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153 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Literacy Achievement in Nongraded Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This longitudinal quantitative study compared literacy achievement of students from second through sixth grade based on two organizational systems: graded (traditional) and nongraded (multiage) classrooms. The California Standards Test (CST) scaled and proficiency scores for English-Language Arts (ELA) were used as the study's independent variable to measure student performance. A matched control was utilized in which nongraded students were compared with graded students based on gender, ethnicity, and date of birth. Data analysis included independent samples t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and effect size. Results showed that nongraded students had a significant advantage over their graded counterparts in literacy achievement (p=0.000). Effect size for the matched group increased with length of exposure in the nongraded program from Cohen's d=0.49 to d=0.99. It is difficult to determine if significant outcomes were the result of classroom structure or instructional strategies used in the nongraded setting. However, a unique quality of this study involves the rare conditions and matched control design that allowed for variables to be controlled, which have yet to be simultaneously accounted for in multiage studies to date. Based on the results, this study suggested that nongraded education, by responding to the developmental nature of children in the classroom, may offer a viable alternative to the graded system. In nations such as Australia, New Zealand, Netherlands, Finland, and Canada with the highest literacy rates in the world, nongraded classrooms are common educational practice.

Language: English

Published: Los Angeles, California, 2011

Article

Let Peter Rabbit Play in the Garden: Using Beatrix Potter's Work to Integrate Ecological Literacy into Montessori Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 4

Pages: 38-43

Lower elementary, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Kelly Johnson introduces a series of lessons that incorporate literacy, observation, botany, history, place studies, writing, and art, with a long-term eco-literacy goal of connectedness and a conservation ethic. Johnson's initial idea to use Beatrix Potter as a model in the Lower Elementary classroom came after extensively researching Potter's life as part of her graduate studies. Johnson begins the series of lessons by presenting "The Tale of Peter Rabbit," asking the students if they remember the story. The stories are amazingly versatile, and, by analyzing the writing, the students begin to see the tales as far more than nursery stories--they are animal character glimpses, human nature vignettes, pieces of visual art, and works of literary art. Johnson concludes that when children are allowed free time in nature, as Beatrix Potter was during her childhood summers, they build unbreakable bonds that influence their adult lifestyle choices.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

The Influence of Montessori-Based Literacy Instruction and Methods on Reading Achievement of Students in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

Available from: Seton Hall University eRepository

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the influence of Montessori-based literacy curriculum and instruction on student achievement in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. I studied 71 matched pairs of urban charter school students (n=142) to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in reading achievement, as measured by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), between students who were instructed by their teachers in Montessori literacy methods and curriculum and students from a nearby charter school who were instructed by their teachers using a basal reading method. T-tests were used to compare the mean scores of the combined grade levels from each cohort on the 2011-2012 Maryland School Assessment (Reading section). The results of this study suggest that there was no significant difference in reading achievement between the two groups of students. There is very limited empirical research available examining reading achievement in Montessori public charter schools. Further research is recommended with similar groups of students from public Montessori school settings, or in this same setting with a different comparison group or a different evaluation tool.

Language: English

Published: South Orange, New Jersey, 2013

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Literacy in Kindergarten: Using the Montessori Method in Combination with the Daily 5 Method

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project was conducted to investigate the impact of merging the literacy program The Daily 5 with the Montessori Method of reading instruction. This project was intended to study the independent reading stamina of the students. It was conducted in a public Montessori School with kindergarten aged students from an early childhood classroom. There were 13 students participating, six girls and seven boys. Pre-assessment data was gathered in the forms of a parent survey and a baseline student reading assessment. Student stamina was recorded on a daily log and student reflections were recorded once a week. After the project was complete, the parents and students were surveyed for final reflection. The results show that when students are able to choose their own books, their stamina for reading improves. More research needs to be done to investigate the impact of the other four areas from the Daily 5 model in combination with Montessori Literacy.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2013

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Read Aloud with Socratic Discussion on the Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills of the Elementary Student

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study aims to uncover a link between read aloud with Socratic discussion and its impact on literacy and critical thinking skills. In researching this relationship, both quantitative and qualitative data tools were used. Participants in the study included 60 students from a charter Montessori school in the Southwest United States ranging from grade 1 to 6. Students participated in a six-week intervention. The intervention included a 60-minute read aloud with Socratic discussion session conducted twice a week. The findings indicate that there is a general increase in literacy and reading comprehension skills. In addition, the study was also shown to have a significant impact on individual participation and critical thinking skills as it relates to themes of the book. The conclusion of the study recommends more research with varied communities and book choices. In the future we must find ways to stimulate critical thinking skills in the elementary child using relatable themes and critical questioning.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Cultivating Toddler Emergent Literacy Behaviors Using the Montessori Sandpaper Letters

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Sandpaper Letters are a powerful, multi-sensory tool which can cultivate emergent literacy behaviors. A half-day Montessori classroom of 17 students between the ages of 2.4 years old and 3.5 years old in a private, accredited, suburban Montessori school participated in this action research study. Participants completed a four-week intervention that implemented daily use of the Sandpaper Letters. Data was collected through daily observations, tally charts, individual lesson logs, and a modified pre- and post-assessment of the ability to identify letter sounds. Thirteen out of 17 participants, or 76%, showed an increase in letter sound identification. In addition there was a significant increase in the number of child-initiated Sandpaper Letter lessons (as opposed to adult-initiated lessons). Also seen was an advancement of the children’s language skills from concrete to symbolic. This included the advent of writing, and the spontaneous appearance of activities demonstrating both phonological and phonemic awareness. These activities related directly to the Sandpaper Letters and demonstrated new and significant emergent literacy behaviors.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Putting the Discovery Back Into Montessori Language and Literacy

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 34

Pages: 11–12

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Songs on Social-Emotional Literacy in an Early Childhood Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Children in an early childhood Montessori classroom were taught songs that included words to label emotions and phrases for solving social conflicts. The purpose of this research was to find out if children’s emotional vocabulary and problem-solving strategies would be affected by learning words and phrases from songs about feelings and communication for six weeks. Data was collected through comparing words known to describe emotions on faces of an emotion chart, phrases known to communicate feelings, and records of children’s behaviors and conflict resolution strategies both pre and post-intervention. The results showed an increase in both the amount of words and variety of words known, and an increase in independently attempting to problem solve, while non-verbal reactions to problems. such as crying and hitting, decreased. Songs were found to be an effective tool to use to teach children in early childhood about emotional literacy. Because songs are shown to be an effective way to communicate important messages, teachers could consider using them to teach about other sensitive information, such as about privacy and strangers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Book Section

Creating an Environment That Enhances Emergent Literacy

Book Title: Building Literacy With Love: A Guide for Teachers and Caregivers of Children From Birth Through Age 5

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Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: Zero to Three Press, 2005

Article

Literacy and the Oral Foundation of Education

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 11-46

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Language acquisition, Literacy, Montessori method of education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Traces the richness of oral forms of expression used in nonliterate societies from ancient times to the present. Discusses the implications of research on orality for the early childhood curriculum and for methods of teaching young children. (BC)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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