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372 results

Article

Second-Language Acquisition in Irvine's Public Schools [Irvine, California]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 2, no. 4

Pages: 8

Bilingualism, Language acquisition, Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Preschool Second-Language Acquisition: A Parent Involvement Program to Reinforce Classroom Learning

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 23–24

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Task-based Language Learning in Bilingual Montessori Elementary Schools: Customizing Foreign Language Learning and Promoting L2 Speaking Skills

Available from: Universität Bern (Switzerland)

Publication: Linguistik Online, vol. 54, no. 4

Pages: 69-83

Bilingualism, Language acquisition

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Abstract/Notes: Foreign language learning has been a part of German elementary schools for several years now. Montessori schools focusing on individual learning, i.e. mostly independent from the teacher and based on auto-education, interest, and free choice, are also asked to teach an L2. The original lack of a concept of L2 learning for this environment has brought forth different approaches. Bilingual education seems to be feasible and applicable in Montessori education. The downside to this is that even in a bilingual classroom the Montessori way of learning may not allow for very much oral production of the foreign language. The role of L2 production (cf. Swain 1985, 1995, 2005) for language acquisition has been theoretically claimed and empirically investigated. Output can have a positive influence on L2 learning (cf. e.g. Izumi 2002, Keck et al. 2006). This also applies to interaction (cf. Long 1996), where negotiation of meaning and modified output are factors supporting L2 development (cf. e.g. de la Fuente 2002, McDonough 2005). Task-based Language Learning (TBLL) presents itself as one way to promote oral language production and to provide opportunities for meaning-negotiation. Especially tasks with required information exchange and a closed outcome have been shown to be beneficial for the elicitation of negotiation of meaning and modified output. This paper argues that TBLL is a promising approach for the facilitation of L2 production and thus the development of speaking skills in a Montessori context. It also hypothesizes that TBLL can be implemented in a bilingual Montessori environment while still making the Montessori way of learning possible. Different tasks on various topics, examples of which are presented in this article, can lay the foundation for this. Offering such tasks in a bilingual Montessori elementary classroom promises to foster language production and the use of communication strategies like negotiation of meaning, both being facilitative for L2 acquisition. This hypothesis remains to be tested in future research.

Language: German

DOI: 10.13092/lo.54.284

ISSN: 1615-3014

Article

Montessori Language Materials and Impact on Preschoolers' Language Development in Early Childhood Care and Development Centres (ECCDC) in Lagos State Nigeria

Available from: University of Lagos Library (Nigeria)

Publication: African Journal of Education and Behavioural Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 78-91

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Abstract/Notes: Languagge is one of the facilities that Preschoolers acquire in their early years and this is made possible by the interaction that they have with their environments - be it home, school where they grow and interact. To acquire language and develop vocabularies for communication, Montessori Language materials become invaluable tools for building and enhancing language versatility among preschoolers. Montessori materials like Large and Small Movable Alphabet boxes help in word building, while word lists help in vocabulary acquisition on a large scale. The study adopted descriptive survey and Quazi-experimental design. Four ECCDC were selected for the study; out of which two were used as experimental classes while the other two were used as control group. A total of 286 pupils from Lagos Education District 4 and 6 constituted the sample for the study. The treatment group was exposed to teaching and learning using the Montessori Language Materials (Large and Small Movable Alphabet boxes, word lists, phrases and sentence cards, etc.). The control group was also exposed to teaching and learning using the conventional instructional strategy. Instruments used for data collection were Public School Teachers' Questionnaire (PSTQ) and Pupils' Language Achievement Worksheets (PLAW). Data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics such as simple percentages, mean and standard deviation, whilst independent t-test and ANCOVA were used to test the hypotheses formulated. The study revealed that majority of the teachers in the study had no adequate preparation for the level of education where they teach; that the pupils that had practical sessions using Montessori Language Materials performed better in spelling, word building and reading activities and had larger number of vocabulary acquisition than their peers in the control group. The study also revealed that most of the teachers had no Montessori training and as such, they were unable to implement Montessori methods in their classrooms. Therefore, the recommendations include: that teachers should make the learning of language more practical by the use of diverse instructional materials that are age appropriate and allow pupils the opportunity to find out things for themselves. In addition, professional preparation of the early years' teachers should be extensive as to embrace and inculcate best practices in the course of their training so that they can be skillful and resourceful in dispensing their duties in the classrooms.

