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Report

An Evaluation of Montessori Education in South Carolina's Public Schools

Available from: The Riley Institute at Furman University

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Abstract/Notes: With support from the Self Family Foundation and the South Carolina Education Oversight Committee, the Riley Institute has completed a multi-year study of Montessori education in South Carolina’s public schools, the most comprehensive evaluation of public Montessori ever conducted in the United States. Between 2011 and 2016, this mixed-method study examined how Montessori impacts stakeholders in South Carolina and provided information needed to guide future investment in Montessori education. Researchers investigated the following as parts of the study: the extent to which schools implemented Montessori with fidelity; the demographic makeup of public school Montessori students; the effect of Montessori education on academic and behavioral outcomes; the impact of Montessori education on creativity, social skills, work habits, and executive function; and Montessori teachers’ perspectives on job satisfaction and the challenges of Montessori in the public sector. The study results demonstrate that students in public school Montessori classrooms across the state are faring well, as compared to similar nonMontessori public school students, when examining academic, behavioral, and affective outcomes.

Language: English

Published: Greenville, South Carolina, 2018

Article

Montessori in South Carolina: Authentic or Not?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 30, no. 4

Pages: 48-53

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Abstract/Notes: While our study focused only on South Carolina, it is safe to assume that at least some of these issues, and probably others, exist in other states as well. Because we are focusing on challenges and barriers, it may give the impression that the overall study findings were negative. Exacerbating this problem is that very few Montessori teachers in South Carolina express interest in moving into administrative positions, reducing the pool of potential administrators qualified to run a Montessori program. [...]few hired principals that come into Montessori schools have Montessori credentials or experience in Montessori classrooms or schools. Offer more professional development and training certificates. * Provide funds for Montessori administrators to enter a training program offering a Montessori Administrative credential. * Offer a user-friendly and low-cost online course on the basics of Montessori. 2. Provide more opportunities for networking/mentoring. * Form online groups for Montessori public school principals. * Assign experienced Montessori principals to mentor new Montessori principals. * Conduct periodic, regional meetings of Montessori administrators for networking and idea sharing. 2 THE EMPHASIS ON STATE STANDARDS VERSUS FOLLOWING THE MONTESSORI CURRICULUM While most South Carolina public Montessori teachers agreed that they were able to implement authentic Montessori while incorporating state standards, and over three-quarters of teachers reported using the Montessori curriculum/sequence training as their foremost teaching guide, nearly half of all teachers reported that their schools required them to use a pacing guide for following standards and benchmark testing.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Association of Australasia

Publication: Montessori Today (London), vol. 1, no. 4

Pages: 27

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori Association of Australasia, New Zealand, Oceania

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Language: English

Article

Montessori in South Africa

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 31–32

Africa, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori in Soweto: A South African School That Soars - The National Movement That Inspired it

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 22-25

Africa, Public Montessori, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Language: English

Article

Alone Among Early Childhood Educators: Anastasia Kostin on the Limited Presence of Montessorians at a State AEYC Conference

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: 13

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Book Section

Love: An Essential Need

Book Title: Creative Development in the Child: The Montessori Approach

Pages: 224-228

Asia, Child development, India, South Asia, Maria Montessori - Writings, South Asia, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori lectured in Italian during the first International Montessori Course in 1939 at Madras, India. These 75 lectures were translated into English by her son Mario, as she spoke. And were taken down near verbatim in short hand, transcribed and set into galleys overnight. One such set of proofs forms the original manuscript for this book. For the most part, each chapter in this book encompasses a single lecture. The lectures are left in the same order as they were given, swinging between psychology and the use of the materials. India’s diversity of language, social custom and religious practice enriched her research. During this time, Dr. Montessori worked with children in Madras and put into practice her theories of adapting the environment, furniture and the Practical Life materials to local conditions. In these lectures, Maria Montessori speaks with the mature wisdom of a lifetime spent studying, not just early childhood, but human development as a whole and gives a complete, wonderful and colorful overview of her pedagogy and philosophy.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-52-1

Series: The Montessori Series , 24

Book Section

Maria Montessori en Inde: Adoption et Adaptation d’une Méthode Pédagogique [Maria Montessori in India: Adoption and Adaptation of a Pedagogic Method]

Available from: OpenEdition Books

Book Title: L’Inde et l’Italie: Rencontres intellectuelles, politiques et artistiques [India and Italy: Intellectual, political and artistic encounters]

