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37 results

Article

La méthode Montessori aux Refuges de Saint-Sulpice et de Fontenay-aux-Roses; une curieuse expérience d'enseignement sur les petits réfugiés [The Montessori method at the Refuges of Saint-Sulpice and Fontenay-aux-Roses; a curious teaching experience on small refugees]

Available from: Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF) - Gallica

Publication: Journal des Réfugiés du Nord (Paris, France)

Pages: 1-2

Displaced communities, Europe, France, Refugees, Western Europe

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Language: French

Book Section

The White Cross: Rehabilitating War-Stricken Children to Prevent War

Book Title: The Best Weapon for Peace: Maria Montessori, Education, and Children's Rights

Pages: 70-99

Croce Bianca, Displaced communities, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Refugees, White Cross

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Language: English

Published: Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 2021

Edition: 1st edition

ISBN: 978-0-299-33310-2

Series: George L. Mosse Series in the History of European Culture, Sexuality, and Ideas

Article

Improving Outcomes for Refugee Children: A Case Study on the Impact of Montessori Education Along the Thai-Burma Border

Available from: IEJ Online

Publication: International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives, vol. 14, no. 3

Pages: 138-149

Asia, Burma, Displaced communities, Myanmar, Refugees, Southeast Asia, Thailand, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: There are 25 million displaced children worldwide, and those receiving schooling are often educated in overcrowded classrooms. Montessori is a child-centred educational method that provides an alternative model to traditional educational approaches. In this model, students are able to direct their own learning and develop at their own pace, working with materials rather than in supervised groups or with direct teacher instruction. Because most children are working alone, teachers have more time to work one-on- one with children even when student-teacher ratios are quite large. This gives teachers increased opportunity to tailor their teaching to the specific needs and strengths of each student. We conducted an evaluation of Montessori classroom conversion for displaced students on the Thai-Myanmar border. We administered the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) to 66 children before and after classroom conversion and across treatment and control classroom conditions. We then conducted difference in difference testing. All domains showed meaningful improvements in ASQ scores, with the Montessori students gaining 18 points relative to the traditional students (p = 0.33). However, only the personal-social domain of the ASQ was statistically significant (8.8 point gain for the Montessori students relative to the control, p < 0.05) in our underpowered sample.

Language: English

ISSN: 1443-1475, 2202-493X

Article

The Tibetan Children's Villages

Available from: SILO

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

Pages: 1-8

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

A Montessori Multicultural Environment with Southeast Asian Refugee Children

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 12, no. 2

Pages: 13-23

Americas, Asia, Cultural pluralism, Displaced communities, North America, Refugees, Southeast Asia, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Songs on Hmong Vocabulary Acquisition

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Bilingualism, Displaced communities, Hmong (Asian people), Hmong American children, Hmong American families, Hmong songs, Immigrants, Language acquisition, North America, Refugees

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Abstract/Notes: This action research assessed the effects of singing a song to learn language in a bilingual classroom. The research took place at a bilingual Hmong-English Montessori preschool program. 28 preschool-aged children participated in the research which was conducted over five weeks. Data sources included a parent questionnaire, vocabulary pre-test, vocabulary post-test with a follow-up conversation, daily observation logs, and tally sheet. The children were taught 16 Hmong vocabulary words with half the words sung to the tune of a common children’s song and the other half by simple reciting. The results from the vocabulary post-test showed that there was an increase in the children’s ability to recall Hmong vocabulary taught through the song and the follow-up conversation showed that the children enjoyed learning by singing. Further research could examine the continued use of singing vocabulary to common children’s songs and its effects on language learning in the long-term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation

Tibetanization Project: Teachers' Meanings and Perspectives

Available from: University of Virginia

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates meanings and perspectives of Tibetan elementary school teachers with regard to Tibetan medium education termed as the Tibetanization Project. It is a qualitative study in which assertions were generated based on common themes that emerged from the participating teachers' shared perspectives. The research questions that guided this study were: (a) What does Tibetanization mean to teachers in Tibetan Children's Village (TCV) schools in India? (b) How has the Tibetanization Project changed the instructional methods of teachers? (c) Has the Tibetanization Project made education more relevant for the Tibetan children? If so, how? If not, why not? (d) How do teachers perceive the Tibetan language and cultural acquisition among the children under the Tibetanization Project? and (e) How does Tibetan medium education affect the Tibetan people in exile? As a result of the research carried out: (1) The Tibetan teachers believe that although teaching of English as a subject is important, instruction solely in a foreign language at the primary school level can deter complete understanding of important concepts, and hinder acquisition of both languages, native and foreign. (2) In order to preserve the Tibetan language and give a quality education to Tibetan children, it is imperative to use the mother tongue as the medium of instruction at the primary school level. (3) The Tibetanization Project has encouraged active participation, critical thinking, and problem solving skills among Tibetan refugee students. (4) The Tibetanization Project has enriched Tibetan vocabulary both Tibetan teachers and students of elementary schools. (5) In spite of the above mentioned benefits, teachers still doubt the practicality of the Tibetanization Project in exile. (6) Teachers believe that a Tibetan medium education would be more practical if Tibet was a free country, but because that Tibetans live in exile, education in English medium is more vital for a successful life.

Language: English

Published: Charlottesville, Virginia, 2001

Article

Il Metodo Montessori Francia Durante la Guerra

Publication: La Coltura Popolare: Organo dell'Unione Italiana dell'Educazione Popolare, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 46-53

Croce Bianca, Displaced communities, Europe, France, Montessori method of education, Refugees, Western Europe, White Cross

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0011-2801

Blog Post

Helping and Empowering Refugee Women To Become Montessori Teachers

Displaced communities, Jordan, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Refugees, Syria, Turkey, Western Asia

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Language: English

Published: Sep 20, 2017

Article

Tibetanska Flyktingbarn i Norra Indien Går i Montessoriskola [Tibetan Refugee Children in Northern India Attend Montessori School]

Publication: Montessori-tidningen (Svenska montessoriförbundet), no. 6

Pages: 12-13

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet

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Language: Swedish

ISSN: 1103-8101

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