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231 results

Doctoral Dissertation

A Hermeneutic Exploration: Designing Grassroots Montessori Teacher Education Courses for Resource Limited Communities

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This study documents a Montessori teacher education program in three Nicaraguan villages. In each village, the researcher observed the implementation of a teacher education program designed by Montessori Phoenix Projects, and carried out research conversations with local participants. The data collection process spanned a period of one and one-half years. The resulting framework is designed to inform the implementation of grassroots teacher education courses serving resource-limited communities. The framework presents learning points essential for teacher education programs appropriate to childhood education within the Montessori tradition in resource-limited communities. These points include creating context, identifying breakdowns, generating possibility, and using a mimetic construct of time in curriculum development. Additionally, the results of this research offer insights for evaluation, arguments for the essential incorporation of tradition in socioeducational development, and methods in which collaboration with community members, NGOs, and educational authorities can move beyond the limitations of traditional forms of development. The works of Arendt, Gadamer, Geertz, Habermas, Herda, and Ricoeur inform the research and analysis. The research framework is comprised of the theoretical constructs of breakdowns (Arendt 1961), mimesis (Ricoeur 1984), and dissipation (Janstch 1980). Within this framework ontological resources are brought to light and serve as the progenesis to make new the old environment and bring imagined worlds of possibility to life. By converting breakdowns into new, recognizable forms through everyday language, options carrying hope for the future become visible. A critical aspect of these options involves understanding another's world. This study presents a unique model for making a difference in the lives of people who live in culturally diverse communities. Moreover, the model is not burdened by the traditional budget and personnel restraints associated with most development models. The framework presented in this dissertation may assist education reform consultants who work in developing countries and who are committed to give a voice to those people who commonly are not heard.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2002

Article

Special Feature–Montessori Indigenous Projects

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 12

Pages: 3

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori method of education, Oceania

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Language: English

Article

Montessori in an Indigenous Community [Wadja Wadja High School, Woorabinda, Central Queensland]

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 12

Pages: 8–10

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Oceania, Wadja Wadja High School (Woorabinda, Australia)

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Language: English

Article

Indigenous American Montessori Models: An American Montessori Elementary Teacher

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 16–18

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, North America, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Introduction of Montessori Education to a Remote Indigenous Early Childhood Program: A Study of the Ways in Which Aboriginal Students Respond

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 33-60

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori method of education, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores the ways Ngaanyatjarra students in Australia respond to Montessori pedagogy in a remote Aboriginal early childhood context. The article initially presents key literature pertaining to early childhood education, Aboriginal education, and Montessori education in Australia. The qualitative methodology underpinning the research is subsequently outlined. The approach emphasized in this research is that of interpretivism. The data analysis process highlighted three headings: concentration and engagement, student autonomy, and student independence. The findings of this research indicate the potential for Montessori pedagogy as a viable alternative practice of education for remote Aboriginal early childhood contexts, as Montessori pedagogy may align more harmoniously with the cultural dispositions of Ngaanyatjarra students. Finally, recommendations are presented in light of the research.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.6715

ISSN: 2378-3923

Book

An American Montessori Elementary Teacher: Indigenous American Montessori Models

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Nancy McCormick Rambusch - Writings, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's child-centered teaching method came to the United States in 1913 and became linked with an approach to progressive education and child rearing which many Americans considered permissive. During the post-World War II years, advocates of Montessori's method combined this permissive mode with elements of an authoritarian mode to produce an authoritative approach to teaching young children. Following this approach, educators at the Princeton Montessori School have developed and implemented a firm yet empathic teaching model for their classes. The social system which the teachers have developed in their classes respects children's intrinsic motivation in the form of a benign token economy, called a credit-debit system. In this system the rules of the classroom, and the rewards and sanctions attending the rules, are developed cooperatively between teacher and children. Teachers consider the small group as the basic unit of social organization for the presentation of lessons. Teachers present curricular subject areas in a sequence of steps which are numbered and which correspond to a set of materials preassembled by the teacher and directly accessible to the children. For each subject, students keep personal interactive journals which contain written and illustrated work for the whole year. Through these methods, teachers at the Princeton Montessori School demonstrate that they have understood the basic message of Montessori and imbedded that message in a culturally sensitive and appropriate form of schooling.

Language: English

Published: New Jersey: Princeton Center for Teacher Education, 1992

Article

Resilient Communities: An Ecological Perspective

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 81-88

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Abstract/Notes: Tom Wessel's view of interdependent local ecologies lays out a conceptual framework for human communities and corporations. His rich examples of biodiversity provide great metaphors for how competition and negative conditions can be transformed by natural cooperation and can lead to self-organized, self-managed natural communities that are sustained by emergent systems and can co-evolve. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Nature and Human Development," Seattle, WA, March 10-13, 2011.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Video Recording

Montessori and Indigenous People: We Share Our Dreams

Available from: YouTube

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous peoples, Montessori method of education, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: This video emphasizes how the values of indigenous Australian culture mesh with Montessori philosophy as represented by projects and principal advocates in Cairns West, Redfern (Sydney), and Wadja Wadja (Woorabinda). The desire for Montessori education by aboriginal peoples is documented through interviews on location.

Runtime: 16 minutes

Language: English

Published: Burton, Ohio, 2005

Video Recording

Preparation for Life: Montessori Infant-Toddler Communities

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Abstract/Notes: Preparation for Life: Infant-Toddler Communities takes you inside three renowned Montessori infant-toddler programs in St. Louis, Missouri, Chicago, Illinois and White Plains, New York to see how the Montessori approach nurtures the emotional, physical and intellectual growth of small children. Sensitive periods, the need for movement, order, language development, the prepared environment, separation and the role of the adult in the classroom are all covered. Filmed at Hope Montessori Infant Toddler Community, Monessori Children's Center at Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, and Seton Montessori Infant Toddler House.

Language: English

Published: Yellow Springs, Ohio, 2009

Article

A Cultural Tour [Schools of indigenous people west of Alice Springs]

Publication: Montessori Matters, no. 1

Pages: 22–24

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

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