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Article

أثر التدريب علي أنشطة منتيسوري فى تنمية صورة الذات المدرکة لدى الأطفال ذوى اضطراب طيف التوحد ( دراسة حالة ) [The Effect of Training on Montessori Activities in Developing the Perceived Self-Image of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Case Study)]

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: دراسات في الارشاد النفسي والتربوي [Studies in Psychological and Educational Counseling]

Africa, Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Egypt, Inclusive education, Middle East, Montessori method of education, North Africa, Teacher training

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Abstract/Notes: هدفت الدراسة الحالية للتعرف على أثر أنشطة مونتيسوري في تنمية صورة الذات ( الکفاءة الاجتماعية – الکفاءة الشخصية ) المدرکة لدى الأطفال ذوي اضطراب طيف التوحد ( صورة الأم – صورة الأخصائي ) ، أجريت دراسة الحالة على ( 3 ) أطفال ذوي اضطراب طيف التوحد تتراوح أعمارهم من ( 4-6 ) سنوات ، وتم تطبيق أدوات الدراسة التى تشمل : مقياس صورة الذات المدرکة لدى الطفل ذوى اضطراب طيف التوحد (صورة الأم – صورة الأخصائي) – مقياس جيليام لتقدير اضطراب طيف التوحد – البرنامج القائم على أنشطة مونتيسوري للحياة العملية ، وتوصلت النتائج إلى : وجود أثر کبير لأنشطة مونتيسوري في تنمية صورة الذات ( الکفاءة الاجتماعية – الکفاءة الشخصية ) لدى الأطفال ذوي اضطراب طيف التوحد .The present study aimed to identify the effect of Montessori activities in developing the self-image (social competence - personal competence) perceived in children with autism spectrum disorder (the image of the mother -the image of a specialist). The case study was conducted on (3) children with autism spectrum disorder aged from (4 – 6) years, and the study tools were applied which include: the perceived self-image scale of a child with autism spectrum disorder (the image of the mother - the image of the specialist) - Gilliam Autism Rating Scale Gars - the program based on Montessori activities for working life, and the results reached: There was a significant impact of Montessori activities in developing self-image ( social competence - personal competence ) in children with autism spectrum disorder.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/dapt.2021.61461.1020

ISSN: 2535-2253

Article

Attività montessoriana nelle RR. Scuole italiane all'estero

Publication: Opera Montessori: bollettino bimestrale, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 39-43

Africa, Egypt, Europe, Maghreb, Malta, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North Africa, Southern Europe, Tunisia

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Language: Italian

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effectiveness of a Counseling Program Based on the Use of Montessori Method on Adaptive Environmental Behavior in a Sample of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: Journal of Environmental Science, vol. 49, no. 9

Pages: 181-216

Africa, Children with disabilities, Counseling, Egypt, Middle East, Montessori method of education, North Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The present study aims to identify the effectiveness of a counseling program based on the use of the Montessori method on the environmental adaptive behavior in a sample of children with mild intellectual disabilities, identifying also the differences in the level of behavioral adaptation in a sample of children on the adaptive behavior scale pre/post application of the program. The researchers define a sample of (40) items, applied to a sample consisting of (40) children with mild intellectual disabilities, aged between (10-12) years, selected from boys, divided equally to (20) experimental samples and (20) control samples, from Al-Ghafir Foundation for people with special needs. The researcher has used the (experimental) method and applied the scale of adaptive behavior. The research has come to several results, the most important of which is that there is a statistically significant correlation between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group, regarding the post application of the total adaptive behavior scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the experimental group, regarding the post/ follow up application of the adaptive behavioral scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group regarding the post-application of the total behavior scale, in favor of the experimental group. The research reached a set of recommendations, the most important of which are: the necessity of providing the necessary tools for developing skills for children with disabilities within government institutions, setting a special budget.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jes.2020.206380

ISSN: 1110-0826

Article

The Effect of Using Montessori Method on Developing Kindergartener's Speaking and Reading skills

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة التربية في القرن 21 للدراسات التربوية والنفسية [Journal of Education in the 21st Century for Educational and Psychological Studies], vol. 1, no. 10

Pages: 1-23 (Article 3)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Egypt, Language development, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North Africa, Reading - Academic achievement

