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304 results

Article

Long-Term Effects of Early Childhood Programs on Cognitive and School Outcomes

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: The Future of Children, vol. 5, no. 3

Pages: 25-50

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Abstract/Notes: The extent to which early childhood programs produce long-term benefits in children's cognitive development, socialization, and school success is a matter of some controversy. This article reviews 36 studies of both model demonstration projects and large-scale public programs to examine the long-term effects of these programs on children from low-income families. The review carefully considers issues related to research design. It includes studies of preschool education, Head Start, child care, and home visiting programs, and focuses primarily on the effects of program participation on children's cognitive development. Results indicate that early childhood programs can produce large short-term benefits for children on intelligence quotient (IQ) and sizable long-term effects on school achievement, grade retention, placement in special education, and social adjustment. Not all programs produce these benefits, perhaps because of differences in quality and funding across programs. The article concludes with recommendations for future action.

Language: English

Book

Multifaceted Strategies for Social-Emotional Learning and Whole Learner Education

Available from: IGI Global

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Abstract/Notes: With the turmoil and conflict that has been present in recent times, it is imperative that new methods of teaching are explored in order to produce emotionally secure and connected individuals. Social-emotional learning and whole learner education has emerged as a strategy to ensure that students are actively engaged in learning, the school, and their community. It teaches them tactics that allow them to better manage their emotions, maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions. It is imperative that the whole learner is supported and encouraged to ensure proper mental health, academic achievement, and social responsibility of current and future generations. 'Multifaceted Strategies for Social-Emotional Learning and Whole Learner Education' is a critical research publication that supports teachers who wish to utilize these teaching theories to meet their students’ needs academically, socially, and emotionally and to ensure that they become lifelong learners. Highlighting topics such as adult learners, professional development, and culturally responsive education, this book is ideal for teachers, guidance counselors, researchers, academicians, and students who want to improve their understanding of learners and their social-emotional growth at various stages of learning, to find strategies that will assist in the development of any learner, and to find strategic models that promote lifelong learning.

Language: English

Published: Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-79984-906-3

Article

Classroom Composition and Peer Effects

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: International Journal of Educational Research, vol. 37, no. 5

Pages: 449-481

Nongraded schools

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter examines the extent to which the composition of classes affects learning outcomes. The aim is to explore peer effects when students are organized into classes on the basis of ability, ethnicity, or gender, as well as the effects of multigrade and multi-age classes and class size. The argument is defended that these composition factors affect only the probability that differential instruction and learning occur and that, at best, their influences are indirect. Teachers appear not to change their teaching activities when class composition is changed and most often the power of peer effects is rarely realized. Any direct effects of class composition are less related to learning outcomes and more related to equity and expectation effects by teachers and other participants (students, parents, and principals). Whether a school tracks by ability or not, reduces class sizes, implements multigrade/multi-age or single-level classes, or has coeducational or single-sex classes, appears less consequential than whether it attends to the nature and quality of instruction in the classroom, whatever the between-class variability in achievement. The learning environments within the classroom, and the mechanisms and processes of learning that they foster, are by far the more powerful. Good teaching can occur independently of the class configuration or homogeneity of the students within the class.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/S0883-0355(03)00015-6

ISSN: 0883-0355

Honors Thesis

Patchwork Practices: A Critical Review of the Montessori Public School Subject

Available from: Duke University Libraries

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Abstract/Notes: In the wake of late twentieth century educational reforms like No Child Left Behind and the Every Student Succeeds Act, American public schools have become increasingly subjected to standardized accountability testing, which has made student success on standardized tests the primary criterion of federal funding for struggling schools. Billed as an equalizer of academic achievement, these standardizing measures have both overseen increasing “inequality” as well as deterioration in the breadth of educational curriculum as teachers are incentivized to "teach to the test." This thesis is a critical analysis of the Montessori method within this flattened, test-focused environment. Through an analysis of educational reform in the market-driven, neoliberal moment; a comparison between the educational philosophies of John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Maria Montessori, and Thomas Jefferson; and a compilation of fictive ethnography, I explore the tensions that arise within a public Montessori environment. I show how the public school system limits and constrains the Montessori method, and how the subject of Montessori is seemingly at odds with the public school subject. I argue that if the Montessori method is updated with pieces of Dewey’s and Freire’s philosophies and practices, we can create a public setting of high performing learners who can also think critically.

Language: English

Published: Durham, North Carolina, 2019

Article

Toward a Theory of Combination Classes

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Educational Research and Evaluation, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 281-304

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Abstract/Notes: This rejoinder replies to Veenman's (1997) critique of our (Mason & Burns, 1997a) literature review conclusion that combination classes lead to at least small negative effects. Veenman argues that his reviews (1995, 1996) lead to a conclusion that combination classes are “simply no worse and simply no better” than single‐grade classes. In our response, we identify and discuss the major disagreements we have with Veenman's findings, assumptions, and explanations. Veenman's conclusion, we explain, is hampered by a narrow reading and interpretation of the literature that appears to focus (a) too heavily on faulting teachers for failing to capitalize on the “potential positive effects” of combination classes, and (b) too lightly on interview research, observational studies, and a theory that would explain how the no‐difference achievement effects occurred.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/1380361970030401

ISSN: 1380-3611, 1744-4187

Article

The Slowdown of the Multiage Classroom: What Was Once a Popular Approach Has Fallen Victim to NCLB Demands for Grade-Level Testing

Available from: ERIC

Publication: School Administrator, vol. 62, no. 3

Pages: 22

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author discusses multiage education. Multiage education hailed as recently as 10 years ago as a promising way to restructure schools and boost student achievement but now has fallen on hard times. Interest in the issue has waned, with new research on the topic virtually nonexistent and attendance at national multiage conferences a fraction of what it once was. Schools across the country are cutting existing multiage programs, or choosing not to begin new ones. Even the state of Kentucky, which in 1990 heralded ungraded primary education as a linchpin of its sweeping school reform effort, has seen the scope of its multiage initiative reduced by half. Some trace the decline of multiage education to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and its emphasis on standardized, grade-level testing. A list of additional resources and Web sites concludes this article.

Language: English

ISSN: 0036-6439

Article

Major Montessori Research Project Announced

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 10, no. 4

Pages: 3

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Abstract/Notes: achievement, transition to traditional school

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Considering Social Equity in a New Public Management Reform: Evidence from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Public Integrity, vol. 23, no. 4

Pages: 369-384

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Abstract/Notes: This article uses the case of independent charter schools in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to test whether New Public Management style reforms are compatible with the public administration pillar of social equity. Using three years of data, the author identifies inequities in access and outcomes due to the structural differences between charter and traditional public schools. Structural differences include governance, admissions, and transportation policies. Overall, independent charter schools serve fewer Black pupils, are less accessible, but do obtain comparatively better achievement scores. The article concludes with suggestions on how metagovernance can be used to ensure social equity in decentralized governance reforms. The study demonstrates how social equity can be analytically evaluated in a governance reform environment, and provides guidance on how structural barriers to social equity can be overcome in complex governing networks.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10999922.2021.1908730

ISSN: 1099-9922

Book Section

The Spiritual Embryo

Book Title: The Secret of Childhood

Pages: 11-26

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Includes the following section(s): Biological Prelude, The New-born Baby, Nature's Teaching, The Achievement of Incarnation

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-39-2

Series: The Montessori Series , 22

Article

The Absorbent Mind

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 2008, no. 2

Pages: 70–84

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The author shares with use the cosmic elements of Montessori’s achievements, and tells an inviting story on man’s reasoning power, and the intelligence of the mind.

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

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