Pages: 245-285

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In this article I focus on the impact of the Maria Montessori’s pedagogical method during the years of her work in South Asia (1939-1946; 1947-1949). The genesis of this research started in the late 1980s during the years of my fieldwork in Madras (today Chennai), when I was amazed to find a large number of “Montessori” schools in that city. Certainly, they were many more than in Italy, and in Rome itself, where Maria Montessori founded the first “House of Children” on the 6th January 1907. Thus, out of mere curiosity I started to enquire about the reasons of such “implantation”. Soon I came to know that Maria Montessori (1870-1952) and her son, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), from 1939 till 1949, spent almost ten years in India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In all those countries they collaborated and interacted with local pedagogists, by also training hundreds of children and more than thousand students and teachers to the homonimous “Montessori” pedagogical method. India, after Italy, was also the country where Maria Montessori spent the longest period of her life. After relating to the major events of her personal life as well as her scientific and social engagements as psychiatrist, pedagogist, outspoken feminist and antifascist, I deal here with the adoption and adaptation of her pedagogical method in South Asia. Finally, I tackle the influence of the local educational systems and cultural practices on Maria Montessori herself and on her own method’s further development. Due to such a synergic encouter and interaction, today India is one of the most dynamic and prestigeous international centers for the “Montessori” pedagogical method teachers’ training.,Dans cet article, j’étudie en particulier l’impact de la méthode pédagogique de Maria Montessori durant ses années en Asie du Sud (1939-1946, 1947-1949). La genèse de cette recherche a débuté à la fin des années 1980, quand j’ai été étonnée de trouver à Madras (Chennai) un si grand nombre d’écoles Montessori au cours de mon long terrain dans cette ville. Certes, elles étaient beaucoup plus nombreuses que celles présentes en Italie, et plus qu’à Rome même, où Maria Montessori fonda la première Maison des Enfants le 6 janvier 1907. Ainsi, par simple curiosité, je commençai à m’enquérir des raisons d’une telle « implantation ». Bientôt, j’ai réalisé que Maria Montessori (1870-1952) et son fils, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), avaient de 1939 à 1949, séjourné près de dix ans en Inde, au Pakistan et au Sri Lanka. Dans tous ces pays, ils ont collaboré et interagi avec les pédagogues locaux, en formant également des centaines d’enfants et plus de mille élèves et enseignants à la méthode pédagogique « Montessori ». L’Inde, après l’Italie, était aussi le pays où Maria Montessori a passé la plus longue période de sa vie. Après avoir évoqué les grands événements de sa vie personnelle ainsi que ses engagements scientifiques et sociaux en tant que psychiatre, pédagogue, féministe et antifasciste, je traite ici de l’adoption et de l’adaptation de sa méthode pédagogique en Asie du Sud. Enfin, j’analyse l’influence des systèmes éducatifs locaux et des pratiques culturelles sur Maria Montessori elle-même et sur le développement ultérieur de sa propre méthode. Grâce à cette rencontre et à cette interaction synergiques, l’Inde est aujourd’hui l’un des centres internationaux les plus dynamiques et les plus prestigieux pratiquant la méthode pédagogique Montessori.

Language: French

Published: Paris, France: OpenEdition Books, 2018

ISBN: 978-2-7132-3154-4

Series: Purushartha

Article

Performing Gender, Class and Nation: Rukmini Devi Arundale and the Impact of Kalakshetra

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: South Asia Research, vol. 39, no. 3_suppl

Pages: 61S-79S

Asia, India, Kalakshetra (Institute: Chennai, India), Rukmini Devi Arundale - Biographic sources, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Rukmini Devi Arundale, herself a choreographer and dancer, is considered one of the key figures in re-creating Bharatanatyam. Through her utopian arts colony, Kalakshetra, started during the movement towards Indian independence, she taught what she deemed to be a classical, religious and aesthetically pleasing form of dance. Her rejection of what she termed vulgarity and commercialism in dance reflects her Theosophical worldviews and her class position in a rapidly changing South India. The article examines the ways in which her understanding of Bharatanatyam developed in the context of contested forms of nationalism as a gender regime that contributed to creating proper middle-class, Hindu and Indian subjects. It also examines the impacts of this form of cultural heritage relating to gender, culture and nationalism in today’s globalised South Asian dance scenario.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/0262728019872612

ISSN: 0262-7280

Article

Does a Montessori Model Work in Public Schools? Ask South Carolina

Available from: Education Week

Publication: Education Week

Americas, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: South Carolina's push to bring the century-old Montessori model to public classrooms may be paying off in both student performance and creativity, according to a new longitudinal evaluation.

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-4232

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