Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

474 results

Article

News from the Regions [Mexico, United States, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Brazil]

Publication: El Boletin [Consejo Interamericano Montessori]

Pages: 4-8

Americas, Latin America and the Caribbean

See More

Language: English

Article

News from the Regions [Mexico, South America, Central America, United States]

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori]

Pages: 1-4

Americas, Central America, Comité Hispano Montessori - History, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latin American community, Latino community, Mexico, North America, South America, United States of America

See More

Language: English

Article

News from the Regions [South America, Central America, Mexico, United States]

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori]

Pages: 1-2

Americas, Central America, Comité Hispano Montessori - History, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latin American community, Latino community, Mexico, North America, South America, United States of America

See More

Language: English

Article

News from the Regions [Mexico, United States, Caribbean, South America, Brazil]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 14, no. 4

Pages: 20-21

Americas, Latin America and the Caribbean, Public Montessori

See More

Abstract/Notes: El Boletin, May 2002

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Maria Montessori va in America. Una Rilettura Pedagogica di un Episodio di Incontro-Scontro tra Attivismo Pedagogico Italiano e Progressive Education Americana / Maria Montessori goes to America: A Pedagogical Reflection of an Encounter-Clash Between Italian Activism Movement and American Progressive Education

Available from: Formazione, Lavoro, Persona

Publication: Formazione, Lavoro, Persona, vol. 10 (Anno 4)

Pages: 1-10

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, North America, Progressive education, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: The complex history of Montessori’s Method spreading in the United States was signed by some misunderstandings connected with the reform of the american education system. The Method wasn’t understood in its specificity, but it appeared, in the same time, an alternative or an application of the tradition of Froebel’s Kindergarten. In those years the American pedagogical reflection tried to create an alternative to the continental tradition. For this reason the Progressive Education critized Montessori (i.e. Kilpatrick) for her spiritual and metaphysical premises but this movement couldn’t realize this project and it was inevitably connected with the tradition of European Activism.

Language: Italian

ISSN: 2039-4039

Book

What American Montessori Can Offer American Education and How Montessori Theory Fares in the Light of American Research

See More

Language: English

Published: [Illinois]: Illinois Montessori Society, 1963

Article

Montessori's System Strongly Defended; United States Commissioner of Education Reports on Plan

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: San Francisco Examiner (San Francisco, California)

Pages: 22

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

See More

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Comparison of the Application of Maria Montessori's Language Arts Ideas and Practices in Two Periods of Development in the United States: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Language acquisition, Language development, Language education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's work is intimately grounded in her detailed teaching practices and the logic of their sequence, along with their underlying ideas and values, particularly in the area of language arts. There are no studies, however, which comprehensively analyze her language arts curriculum for children from three to seven as it was applied by the practitioners who fostered, interpreted, and promoted her work in America in two periods of its popularity: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963. This lack of comprehensive analysis blurs the fundamental identity and contextual coherence of Montessori's work and obscures the significant and ongoing contribution made to American education through her language arts curriculum. An analysis of Montessori's published work and those written about her was made in order to achieve a description of her language arts curriculum for the purpose of comparing her work to that of her American sponsors. To determine how Montessori's curriculum was interpreted and applied, the literature on the history of the Montessori movement was reviewed and five leaders were identified: Ann George, Alexander Graham Bell, Clara Craig, Helen Parkhurst, and Nancy McCormick Rambusch. Their writings and other primary sources were analyzed with reference to Montessori's curriculum. In some cases interviews were conducted and Montessori classrooms were observed over an extended period of time. The analysis of the activity of the leaders, within their contemporary social and educational settings revealed how Montessori's curriculum became detached from her original experimental context and was reshaped because of lack of understanding or of agreement with the sys~ tematic purpose of her educational material in the development of language arts skills, and because of varying intentions and views on how and what children should learn. The findings of the study also contribute to existing studies on the reasons for the decline of Montessori's practices by the end of the first period, and for success in the revival of her work in the second period. In addition, conclusions contribute to the unified body of knowledge needed to thoroughly identify the Montessori educational model practiced and researched by educators.

Language: English

Published: Durham, North Carolina, 1984

Master's Thesis

Circle Time Norms in Early Childhood Montessori Programs: A Survey of Montessori Teachers Across the United States

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Teachers, North America, Rituals, Teachers, Three-hour work cycle, United States of America, Work periods

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study examined the nature of circle time within early childhood Montessori classrooms in the United States of America. We explored literature pertaining to the history and development of circle time as well as circle time research in preschool and kindergarten settings. Unable to find writings or research specific to Montessori circle time practices, we crafted a 30-question survey for early childhood Montessori teachers to determine basic information about their circle time approaches. The survey asked participants about demographic information, circle time logistics, circle time activities, reactions to circle time, planning and preparation, and the morning work cycle. Using social media and direct emails, we gathered over 300 responses from 50 states and the District of Columbia; a total of 276 participants completed the full survey. Results focused on five different areas: time - the frequency, duration, and scheduling of circle time; attendance - who joined circle time and for how long; teacher preparation - participants’ training and planning approaches; circle time programming - the most common and popular activities; the morning work cycle – its relation to circle time. Results revealed that 92% of survey participants have circle time every day or most days; most participants hold circle time as the last event of the morning for generally 20 minutes or less; the most common circle time events were show and tell, calendar work, vocabulary lessons, Grace and Courtesy lessons, read aloud discussions, dancing and movement, snack time, general conversation, read aloud (stories), and birthday celebrations. Most participants had a work cycle that lasts less than three hours. This study promotes reflection on the importance and meaning of circle time in Montessori classrooms in relation to its apparent absence in Dr. Montessori’s writings.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2021

Doctoral Dissertation

Assessment Practices Used by Montessori Teachers of Kindergarten Through Sixth Grade Students in the United States

Available from: American Montessori Society

Americas, Assessment, Montessori method of education - Teachers, North America, Teachers, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: This research explored student evaluation practices used by Montessori elementary teachers. The Montessori teaching method emphasized students learning at their own pace within a prepared environment where the teacher's role was somewhat different compared to traditional classroom settings. Both traditional and alternative methods of student assessment were utilized by Montessori teachers (e.g., anecdotal records, informal conferences with students, observation of students, one-to-one interview with students, checklists of lessons, demonstration of skill mastery, and standardized achievement tests). The methodology and reasoning behind student evaluation was not well understood by the educational community, and today's dynamic cultural environment demands better attention to this subject. Following a literature review of assessment practices, analysis consisted of sampling member schools of the American Montessori Society (AMS). A questionnaire was submitted to 241 eligible AMS member schools with elementary programs across the United States, and 108 responses (representing 30% of the eligible schools) were collected. The questionnaire's items (27 total questions) were refined to 16 research questions which were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A number of results were produced. The two most prominent were: Montessori elementary teachers used more alternative than traditional methods of assessment practices; and, the factors that influenced the assessment practices used by Montessori teachers were the make up (student:teacher ratio, individual student's needs, multi-aged range) of students in the classroom and the Montessori method of education. Other results of this study included: Montessori schools used standardized achievement tests but individual respondents were not convinced they fit the Montessori method of teaching; and, the combination of non-graded report cards, anecdotal records, and student portfolios were successful reporting practices for parent teacher conference. The study concluded with identifying several areas of assessment practice where future research and professional development may benefit Montessori administrators, teachers, students, and parents.

Language: English

Published: Memphis, Tennessee, 1999

Advanced Search