Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

949 results

Book

Direct Verbal Instruction Contrasted with Montessori Methods in the Teaching of Normal Four-Year-Old Children

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study compares the effects of Montessori methods of instruction and methods of direct verbal instruction. Montessori methods rely on the ability of the child to learn through physical interaction with inanimate objects and minimize verbal behavior by teacher and student, while the direct verbal method works mainly through language use, both in the teacher's presentation and the child's responses. In this research project, the Montessori group was made up of 17 upper-middle class 4-year-olds who had already participated in the program for a year. The direct verbal group, called the Academic Preschool, was comprised of 18 4-year-olds from backgrounds similar to those of the Montessori group. All the children were pre- and posttested on the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities and posttested on the Wide-Range Achievement Test (reading, arithmetic and spelling). There were no significant between-group differences at pretest, and posttest total ITPA scores were about the same as the pretest scores. The subtest differences in the second testing favored the Academic Preschool on tests involving abstraction and the Montessori group on tests of simple recognition or memory. The Academic preschool children outscored the Montessori children in all areas of the Achievement Test.

Language: English

Published: [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1969

Article

Shakespeare and Literacy: A Case Study in a Primary Classroom

Available from: Science Publications PTY LTD

Publication: Journal of Social Sciences, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 170-176

Americas, Canada, Literacy, Montessori method of education, North America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Problem statement: Childhood is an integral time for literacy development and the aim of this article is to closely examine what pedagogical strategies were most effective to promote literacy learning with a group of six to nine year old children. This case study investigates how the use of specific literacy and drama-based strategies prepared and stimulated young children’s understanding and appreciation of a Shakespeare play. Approach: The study was conducted over a period of three months in a multi-age Montessori primary classroom in Vancouver, Canada. Over 600 writing samples from the class of 22 children were analyzed. Eight classroom observations by the author and another researcher were documented, using field notes, still photo images and video. Interviews with the teacher, parents and children were undertaken and two years after the study, a focus group was conducted with eight of the original children who had participated in the initial research. Using a qualitative research approach, the data was analyzed in search of recurring patterns and themes that highlighted literacy strategies where children’s understanding and engagement with Shakespeare was most effective. Results and Conclusion: It was observed that five particular writing and drawing strategies (word wall, journal, character masks, letters and newspaper) allowed the children to develop a greater understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s work. The above literacy strategies fostered vocabulary development, understanding of plot and character motivations and the ability for the children to rehearse and perform the Shakespeare play for their peers and family. Member checking with a randomly selected group of children two years later and written feedback from parents confirmed key learning outcomes that occurred during the study.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3844/jssp.2012.170.176

ISSN: 2616-4515

Book Section

Elevations: Silence - Materialized Abstractions; A Comparison Between the Education of Normal Children and That of Those Who Are Mentally Defective; A Comparison Between Our System of Teaching Normal Children and Experimental Psychology; The Education of the Senses Leads to a Sharpening of the Senses Through Repeated Exercises

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 187-198

Maria Montessori - Writings

See More

Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Cosmology and children: A phenomenological study of the Timeline of Light

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study asks: What is it like for Montessori children, ages 11-12, to experience a current and integral approach to cosmology via the author's original Timeline of Light Curriculum? Based on the cosmological principles detailed in Swimme and Berry's The Universe Story (Swimme &Berry, 1992) the 08 December 2012 Page 5 of 14 ProQuest curriculum is integral and multidisciplinary: art, music, movement, experiment, mathematics, geometry, prose, and poetry are all employed. The children's work is used as the phenomenological data for a subsequent hermeneutic (thematic interpretation). Three themes emerge from the work: the affective ground, the creation of a metaphoric Cosmos, and identity. The affective ground is described as the ground of feeling that sets the tone for both subsequent feelings and the creation of the metaphoric cosmos. The metaphoric cosmos is the creative interpretation of both each individual child and the group. That creation is fostered by the exercises presented in the lessons. This thematic relies heavily on the expanded definitions of metaphor as defined by Lakoff and Johnson (1980), and Samples' (1993). The study also describes an emergent theme of expanded personal identity resultant from the metaphoric ways the children described their experiences throughout their studies.

