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576 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

How Children Find Something To Do in Preschools

Publication: Genetic Psychology Monographs, vol. 90, no. 2

Pages: 245-303

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Abstract/Notes: Conducted a 2-year observational study of a total of 81 lower- and middle-class 3-6 year olds to examine the behavior of young children in school settings which program all or part of the day as "free play" time. Results indicate that with age, children became more effective in moving from one activity to another; they spent less time in transition and longer periods in activity. Behaviors exhibited while in transition became less dependent on the immediate surrounding and seemed to indicate more autonomy. Lower-class boys had shorter activity lengths and more transitions than the other groups. A qualitative description of children's transition behavior is presented and possible implications of the findings for developmental and educational research are discussed.

Language: English

ISSN: 0016-6677

Article

Children's Choices

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 15, no. 3

Pages: 6–8

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

The Children's Laboratory

Publication: Beinn Bhreagh Recorder, vol. 10

Pages: 341-343

Alexander Graham Bell - Biographic sources, Americas, Canada, Mabel Bell - Biographic sources, Mabel Bell - Writings, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America

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Language: English

Conference Paper

Divergent Production in Montessori Children

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined the contention that teacher instruction in the "correct use" of classroom equipment, as in the Montessori training method, inhibits a child's ability to generate other uses for that same equipment. Subjects were 31 matched pairs of four- and five-year-olds from two Montessori preschools and two traditional nursery schools. Each child was given adaptations of four Unusual Uses Test from Torrance's Minnesota Tests of Creative Thinking and Writing. The tests utilized two items familiar to all children (a stuffed dog and a fork) and two Montessori equipment items (a triangular wooden block and a button frame). A comparison of the children's test results contradicted theassertion that teacher demonstration of how to use equipment inhibits creativity, whether or not the objects used are Montessori equipment items. (ST)

Language: English

Book

Montessori Children's Project, volume 1: In the Beginning

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Language: English

Published: Cleveland Heights, Ohio: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1985

Volume: 1 of 3

Article

The Effect of Montessori Daily Life Program Linked with Home on Children's Basic Living Habits and Self-Direction / 가정과 연계한 몬테소리 일상생활프로그램이 유아의 기본생활습관과 자기주도성에 미치는 영향

Available from: RISS

Publication: 아동교육 [The Korean Journal of Child Education], vol. 17, no. 4

Pages: 35-48

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-2722

Article

Teaching Children Without Class Work: Perfect Discipline Gained Almost Without Effort - System Utilizes Child's Physical Unrest - Method Has Proved Itself Effective

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: San Jose Mercury (San Jose, California)

Pages: 4

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Language: English

Article

Fort Play: Children Recreate Recess

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 20-30

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Abstract/Notes: Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase and tag, clique-bound conversations, solitary wandering and exploration, pretend and war play, recess offers reliable access to a scarce resource of immense value in the lives of children: spontaneous self-direction. Although watched over by the protective though generally unobtrusive gaze of supervising teachers, children at recess interact with their natural environment and with each other as they choose--a freedom denied them at other times while at school, and increasingly in their homes and neighborhood. As a lower elementary teacher at Lexington Montessori School (LMS) in Lexington, MA, from 1994 through 2002, the author witnessed for eight years the development of an extraordinary child-centered and spontaneous world of recess play (Powell, 2007). As children entered the elementary program at LMS, their peers initiated them into a culture of fort building. The forts, built entirely from sticks, leaves, and found objects from the surrounding woods, were the sites of considerable experimentation with different forms and rules of social organization and various styles of construction. They were also the vehicles for much of the conflict that occurred at the school. Children negotiated and clashed over ownership of land and resources and argued about the rules and roles of fort play and whether the rights of those already identified with a structure outweighed the rights of outsiders to be included. In doing so, they developed and influenced each other's reasoning about such moral principles as benevolence, justice, and reciprocity. Fort play was unpredictable, immediate, exciting, and fun, a brief window of opportunity,among hours of mostly adult-inspired activities and expectations, in which these children were free to manage their own lives and interact with each other on their own terms. As in the case of other schools where fort play has flourished, the LMS forts were in no way a programmed activity but rather a spontaneous one that simply wasn't stopped.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Children and Contagious Diseases: Things Montessorians Should Know

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 29–30

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Carolyn S. Bailey's The Montessori Children

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Bookman (New York), no. 2

Pages: 213

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Language: English

ISSN: 2156-9932

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