality, family/community involvement, participation of older children as caretakers of their younger siblings; and to provide early childhood education to all children despite serious financial constraints. This article presents a brief overview of the traditional childrearing practices in India, chronicles government initiatives in early childhood education, describes the range of programs available in India, and identifies goals that will shape the future of early childhood programs in India.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF02430544

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Doctoral Dissertation

Development of the Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory: An Instrument to Identify Preservice Teachers' Early Childhood Curricular Orientation

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study was to develop and field test an instrument that provides an efficient and scholarly tool for exploring curricular beliefs of preservice teachers in the area of early childhood education. The Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory (ECCBI) was developed through procedures that evaluated the content validity of identified statements, explored the criterion and construct validity, and assessed the internal reliability of the instrument. Through a literature review, four predominant approaches to early childhood education (Developmental Interaction, Cognitive Developmental, Behavioral, and Sensory Cognitive) and four associated models of implementation were identified (Developmental Interaction, HighScope, Direct Instruction, and Montessori). Six areas, in which each of the above differed, were identified: the view of the child, role of the teacher, resources utilized, curricular emphasis, assessment methodology, and characteristics of the learning environment. The aim of this study was to develop and field test an instrument that provides an efficient and scholarly tool for exploring curricular beliefs of preservice teachers in the area of early childhood education. The Early Childhood Curricular Beliefs Inventory (ECCBI) was developed through procedures that evaluated the content validity of identified statements, explored the criterion and construct validity, and assessed the internal reliability of the instrument. Through a literature review, four predominant approaches to early childhood education (Developmental Interaction, Cognitive Developmental, Behavioral, and Sensory Cognitive) and four associated models of implementation were identified (Developmental Interaction, HighScope, Direct Instruction, and Montessori). Six areas, in which each of the above differed, were identified: the view of the child, role of the teacher, resources utilized, curricular emphasis, assessment methodology, and characteristics of the learning environment. A panel of experts classified and sorted a total of 182 statements, and 72 items were subsequently organized into an instrument consisting of four subtests corresponding to the identified curricular models. Scoring of the instrument included recording Likert-scale responses for each statement to a score key divided into four sections, or subtests, representing each curricular model. Scores for each section were added and compared. The subtest with the lowest score was deemed most representative of a respondent's curricular beliefs. Data gathered through field testing of the instrument with practitioners were used to explore further content validity through a factor analysis, criterion validity, and construct validity. Results of a second field test of preservice teachers and the results of the first field test (practitioners) were used to assess internal consistency reliability. Analyses appeared to support content, criterion, and construct validity as well as reliability of the 72-item ECCBI. In an effort to reduce the length of the instrument and to make it less cumbersome, results of the factor analysis were used to create a 24-item shortened version of the ECCBI. Six items representing each of the four subtests having the strongest factor loadings were identified as appropriate statements and were then organized into an alternative instrument. Data gathered through field testing of the instrument with practitioners were used to explore further content validity through a factor analysis, criterion validity, and construct validity. Results of a second field test of preservice teachers and the results of the first field test (practitioners) were used to assess internal consistency reliability. Analyses appeared to support content, criterion, and construct validity as well as reliability of the 72-item ECCBI. In an effort to reduce the length of the instrument and to make it less cumbersome, results of the factor analysis were used to create a 24-item shortened version of the ECCBI. Six items representing each of the four subtests having the strongest factor loadings were identified as appropriate statements and were then organized into an alternative instrument.

Language: English

Published: Tallahassee, Florida, 2004

Master's Thesis

Unintended Consequences: The Montessori Story of the Early Childhood Education Qualification Requirement - 2000-2007

Available from: Victoria University of Wellington - Research Archive

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Abstract/Notes: In 2002, the Ministry of Education in New Zealand released Pathways to the Future: Nga Huarahi Arataki. This 10year strategic plan for early childhood education was the culmination of years of advocacy, research and consultation within the early childhood sector. A key component of the plan is a staged requirement for teachers in early childhood centres to have a Diploma of Teaching ECE or equivalent qualification. The study analyses the impact on the Montessori early childhood sector of the requirement that teachers in a centre be qualified with a Diploma or equivalent. This thesis draws on the results of a qualitative study involving interviews with key policy informants and focus groups of teachers and the story that emerges describes the complexities, frustrations and positive outcomes for centres and their teachers. The story points to a need for support, intervention and creative strategies to ensure no part of the early childhood sector is left behind, and diversity within early childhood education in New Zealand is maintained. The final outcome of the study raises the dilemma faced by the Montessori community; how can the approach accommodate the current ideas of early childhood education brought to centres through the policy requirement and remain identifiably Montessori?

Language: English

Published: Wellington, New Zealand, 2008

Article

Pemikiran Ki Hajar Dewantara dan Maria Montessori tentang Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini [The Thoughts of Ki Hajar Dewantara and Maria Montessori About Early Childhood Education]

Available from: Universitas PGRI Semarang (Indonesia)

Publication: PAUDIA: Jurnal Penelitian dalam Bidang Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini [Research Journal in the Field of Early Childhood Education], vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 17-35

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Ki Hadjar Dewantara - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southeast Asia, Taman Siswa