Language: English

Article

Effect of Montessori on Children Development: Systematic Review

Available from: Research Gate

Publication: Teikyo Medical Journal / Teikyō Igaku Zasshi, vol. 45, no. 1

Pages: 5729-5741

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Autism, Child development, Montessori method of education - Evaluation

See More

Abstract/Notes: To find the evidence for the effectiveness of Montessori in improving children development. Systematic search was done on the PubMed, Cochrane library, Web of science, PEDro, Scopus and Google Scholar databases till May 2021. Manual search was also done to find relevant studies. Two authors independently assessed retrieved records and studies against the eligibility criteria specified for this review, then extracted data from the included studies and assess studies methodological quality by using the methodological index for non-randomized studies (MINOR) scale for the clinical studies and the national institute of health (NIH) tool for observational designs. Eighteen studies were included; fifteen on normal children and three on children with communication disorders, autism and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Quality of 5 clinical studies rated as moderate and 7 was poor, while the quality of 5 observational studies was fair and only 1 was poor. These included studies have different outcomes including gross and fine motor skills, executive function, activity of daily living and cognitive skills. Meta-analysis was not appropriate because of the included studies heterogeneity descriptive analysis indicated that Montessori seems to be effective in improving child development. Based on this review findings the present evidence promise an effective role of Montessori for improving child development. More well-designed primary studies are recommended to find clear evidence.

Language: English

ISSN: 0387-5547

Report

Investigations of Classroom and At-Home Interventions: Research and Development Program on Preschool Disadvantaged Children. Final Report. [3 volumes]

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: To determine the relative effectiveness of different methods of preschool educational intervention for disadvantaged children, comparisons were made of five programs whose levels of structure ranged from the traditional nursery school to a highly structured preschool. Subjects were 79 4-year-olds representing a wide range of ability levels. Intervention effects were evaluated at the end of the preschool year and also, at the end of the kindergarten year. Follow-up data were collected at the end of first grade for three of the programs. Preliminary results were differential and encouraging for the more structured programs. The ameliorative preschool provided a framework for the subsequent investigation of related variables: effects of initiating the program with 3-year-old, low IQ children, and the feasibility of using paraprofessional staff as teachers. Included in this report are studies undertaken to provide instructional programs for children under 3 years and to find techniques to train mothers in home intervention. (MS)

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, May 1969

Article

Designing the Ideal Children's House: How Architecture Can Help Children Learn

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 34-37

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Back to the Future? Children Living in Poverty, Early Childhood Centres and Mathematics Education

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: ZDM (Zentralblatt für Didaktik der Mathematik), vol. 46, no. 7

Pages: 999-1011

See More

Abstract/Notes: The present call for structured mathematics programmes in preschools continues a trend from the nineteenth century, in which young children’s lack of mathematical knowledge was considered to have a detrimental effect on their individual futures and those of the wider society. In this paper, an investigation of the philosophies behind several early childhood programmes shows that there is a long-standing acceptance that those not living in poverty should make decisions about the education, including the mathematics education, that children who are living in poverty should engage in. Consequently, the philosophies behind these programmes, and with them the advocated mathematics education, contribute to a homogenised view of the child. This fails to recognise the attributes that children and their communities have and situates those living in poverty as being deviant. The strong promotion in this century of structured mathematics education programmes is solidifying this homogenising process in a manner not seen in previous early childhood programmes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s11858-014-0578-y

ISSN: 1863-9704

Book

The Sands School Project: Third Year Results

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: The third year of a study comparing the performance of four groups of children attending Sands School is reported. The four groups of children were a Montessori classroom, a nongraded classroom, children with preschool experience and in conventional (graded) classrooms, and children without preschool experience and in conventional classrooms. The groups were reasonably matched in terms of age, socioeconomic status, race, and male-female ratio. The third-year evaluation consisted of three studies: interviews with 40 children, 10 from each group; interviews with a selected number of mothers of the children; and a two-part study consisting of interviews with a number of Montessori and nongraded teachers from the community and a number of Sands teachers and two administrators. The childrens' interviews focused upon social competence and maturity, self-concept, and attitudes about school; the mothers' interviews were to ascertain how involved they were in the education of their children; and the teachers' interviews concerned their attitudes about the ideal teaching environment, philosophy of teaching, role of the teacher, purpose of education, ideas about pre-school experience and kindergarten, personal aspects of teaching, and attitudes about children in the educational setting. The interview data are discussed. Appendixes to the report are: Children's Interview Schedule; Parents' Interview Schedule; Teacher Interview--Montessori; Teacher Interview--Nongraded; and Teacher Interview--Sands. (DB)

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio: Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Oct 12, 1970

Article

Montessori-Based Activities as a Transgenerational Interface for Persons With Dementia and Preschool Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 366-373

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

See More

Abstract/Notes: Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia have been used to successfully provide opportunities for programming between older adults and preschool children in shared site intergenerational care programs. Such intergenerational programming allows older adults with dementia to fulfill roles of teacher or mentor to younger children or as collaborative workmates for persons with more advanced dementia while providing children with positive one-on-one interactions with older adults. We review several studies using this approach; describe characteristics of the programs, participants, and results obtained; and provide recommendations for those interested in extending this line of work.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/15350770.2011.618374

ISSN: 1535-0770

Advanced Search