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507 results

Article

Developing Resilient Children: After 100 Years of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 2

Pages: 28-31

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this millennium, educators are faced with a number of issues that Dr. Maria Montessori could not have predicted. Today, students are different from the children Dr. Montessori observed in her "Casa dei Bambini." They are influenced by technology in all its forms. Some suffer from medical problems such as complex food allergies, which wreak havoc on their bodies and brains. Others have authentic learning differences that can be difficult to understand and deal with. Nonetheless, Dr. Montessori's directive that teachers respond to the "internal needs of a life in process of development" remains clear. Despite changing times, Montessori teachers remain steadfast in their approach to meet the "universal needs of the soul." Even with external pressure to conform to the demands of competitive communities, Montessori education continues to produce resilient children who persevere despite obstacles. Robert Brooks, a professor at Harvard Medical School and a leading authority on self-esteem and resilience, posits 10 guideposts that form the foundation of a resilient mindset. This article discusses these 10 guideposts which mesh with Montessori's fundamental principles of education.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Witnessing the Unlimited Potential of Children Being Peaceful: Impact of Proactive Restorative Circle Practice on Early Childhood Students in a Montessori Setting

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to study the effects that daily proactive restorative circle practice (PRCP) had on speaking skills, listening, and positive classroom culture amongst Montessori Children's House students. The research took place over a four week period of time in a two way immersion Children's House in a Montessori public charter school in the Midwest. The population included 8 students ages 4-5.5 years. Students participated in a daily proactive restorative circle each afternoon. The researcher also observed students during lunch to collect data on any influence the PRCP had outside of circle time. Data was collected through field notes, tallies, and a sense of community scale. The intervention suggested an increase in speaking skills and maintaining positive classroom culture. Students also demonstrated an increased sense of responsibility and accountability to the implementation of PRCP. Continued research is needed to determine the effectiveness of PRCP with more participants as well as how the effects of the PRCP transfer over to the general classroom experience.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

To What Extent Do Parents of Montessori-Educated Children “Do Montessori” at Home? Preliminary Findings and Future Directions

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 14-24

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, Parents - Attitudes, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Few, if any, empirical studies have explicitly examined the home environments of Montessori-educated children, and specifically whether or not Montessori parents reinforce or undermine their children’s Montessori education at home. With a sample of 30 parents of Montessori-educated toddlers and preschoolers attending a private Montessori school in the Midwest, this cross-sectional study examined Montessori parents’ knowledge of Montessori methods and their parenting beliefs and behaviors at home. Results suggested that Montessori parents from the targeted school were knowledgeable about and valued Montessori methods, even though few had a Montessori education themselves. Parents in this sample varied in their parenting behaviors and choices at home, with some parents who intentionally reinforced Montessori principles and others whose behaviors were inconsistent with a Montessori approach. Findings from this preliminary study provide a first glimpse into the beliefs and behaviors of Montessori parents from which future studies can build upon. Montessori educators and administrators will benefit from future research involving Montessori parents, particularly for those who offer Montessori-based parent education sessions to the families they serve.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i1.6737

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Children Reciting Dante

Publication: Communications: Journal of the Association Montessori Internationale (2009-2012), vol. 2012, no. 1-2

Pages: 38-40

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Abstract/Notes: Mario Federici was a well-known Italian critic and playwright, and married to Maria Agamben—a graduate in literature, teacher and journalist. During the fascist years, the couple went abroad where Maria Agamben continued to teach at Italian cultural institutes which included Montessori schools. It was that circumstance that allowed them to see from up close the exciting initiative in Barcelona: when they saw children embrace Dante in their own manner. As Trabalzini reports in her article, Agamben wrote several articles on this phenomenon. In this instance, Federici writes with absolute delight on what he and his wife had witnessed, seeing the children perform Dante, which also gave him reason to voice his utter disapproval of the old-fashioned ways of the theatre.

Language: English

ISSN: 1877-539X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Long-Term Benefits of Montessori Pre-K for Latinx Children from Low-Income Families

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Applied Developmental Science, vol. 26, no. 2

Pages: 252-266

Latin American community

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Abstract/Notes: This study used covariate adjusted regression techniques to compare the third-grade outcomes of low-income Latinx children who attended Montessori pre-K programs (n = 161) with those who graduated from more conventional programs (n = 4975) in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Children who experienced one year of Montessori education demonstrated stronger pre-academic skills at the end of pre-K and, in turn, performed better on standardized assessments of math and reading in third grade than those who did not. No differences emerged in students’ identification as gifted and talented nor in third-grade GPA. Taken together, these findings suggest that the benefits of one year of Montessori at age 4 may carry forward over time and to the extent that they do, these benefits are attributed to the fact that Montessori graduates entered kindergarten more ready academically. At the same time, however, the persisting benefits of Montessori were 60–70% smaller four years after program exit and were less robust than the end of pre-K outcomes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10888691.2020.1781632

ISSN: 1088-8691, 1532-480X

Article

Dyslexic Children Need Phonemes

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 14, no. 4

Pages: 20

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Why Montessori for Deaf Children?

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 28-31

Children with disabilities, Deaf, Deaf children - Education, Deaf students, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Article

Nurturing Children: Why "Early Learning" Doesn't Help

Available from: Institute of Marriage and Family Canada

Publication: IMFC Review: Latest Developments in Family Friendly Research, vol. 12, no. 18

Pages: 1-7

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Children should start attending school later, not earlier, Canadian development psychologist Dr. Gordon Neufeld reveals. “Early learning” programs for young children have no benefits for kids, he adds. So why are governments running down the opposite track?

Language: English

ISSN: 1715-5711

Book

Montessori for the New Millennium: Practical Guidance on the Teaching and Education of Children of All Ages, Based on A Rediscovery of the True Principles and Vision of Maria Montessori

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

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Abstract/Notes: Although Montessori's name is almost universally known in education circles today, and there are countless nursery schools throughout the world using the "Montessori Method," the real core of her thinking has remained largely misunderstood. Most people regard the method as a system for the education of very young children. And most who have some direct experience of it, either as parent or teacher, would regard it as involving a certain set of procedures and specialized educational materials with clear and elaborate instructions for their use. However, the essence of Montessori's philosophy of education is in reality far broader than this, and contains a powerful message for educators everywhere. What is less well-known about Montessori's work is that she began by establishing the effectiveness of her approach at the pre-elementary level, but also strongly encouraged the extension of her method to the higher levels of education. Wentworth's purpose in writing this book is to elucidate this vital aspect of Maria Montessori's life's work and to show how it applies to real-life teaching situations. She believed that by transforming the process of children's education she could help to transform the attitudes of the adults they will later become, and so those of society and the world at large--a message she promoted as vitally relevant to the future of humankind as a whole.

Language: English

Published: New York: Routledge, 1999

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-4106-0440-8

Doctoral Dissertation

The Use of Montessori Concrete Sequential Materials with Deaf Children

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Children with disabilities, Deaf children, Deaf students, England, Europe, Great Britain, Northern Europe, United Kingdom

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Language: English

Published: Brighton, England, 1980

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