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Abstract/Notes: Mendalami ilmu pendidikan anak usia dini tidak dapat dilakukan apabila hanya mengkaji pemikiran satu tokoh saja. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui (1) pemikiran, (2) persamaan dan perbedaan pemikiran Ki Hajar Dewantara dan Maria Montessori tentang pendidikan anak usia dini. Metode yang digunakan kualitatif dengan jenis penelitian kepustakaan yang mengkomparasikan pemikiran kedua tokoh. Data dianalisis dengan pendekatan deskriptif. Penelitian dilaksanakan selama dua bulan mulai januari sampai februari 2020. Sumber data terdiri dari data primer dan sekunder. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan (1) pemikiran pendidikan anak usia dini menurut Ki Hajar Dewantara adalah pendidikan yang diberikan pada anak 0-7 tahun dengan pemberian pendidikan yang memperhatikan unsur alami anak dengan materi melatih panca indera menggunakan metode lahiriah dan batiniah dilakukan di lingkungan keluarga, sekolah dan masyarakat dengan tujuan mengembangkan cipta, rasa dan karsa pada anak. Menurut Maria Montessori pendidikan anak usia dini adalah pendidikan yang diberikan untuk anak 0-6 tahun dilakukannya dilingkungan sekolah dengan materi keterampilan sehari-hari menggunakan metode lahiriah dan batiniah yang memberikan kebebasan anak untuk memilih aktivitas dan media yang ingin digunakan. (2) persamaan dan perbedaan pemikiran Ki Hajar Dewantara dan Maria Montessori tentang anak usia dini terletak dari aspek nama dan filosofi sekolah, setting lingkungan, dasar pemikiran PAUD, metode dan tugas pendidik. [The science of early childhood education cannot be understood from one’s thought. This research intended to know (1) the thoughts (2) the similarities and differences of early childhood education thoughts by Ki Hajar Dewantara and Maria Montessori. The method used was qualitative with library research which compared two experts’ thoughts. The data was analyzed by descriptive approach. This research was done within two months, january to february 2020. The data were from primary and secondary data. The results revealed (1) Ki Hajar Dewantara states that early childhood education is an education given to 0-7 year old children and emphasizes on natural factors by training five senses through outward and inward method around family, school and community environments to develop creativity, feeling and intention. While Maria Montessori says that early childhood education is an education given to 0-6 year old children through daily skills in school environment and uses outward and inward method which let them choose activity and media they want. (2) the similarities and differences of Ki Hajar Dewantara and Maria Montessori thoughts were school’s name and philosopy, environment, ECE basic thoughts, learning method and educator’s duties.]

Language: Indonesian

DOI: 10.26877/paudia.v9i1.5610

ISSN: 2598-4047, 2089-1431

Doctoral Dissertation

Everyday Spirituality: Supporting the Spiritual Experience of Young Children in Three Early Childhood Educational Settings

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Child development, Comparative education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania, Spirituality, Waldorf schools

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Abstract/Notes: The focus of this research is the spiritual experience of young children in early childhood educational settings. Spirituality is included in the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki, but is a relatively unarticulated aspect of educational practice. In order to find out how spirituality is supported in early childhood educational contexts this qualitative case study research took place in three early childhood settings: a Montessori casa, a private preschool and a Steiner (Waldorf) kindergarten. The methods used in the research included participant observation, interviews and focus groups. The teachers were asked to make a video about spirituality to reflect their own context and photographs were taken in each setting. The metaphor of spiritual landscape is used in this research. In this landscape everyday experience merged with the spiritual to form the concept of everyday spirituality. The cultural theories of everyday life supported a realisation that ordinary daily activity can become wonderful and mysterious when the spiritual dimension is realised. The themes that emerged from analysis of the case studies are conceptualised as transformative aspects of learning and relationships. They are aspects of everyday spirituality identified as spiritual withness; spiritual inbetweenness; and the spiritually elsewhere. Representing spiritual experience is challenging. The thesis is written in narrative form and contains core narratives as prose and poems. Using writing as a means of discovery made communicating spirituality through the medium of words a possibility. Spirituality is proposed to be an inclusive concept that affirms a sense of connection and this thesis found that all pedagogical practices in early childhood settings have the potential to include a spiritual aspect. In Aotearoa New Zealand many children lead their everyday lives in the context of an early childhood environment that includes teachers and parents as part of that community. This thesis argues that when everyday spirituality permeates early childhood contexts that all aspects of the curriculum are realised and the spiritual experience of everyone connected to that setting is supported.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2007

Article

Perspectives in Early Childhood Education: Belize, Brazil, Mexico, El Salvador and Peru

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 2012, no. 1

Pages: 1-27

Americas, Belize, Brazil, Central America, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, El Salvador, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Peru, South America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education (ECE) provision is becoming a growing priority. During the past twenty years, Latin America has shown a growing recognition in the provision of educational programs for young children, birth to age eight, is essential. Urban and rural populations intimated in 2009, that many countries utilizing equitable access to quality early childhood programs is often seen by policy makers as a means of achieving economic and political goals (United Nations, 2012). Unfortunately, a pre-occupation with economic and political goals may conflict with the provision of quality programming for young children. In a number of Latin American countries provisions for educating young children exist as intent to provide quality services. The continuing challenge is to finance, organize and regulate those well-meaning intentions. The objective of this article is two-fold. First, to describe national policy efforts that regulate the education of young children consistently. And, second, to reflect the status of early childhood education programming; and to examine the possibilities for the improvement of the quality and accessibility of an education for all young children. Five Latin American nations have been chosen for examination, including: Belize, Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, and Peru. (Contains 4 tables.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Article

Achieving Inclusive Education in Early Childhood: From the Viewpoint of an Affinity Between Inclusive Education and Montessori Education

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], vol. 49

Pages: 100-113

Asia, East Asia, Inclusive education, Japan, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This is an article from Montessori Education, a Japanese language periodical published by the Japan Association Montessori.

Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

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