Language: English

ISSN: 2536-7382

Article

A Path for the Exploration of Any Language Leading to Writing and Reading: As Part of the Total Montessori Approach to the Development of Language

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 1-40

Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Influences of Balanced Language Approach Applied at Montessori Kindergarten on Children's Language Ability / 몬테소리 유치원에 적용한 균형적 언어 접근법이 유아의 언어능력에 미치는 효과

Available from: DBpia

Publication: 열린유아교육연구 / The Journal of Korea Open Association for Early Childhood Education, vol. 13, no. 4

Pages: 97-122

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined the influences of balanced language approach applied at Montessori kindergarten on children's language ability. This is a response to the need of diverse researches on Montessori language education and aims to provide basic materials to improve children's language ability. For the study, 60 children of five-year old participated for 8 weeks. The experimental group received Montessori language education with the balanced language approach program and the control group received general Montessori language education, The study found that the experimental group performing both Montessori language education and balanced language approach program showed significantly higher scores in language ability than the control group having Montessori language education. / 본 연구의 목적은 몬테소리 언어교육과 관련하여 다각적인 응용연구가 이루어져야 할 필요성에 따라 몬테소리 유치원에 적용한 균형적 언어 접근법이 유아의 언어능력에 어떠한 영향을 미치는지 알아봄으로써 유아의 언어능력을 향상시킬 수 있는 기초자료로 제공하고자 한다. 이를 위하여 유치원 만 5세 유아 60명을 대상으로 8주간의 실험처치로 실험집단에서는 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동과 균형적 언어 접근 프로그램을 병행하여 실시하고 비교집단에게는 일반적인 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동을 실시하였다. 연구결과, 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동과 균형적 언어 접근 프로그램을 병행한 실험집단이 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동만을 실시한 비교집단보다 언어능력의 점수에서 통계적으로 유의하게 높은 것으로 드러났다.

Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-8119, 2734-0074

Book Section

Language Games Children Play: Language Invention in a Montessori Primary School

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Handbook of the Changing World Language Map

Pages: 1-14

Child development, Imaginary languages, Language acquisition, Linguistics, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter illustrates the main results of a language laboratory held in a Montessori primary school in Milan, Italy, during 7 years. Pupils (age: 9–11) are guided in the collective invention of a secret language, using all their linguistic repertoire present in class – including minority and home languages. The structure of the language is highly influenced by the language of instruction (in our case, Italian), but, at the same time, it differs from that because its aim is to be secret. In other words, the invented language is shared among the class members only, who know how to decipher its alphabet and grammar, unlike other schoolmates. Secrecy permits the inventor to insert elements from other languages, resulting in an a priori language contact. During the process of invention, participants increase their metalinguistic awareness and thus their understanding of the languages they are studying formally – in our case, Italian and English. The Montessori method fosters a “learning-by-doing” approach and an active interdisciplinary cross-fertilization (called Cosmic Education). In fact, pupils may use the secret language to create an imaginary country – usually an island – and conceive a utopian society, putting together notions of natural sciences (for instance, orography) and social sciences, in particular, to describe the ideal human society speaking their secret language. The chapter also includes reflection on how this language laboratory can be applied in other educational contexts, maintaining its original character of being a serious game for learning.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2019

ISBN: 978-3-319-73400-2

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Administrating Language: The Language Ideological Voices of Urban School Administrators in Urban Education

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Urban Education, vol. 58, no. 10

Pages: 2462-2490

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Abstract/Notes: Urban schools are becoming increasingly linguistically diverse. However, principals are not adequately prepared to address linguistic variation, and in particular, issues related to African American Language (AAL). This study explores the language ideological voices of urban school administrators. Focus group sessions were conducted with 15 administrators of predominantly African American schools about the function of AAL in their students’ lives. Participants demonstrated variation in views toward AAL and struggled to name the language. These discussions were mediated by multiple, even competing, language ideologies, as they attempted to converse about the use of AAL in schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/0042085920959136

ISSN: 0042-0859

Article

Games: Language Games and Language Instructions

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 1-10

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

First Language Reading Skills Transfer to Second Language

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori], no. 22

Pages: 2

Bilingualism, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Language acquisition

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Language: English

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