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472 results

Article

La enseñanza Montessori en la India - Escuela de Rajghat en Benares (fundada por la Sociedad Teosófica de la India, inaugurada por Rabindranath Tagore)

Available from: ARCA. Arxiu de Revistes Catalanes Antigues

Publication: Montessori: Revista Mensual Ilustrada, vol. 1, no. 3

Pages: 8-9

Asia, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Rabindranath Tagore - Biographic sources, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This article is preceded by a photograph of Rabindranath Tagore with a dedication note by Tagore referencing his meeting with Maria Montessori. The article is accompanied by photographs of children involved in Montessori activities.

Language: Spanish

Book

Maria Montessori Writes to Her Grandchildren: Letters from India, 1939-1946

Asia, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Correspondence, Maria Montessori - Writings, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In October 1939, while the “storm of war was gathering in Europe”, Maria and Mario Montessori set off to India to deliver a training course and lecture tour. When Italy became involved in the war, the British rule of India did not give the Montessoris permission to leave; they were to spend close to seven years in India, which would become a defining period in Montessori’s outlook on life and education.The letters Montessori wrote to her four teenage grandchildren in Holland give a completely new, private insight into that compellingly interesting period. We see a woman who is deeply connected to her family and friends. We also see her strong commitment to bringing progress and fighting illiteracy in India, which grew into an enduring love for the country and its people. Montessori’s colourful descriptions of her journey and life in India, her worries about her grandchildren in war-torn Europe, and her son’s imprisonment make a fascinating read.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-49-1 90-79506-49-4

Article

Music Breaks Down Barriers at Royal Indian Preschool [Jaipur, India]

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 25

Pages: 13

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Language: English

Article

Little Flower Grows Big in Indiana [Little Flower Montessori School, Mishawaka, Indiana]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 4, no. 6

Pages: 1, 3

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Language: English

Article

Montessori for All? Indian Experiments in ‘Child Education’, 1920s–1970s

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Comparative Education, vol. 57, no. 3

Pages: 1-19

Asia, Comparative education, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This article discusses the ‘Indianisation’, ‘nationalisation’, and ‘ruralisation’ of the Montessori method in India at the eve, and in the aftermath of the country’s political independence (1947). From 1914 onwards, Indian nationalists received Montessori’s ideas through publications, the networks of the new education movement, and the Theosophical Society. While innovative pre-schools for elite children worked closely with the ‘original’ method, the Nutan Bal Shikshan Sangh (‘New Child Education Society’, NBSS) adapted it to local conditions (‘Indianisation’). The NBSS aimed to universalise Montessori-based child education, as a contribution to nation-building (‘nationalisation’). With the establishment of the Gram Bal Shiksha Kendra (Rural Child Education Centre), in 1945, the NBSS brought the country’s most marginalised into the modernising reach of the new state, furthering Gandhi’s vision of ‘rural reconstruction’ (‘ruralisation’). From these experiments, the institutional model of the Anganwadi emerged, through which today millions of Indian children receive integrated child development services.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03050068.2021.1888408

ISSN: 0305-0068

Article

Using Mathematics Strategies in Early Childhood Education as a Basis for Culturally Responsive Teaching in India

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Early Years Education, vol. 14, no. 1

Pages: 15-34

Asia, Culturally relevant pedagogy, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The objective of this small study was to elicit responses from early childhood teachers in India on mathematics learning strategies and to measure the extent of finger counting technique adopted by the teachers in teaching young children. Specifically, the research focused on the effective ways of teaching mathematics to children in India, and examined teachers’ approach to number counting. In India, children were taught by their parents or by their teachers to use fingers to count. The qualitative study conducted by the researcher further enriched the topic with first‐hand comments by the teachers. Although the finger counting method was not the only process that teachers would adopt, it was embedded in the culture and taken into consideration while infusing mathematics skills. The teachers confirmed adopting the Indian method of finger counting in their teaching strategy; some specified that the method helped children to undertake addition and subtraction of carrying and borrowing, as counting by objects could not be available all the time. Although the study is limited by its small sample to the unique mathematics learning experience in India, it provides readers with a glimpse of culturally responsive teaching methods and an alternative mathematics teaching strategy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/09669760500446374

ISSN: 0966-9760

Article

Early Childhood Education in India: History, Trends, Issues, and Achievements

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 24, no. 1

Pages: 11-16

India, South

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Abstract/Notes: The changes in the social and economic structure of India have intensified the need for universal early childhood education. The formidable challenges before the Indian Government are: to provide high quality early childhood education programs; to preserve indigenous practices such as multilinguality, family/community involvement, participation of older children as caretakers of their younger siblings; and to provide early childhood education to all children despite serious financial constraints. This article presents a brief overview of the traditional childrearing practices in India, chronicles government initiatives in early childhood education, describes the range of programs available in India, and identifies goals that will shape the future of early childhood programs in India.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF02430544

