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40 results

Reading Achievement and Perceptions Regarding the Multi-age Classroom Environment

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Language: English

Published: Vermillion, South Dakota, 2008

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Square Pegs in Round Holes: Montessori Principals' Perceptions of Science Education in Texas Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the perceptions of Texas public Montessori school principals as instructional leaders in science. Twelve public Montessori school principals were interviewed for this study. Two research questions were used: How do public Montessori principals perceive Texas science standards in public Montessori Elementary classrooms? How do principals view their role as an instructional leader in elementary science related to teachers' effectiveness and student outcomes? Research question one resulted in the following themes: (a) aligning curricula to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), (b) engaging science instruction as integrated and hands-on lessons, (c) emphasizing required district and state assessments, and (d) incorporating traditional teaching methodologies to support Montessori instruction. Research question two yielded common themes: (a) balancing Montessori methodologies and philosophies in public school settings with competing demands, (b) monitoring assessment scores as the determination of student success, (c) working in collaboration to support teacher effectiveness, and (d) providing resources and support to teachers. Implications for Montessori practitioners: paradox of Montessori education in a public school setting, strong support for science in classrooms from the principal and a need for continued research around Montessori education in public school settings.

Language: English

Published: Beaumont, Texas, 2013

Doctoral Dissertation

Examining Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of the Impact of High-Stakes Testing on Classroom Teaching Practices: A Mixed Methods Study

Available from: UAB Libraries

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Abstract/Notes: The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) requires schools to be held accountable for academic performance. It is believed the pressure of accountability will lead teachers to narrow the curriculum by engaging students in test preparation activities. The purpose of this two-phase, explanatory mixed methods study was to examine elementary teachers’ perceptions of the impact of the Stanford Achievement Test 10 (SAT-10) and the Alabama Reading and Math Test (ARMT) on classroom teaching practices from a sample of third-grade, fourth-grade, and fifth-grade teachers in three large school systems in Alabama. The purpose of the first, quantitative phase of the study, was to reveal teachers’ perceptions of the impact of high-stakes testing on curriculum and instructional approaches, the amount of time spent on critical thinking skills, the amount of time spent on test preparation activities, and the perceived impact of state tests on students and teachers by surveying 123 third-grade through fifth-grade teachers in three large Alabama school systems. In the second, qualitative phase of this study, purposeful sampling strategy and maximal variation sampling strategy were employed to interview nine teachers who responded to the survey in the first, quantitative phase of the study to explore the results from the statistical tests in more depth. Findings suggested urban teachers spent more time on critical-thinking skills than rural and suburban teachers, and low-socioeconomic, rural teachers experienced more stress caused by high-stakes testing than their geographical counterparts. All teachers independent of socioeconomic status or school geographical location reported they increased their focus on reading and math, which were the subjects assessed on high-stakes tests and de-emphasized subjects not tested such as social studies and science. Finally, most teachers reported they decreased the teaching of critical thinking skills due to the SAT-10 but increased the teaching of critical thinking skills due to the ARMT. Due to the lack of research regarding high-stakes testing in Alabama elementary schools, there was a need for teachers to discuss the specific impact of testing on classroom teaching practices because they work directly with students and are cognizant of the challenges that teachers face.

Language: English

Published: Birmingham, Alabama, 2010

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Classroom Talk Lessons on Student Perceptions of Collaborative Group Work in a Remote, Synchronous Montessori Elementary Learning Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, COVID-19 Pandemic, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Online learning

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed-methods action research examined the effects of classroom talk lessons on children’s perceptions of collaborative group work in an online Montessori learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 19 Lower Elementary students and one teacher/investigator. All work was online, both synchronous and asynchronous. Students were presented with lessons in classroom talk, and practiced these skills during online collaboration in the creation of a student newsletter. Key findings were that students use of classroom talk behaviors and rigorous thinking increased slightly over the four-week period and students’ perceptions of their community identity and the value of their ideas increased over the course of the intervention, most notably in younger students. Teaching classroom talk had positive effects on student agency, depth of collaborative work, and grace and courtesy in this digital Montessori classroom. Respectful disagreement was identified as an area for future study.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Article

Montessori and Her Views on Education Through Sense-Perceptions

Publication: Calcutta Review, vol. 83, no. 3

Pages: 253-264

Asia, India, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., South Asia

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Language: English

ISSN: 0045-3846

Article

Learning Made Easy: Maria Montessori's Method Awakens the Child's Perceptions

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Montessori Information Items, no. 1

Pages: 1-3

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Abstract/Notes: Published by Cleveland Montessori Association (Cleveland, Ohio). Reprinted from Jubilee (September 1953), p. 46-53.

Language: English

Article

Student Perceptions of Their Elementary Classrooms: Montessori vs. Traditional Environments

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: 45–48

Perceptions

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Learning Made Easy: Maria Montessori's Method Awakens the Child's Perceptions

Publication: Jubilee, vol. 1

Pages: 46-53

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Language: English

ISSN: 0449-3486

Article

Parents' Perceptions: The Transition of Public School Montessori Students into Traditional Middle Schools

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: 87–97

Montessori schools, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Parent attitudes, Perceptions, Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Conference Paper

Effects of Multigrade Classes on Student Progress in Literacy and Numeracy: Quantitative Evidence and Perceptions of Teachers and School Leaders

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the Australian Association for Research in Education (Adelaide, Australia, November 29-December 3, 1998).

Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: On the basis of a comprehensive best-evidence synthesis of the literature on the effects of multigrade and multi-age classes, Veenman (1995) concluded that there were no significant differences between multigrade and single-grade classes in cognitive or achievement effects. Subsequently, Mason and Burns (1996) challenged Veenman's conclusion, claiming that multigrade classes have at least a small negative effect on achievement, as well as having potential negative effects on teacher motivation. Multigrade classes are used extensively within Victorian primary schools, sometimes by choice but at other times as a result of the combined pressures from staff-student ratios and enrollment numbers at particular grade levels. The issue of their contribution to effective learning is thus a critical, practical one, as well as an interesting research question. Analysis of data from the Victorian Quality Schools Project, a large, comprehensive, three-year, longitudinal study of school and

Language: English

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