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Abstract/Notes: play and have fun, the learning and teaching processes should be suited totheir nature. There is a number of known interesting learning activitieswhich are based on the arts, games and other oral activities. Thus Englishshould be taught as a means of communication and researchers should dotheir best to help EFL learners to develop their reading and speaking skills.Ur (2000: 12) declared that "out of all the four skills ,listening,speaking, reading and writing, speaking seems the most important, peoplewho speak a language are known as speakers of the language, as if speakingincluded all other kinds of knowing a target language" Today, many secondlanguage learners give the speaking skill priority in their learning because ifthey master this skill then they will be considered as if they have masteredall of the other skills.The importance of speaking is best shown with the integration of theother language skills. For instance, speaking can help students develop theirvocabulary and grammar and improve their writing skill. Ability to read isthe primary fundamental skill required for children to achieve academicsuccess. Currently, the expectation is that all children should begin readingearly and be able to read on grade level by third grade (U.S. Department ofEducation, 2002)Another way that speaking and reading are connected is throughdecoding .decoding is the process of pulling apart the sounds that each(1)letter makes, and then putting them back together to make a word.it is mucheasier for a child to sound out a word on the page that they have alreadyheard in conversation, than a completely new word. There less informationto process since the meaning and the pronunciation of the word are alreadyknown. A child who has heard more words spoken is at an advantage whenlearning to read, the skill of reading is special and often difficult to acquire.the fact that anyone learns how to read is something of a miracle. Learningto read is different from learning to speak; in the development of humanhistory, speaking precedes reading by thousands of yearsItalian educator and physician Maria Montessori developed aninnovative teaching methodology for children that left an indelible mark oneducation curricula throughout the world. Montessori education is a sensorybasedpedagogy that is based on the belief that children learn at their ownpace through manipulation of objects (Lopata, Wallace, & Finn,2005).According to Montessori, (Montessori, 1967, p.14). the goal ofeducation is “to be able to find activities that are so intrinsically meaningfulthat we want to throw ourselves into them” (Crain : 2004) confirmed thisassertion by noting that “when children find tasks that enable them todevelop their naturally emerging capacities, they become interested in themand concentrate deeply on them.In general, there is a need for more research regarding successfuleducational methods and pedagogy for this disenfranchised populationbecause the existing research does not adequately provide educationalplanners with the resources or information to develop effective programs(Williams:2001) examined the impact of the Montessori Method on(2)refugee children‟s social, cognitive and motor development using adifference-in-difference approach .The Montessori method of teachingaimed the fullest possible development of the whole child, ultimatelypreparing him for life‘s many rich experiences. Complemented by hertraining in medicine, psychology and anthropology, Dr .Maria Montessori(1870-1952) developed her philosophy of education based upon actualobservation of children.Students are assigned their own personal workstations designed witheducational items that correspond to the daily lesson plans and activities.Students are responsible for setting up the work area, choosing the learningactivity, applying the physical materials, and returning the materials back tothe shelves (Pickering: 2004).Children are always free to move around theroom and are not given deadlines for the various learning tasks. Desks arearranged into open networks that encourage meaningful group discourse, aswell as independent learning.Students work together with the teachers to organize time strategicallyin order to complete the necessary learning tasks of the day. The amount ofteachers in the classroom varies based on class size, but usually two teachersare used for sections with thirty or more students, In most settings, childrenare grouped in mixed ages and abilities based on three to six-year incrementssuch as 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-15 and 15-18 (other Montessori schools use onlythree year increment settings). Ages are mixed so that older students canassist and mentor the younger children in the group. Students are groupedaccording to common interests and experiences rather than the ability andskill level (Pickering: 2004).According to Montessori, from birth to age three the child learnsprimarily through the “unconscious absorbent mind.” During education in(3)the first three years, Montessori believed that it was necessary for theparents to develop in the role of unobtrusive educator; there to protect andguide without infringing on the child‟s right to self-discovery (Crain: 2004).This early developmental model enabled children to learn their own skillsat their own place. During the ages of three to six the child begins to utilizethe “conscious absorbent mind” which prompts students to participate increative problem-solving consisting of wooden and metal objects of varioussizes and shapes, personally designed by Montessori. If a problem becomestoo difficult or overwhelming for the student, the teacher delays the projectfor a future day. Children also engage in practical work consisting ofhousehold tasks and personal maintenance.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jsep.2020.84322

ISSN: 2682-1931

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