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578 results

Article

Advantages of Mixed-age Free Play in Elementary School: Perceptions of Students, Teachers, and Parents

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Play, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 75-92

Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: Mixed-age groups have been shown to be effective in classroom settings, but only a handful of studies have explored mixed-age grouping in play. This research is a case study of one New York public elementary school that places great value on recess and mixed-age groupings. The school has implemented Let Grow Play Club before school one day per week for students in kindergarten through fifth grade. We use child interviews, teacher interviews, and parent surveys to examine the perceptions of mixed-age, outdoor play provided in Play Club and the school more generally. Across the different types of data, stakeholders expressed their support for cross-age interactions in mixed-age groupings. This play was perceived as valuable for helping build friendships and developing social skills, as older children become role models to younger ones. As suggested by Vygotsky’s (1978) theories, children are learning from one another and enhancing their development through unstructured play.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/21594937.2021.1878774

ISSN: 2159-4937

Doctoral Dissertation

An Examination of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Antibias-Antiracist Curriculm in a Montessori Setting

Available from: Lynn University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Abstract/Notes: The research consisted of a qualitative case study of three urban public Montessori schools with a population of 51% or more of students of color and a commitment of 2 years or more of CRP-ABAR within a Montessori setting. The theoretical framework used for the study was the critical race theory, which is the conceptual foundation for examining inequities in public education. This research dissertation had a focus on gaining an insight into the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents toward CRP-ABAR in Montessori schools by examining the practices in three public Montessori schools. The possible connections to student outcomes, such as behavioral referrals, suspension rates, and academic achievement for students of color were explored to determine if any connections exist between CRP-ABAR and outcomes for students of color within a public Montessori setting. Three major themes emerged of the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents about the impact of the CRP-ABAR in a Montessori setting. The CRP-ABAR could be delivered through a curriculum-oriented approach or a systemic-oriented approach and the CRP-ABAR connects to Montessori through peace-global education and the prepared teacher-environment. The CRP-ABAR practices impact students of color primarily through social emotional growth with limited academic outcomes. Even with an intentional focus and diversity training, many non-Black teachers’ perceptions of students of color included deficit theory thinking. Some parents believed racism is being dismantled through the curriculum and celebrations of diversity. Other parents identified some teachers-staff with underpinning instances of biases and insensitivity.

Language: English

Published: Boca Raton, Florida, 2020

Article

Awareness of Parents About Montessori Education: A Sample of Ankara and Seattle

Available from: DOAJ

Publication: Education Reform Journal, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 88-101

Americas, Middle East, Montessori method of education, North America, Parent education, Turkey, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study is to examine the Montessori awareness of parents living in Ankara and living in Seattle and whose children are attending Montessori preschool. The study group of the research was created by 61 parents whose children are attending Montessori Preschool in Turkey/Ankara and 21 parents whose children are attending Montessori Preschool in USA/Seattle. The research data were collected through “General Information Form” and “Parent Conception Form”. While General Information Form has demographic questions, Parent Conception Form has questions about Montessori education to gauge awareness of parents. Parent Conception Form is a three point Likert-type form. IBM SPSS STATISTICS V23.0 was used in the analysis of the data. Frequency and percentage values ​​are used in the analysis of the data. As a result of the research, it was determined that the parents living in Ankara and sending their children Montessori Preschool in Ankara have similar thoughts to parents living in Seattle and sending their children Montessori Preschool in Seattle. It has been determined that all parents that is included in the research have knowledge about the Montessori approach-based education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.22596/erj2018.0302.88.101

ISSN: 2602-3997

Doctoral Dissertation

Parents and Early Childhood Programs: A Historical Analysis

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Since early childhood programs were first introduced in the United States in the 1820s, early childhood professionals have been aware that teaching and caring for young children involves establishing relationships with their families. This study is a historical examination of the relationships between early childhood programs and parents. The study considered the political, social, and economic factors that have influenced the development of relationships between parents and early childhood programs, including: infant schools; kindergarten; laboratory schools; nursery schools; Montessori programs; day nurseries and child care; and Head Start. The study showed that the history of parent involvement in early childhood programs is essentially the history of early childhood programs. Since the 1820s, early childhood professionals have provided ample literary evidence of how parents were expected to be involved in early childhood programs, and how these expectations were communicated to them. Literary evidence was the basis for this study. Evidence used in the study included: autobiographies, journals, recollections, and letters of key participants; manuals of early childhood practice; proceedings from meetings and conferences; publications from government agencies; articles and commentaries from professional journals and popular magazines; theoretical and practical works by leaders in the field; research studies; textbooks; and childrearing advice books. The history of early childhood programs reveals a wide range of attempts to bring parents and early childhood programs together. At various times and in various contexts, these attempts have been called parent cooperation, parent education, parent participation, parent involvement, and teacher-parent partnership. Throughout most of the history of early childhood programs, parents were cast in the role of learner. More recently, the ideal relationship between parents and early childhood professionals has been characterized as that of a partnership. The various terms that have been used to describe the relationships between parents and early childhood programs were examined through the course of this study, as were the assumptions and beliefs that have influenced the interpretation of these terms.

Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts, 1999

Article

Parents' Q and A: Relationships with Grandparents

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 12, no. 2

Pages: 10–11

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Parents' Q and A: Childcare for Parents Returning to Work

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: 11

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Pour les parents [For the parents]

Available from: Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF) - Gallica

Publication: La Nouvelle éducation, no. 50

Pages: 187-189

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Language: French

ISSN: 2492-3524

Article

Parents, Teachers Confident Students Did Well

Available from: Digital Library of the Caribbean

Publication: Barbados Advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Pages: 9

Americas, Barbados, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean

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Abstract/Notes: Article text: The Springer Memorial Secondary School was a hive of activity and nervous excitement as students, stationery in hand, made their way into the school to sit the Barbados Secondary School Entrance Examination (BSSEE) on Tuesday. Nervous parents were left on the outside of the school grounds standing and awaiting the return of their child or ward upon completion of the two-part 11-Plus examination, consisting of English and Mathematics. Mitchelle Maxwell, Deputy Principal of the Springer Memorial Secondary School, told the media, “We have 252 students comprising Blackman and Gollop Primary, Charles F. Broome Memorial Primary, Belmont Primary, St. Giles Primary and a few students from various schools such as St. Angela’s Primary, Happy Vale Montessori Primary School, registered to take the Barbados Secondary School Examination. “Preparations were put in place from Friday ensuring the rooms were ready, and security checks were done this morning at 6:30 a.m. prior to the exam. “We expect to have a smooth operation as it pertains to the examination this morning, which is broken up into two – Essay and Grammar, and Mathematics.” Parent, Troy Johnson, was one of the many parents and guardians on the outside of the Springer Memorial school as he waited on daughter, Zaria Johnson. He told The Barbados Advocate, “I am more nervous than my daughter. During the course of the time it was okay, but this morning the flutters have it. “She has been going to lessons and doing extra work in between, so hopefully she will do well to pass for her first choice Springer Memorial.” Calvin Williams was amongst the parents standing outside the gate. He noted, “I was not worried by the threatened actions of the Barbados Union of Teachers affecting the 11-Plus children. I was more worried of after the 11-Plus and the correction of the papers and the possibility of late results, but other than that I was not worried about the 11-Plus. “In terms of my daughter, I am very confident she will do well. Whatever she does will be good for me. She has already made me proud in NAPSAC and I am grateful for whatever she does. At present she attends the St. Giles Primary and I must commend her teacher, Mr. Stoute, for his passionate attitude in teaching the students, my daughter included. The students in his class also have great respect for him and they tend to do well during the term. I have no doubt she and the other St. Giles students will do good.” After the first part of the exam was finished, students came out smiling as they related to parents and guardians their prowess in the English section of the exam. However, it was the Mathematics paper which reduced many to tears upon leaving the exam room, running into the arms of their parents, tears streaming down their faces. Lisa Wiles, a student of Charles F. Broome Memorial, told The Barbados Advocate, “2016 paper was harder than 2015 paper. The Composition and Grammar was easy, but Section Two and Three of the Mathematics paper was hard. I am relieved the exam is over and I hope I pass for my first choice of Queen’s College.” Teacher John Gittens of Charles F. Broome Memorial noted, “I am very confident my students did well. Some of them said Section Three of the Mathematics paper was challenging, but my children were well prepared. Children at Charles F. Broome are generally well prepared. It is concerning a lot are in tears about the Mathematics paper, but generally we will do well. I do not like to see them crying because I like them to be able to conquer challenges. The fact there are tears means there are sums or one particular sum that was challenging, but I always tell them there are things you may not be comfortable with, but just apply yourself to it because that is just fear. “Now the exam is finished, some of the students will be taken to Divi Southwinds for a treat arranged by their parents where they can relax and have fun. The next day at school, we will review the exam papers with them and show them where they went wrong so they can apply it later on.”

Language: English

Article

Memo to Parents: Do's and Don'ts for Montessori Parents in the Home

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 5, no. 5

Pages: 11

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Language: English

Book

Evaluation of the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option (K-6) Pupil Progress Report

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Abstract/Notes: Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. Questionnaires were sent to the households of 536 pupils and to 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools. Parents and guardians replied positively to 25 closed-ended questions; were neutral about none; and responded negatively to four. School staff replied positively to 27; were neutral about none; and responded negatively to two. Parents and guardians expressed concern about more than 46 survey-related topics. Parent-initiated topics included: competitiveness and comparison between students, curriculum design and development, learning environments, parent-teacher conferences, program expansion, public school use of Montessori philosophy, and staff certification and training. School staff expressed concern about classroom mangagement, instructional materials, parent involvement, parent-teacher conferences, skills and knowledge analysis, student progress, and the district-wide testing program. Questions and responses (along a Likert-type scale) are provided for parents and school staff members. Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. The survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and three open-ended questions. The five sections of the survey covered the evaluation key, report card headings and philosophy, report card delivery to parents and guardians, and basic principles of the Montessori method. The survey elicited parent opinions about the program. The households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires. This main report describes survey methodology, reports results and conclusions, and offers recommendations. Related materials are appended. Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. The survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and 3 open-ended questions. The five sections of the survey introduced the topics of the evaluation key, report card headings and philosophy, report card delivery to parents and guardians, and basic principles of the Montessori method. The survey elicited parent opinions about the program. The households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires. This appendix to the main report provides: (1) survey design input from parents, teachers, and others; (2) the Montessori Option Pupil Progress Report Survey; and (3) parent and teacher responses for each item.

Language: English

Published: Indianapolis, Indiana: Indianapolis Public Schools, 1989

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