ISSN: 1573-1707

Book Section

Maria Montessori en Inde: Adoption et Adaptation d’une Méthode Pédagogique [Maria Montessori in India: Adoption and Adaptation of a Pedagogic Method]

Available from: OpenEdition Books

Book Title: L’Inde et l’Italie: Rencontres intellectuelles, politiques et artistiques [India and Italy: Intellectual, political and artistic encounters]

Pages: 245-285

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In this article I focus on the impact of the Maria Montessori’s pedagogical method during the years of her work in South Asia (1939-1946; 1947-1949). The genesis of this research started in the late 1980s during the years of my fieldwork in Madras (today Chennai), when I was amazed to find a large number of “Montessori” schools in that city. Certainly, they were many more than in Italy, and in Rome itself, where Maria Montessori founded the first “House of Children” on the 6th January 1907. Thus, out of mere curiosity I started to enquire about the reasons of such “implantation”. Soon I came to know that Maria Montessori (1870-1952) and her son, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), from 1939 till 1949, spent almost ten years in India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In all those countries they collaborated and interacted with local pedagogists, by also training hundreds of children and more than thousand students and teachers to the homonimous “Montessori” pedagogical method. India, after Italy, was also the country where Maria Montessori spent the longest period of her life. After relating to the major events of her personal life as well as her scientific and social engagements as psychiatrist, pedagogist, outspoken feminist and antifascist, I deal here with the adoption and adaptation of her pedagogical method in South Asia. Finally, I tackle the influence of the local educational systems and cultural practices on Maria Montessori herself and on her own method’s further development. Due to such a synergic encouter and interaction, today India is one of the most dynamic and prestigeous international centers for the “Montessori” pedagogical method teachers’ training.,Dans cet article, j’étudie en particulier l’impact de la méthode pédagogique de Maria Montessori durant ses années en Asie du Sud (1939-1946, 1947-1949). La genèse de cette recherche a débuté à la fin des années 1980, quand j’ai été étonnée de trouver à Madras (Chennai) un si grand nombre d’écoles Montessori au cours de mon long terrain dans cette ville. Certes, elles étaient beaucoup plus nombreuses que celles présentes en Italie, et plus qu’à Rome même, où Maria Montessori fonda la première Maison des Enfants le 6 janvier 1907. Ainsi, par simple curiosité, je commençai à m’enquérir des raisons d’une telle « implantation ». Bientôt, j’ai réalisé que Maria Montessori (1870-1952) et son fils, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), avaient de 1939 à 1949, séjourné près de dix ans en Inde, au Pakistan et au Sri Lanka. Dans tous ces pays, ils ont collaboré et interagi avec les pédagogues locaux, en formant également des centaines d’enfants et plus de mille élèves et enseignants à la méthode pédagogique « Montessori ». L’Inde, après l’Italie, était aussi le pays où Maria Montessori a passé la plus longue période de sa vie. Après avoir évoqué les grands événements de sa vie personnelle ainsi que ses engagements scientifiques et sociaux en tant que psychiatre, pédagogue, féministe et antifasciste, je traite ici de l’adoption et de l’adaptation de sa méthode pédagogique en Asie du Sud. Enfin, j’analyse l’influence des systèmes éducatifs locaux et des pratiques culturelles sur Maria Montessori elle-même et sur le développement ultérieur de sa propre méthode. Grâce à cette rencontre et à cette interaction synergiques, l’Inde est aujourd’hui l’un des centres internationaux les plus dynamiques et les plus prestigieux pratiquant la méthode pédagogique Montessori.

Language: French

Published: Paris, France: OpenEdition Books, 2018

ISBN: 978-2-7132-3154-4

Series: Purushartha

Book

Learning from the Child: Excerpts from Inaugural and Valedictory Addresses of the 25th and 26th Indian Montessori Training Courses, Hyderabad, 1960-62

Albert Max Joosten - Speeches, addresses, etc., Albert Max Joosten - Writings, India, Indian Montessori Training Course (25th, Hyderabad, India, 1960-1961), Indian Montessori Training Course (26th, Hyderabad, India, 1961-1962), South Asia, Trainings

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Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Association Montessori Internationale, n.d.

Article

Excerpts from Inaugural and Valedictory Addresses of the 25th and 26th Indian Montessori Training Courses, Hyderabad, 1960-62

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 7

Pages: 58-64

Albert Max Joosten - Writings, Asia, Conferences, India, Indian Montessori Training Course (25th, Hyderabad, India, 1960-1961), Indian Montessori Training Course (26th, Hyderabad, India, 1961-1962), South Asia, Trainings

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

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