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952 results

Article

Perspectives in Early Childhood Education: Belize, Brazil, Mexico, El Salvador and Peru

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 2012, no. 1

Pages: 1-27

Americas, Belize, Brazil, Central America, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, El Salvador, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Peru, South America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education (ECE) provision is becoming a growing priority. During the past twenty years, Latin America has shown a growing recognition in the provision of educational programs for young children, birth to age eight, is essential. Urban and rural populations intimated in 2009, that many countries utilizing equitable access to quality early childhood programs is often seen by policy makers as a means of achieving economic and political goals (United Nations, 2012). Unfortunately, a pre-occupation with economic and political goals may conflict with the provision of quality programming for young children. In a number of Latin American countries provisions for educating young children exist as intent to provide quality services. The continuing challenge is to finance, organize and regulate those well-meaning intentions. The objective of this article is two-fold. First, to describe national policy efforts that regulate the education of young children consistently. And, second, to reflect the status of early childhood education programming; and to examine the possibilities for the improvement of the quality and accessibility of an education for all young children. Five Latin American nations have been chosen for examination, including: Belize, Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, and Peru. (Contains 4 tables.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Article

The Effectiveness of a Counseling Program Based on the Use of Montessori Method on Adaptive Environmental Behavior in a Sample of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: Journal of Environmental Science, vol. 49, no. 9

Pages: 181-216

Africa, Children with disabilities, Counseling, Egypt, Middle East, Montessori method of education, North Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The present study aims to identify the effectiveness of a counseling program based on the use of the Montessori method on the environmental adaptive behavior in a sample of children with mild intellectual disabilities, identifying also the differences in the level of behavioral adaptation in a sample of children on the adaptive behavior scale pre/post application of the program. The researchers define a sample of (40) items, applied to a sample consisting of (40) children with mild intellectual disabilities, aged between (10-12) years, selected from boys, divided equally to (20) experimental samples and (20) control samples, from Al-Ghafir Foundation for people with special needs. The researcher has used the (experimental) method and applied the scale of adaptive behavior. The research has come to several results, the most important of which is that there is a statistically significant correlation between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group, regarding the post application of the total adaptive behavior scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the experimental group, regarding the post/ follow up application of the adaptive behavioral scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group regarding the post-application of the total behavior scale, in favor of the experimental group. The research reached a set of recommendations, the most important of which are: the necessity of providing the necessary tools for developing skills for children with disabilities within government institutions, setting a special budget.

Language: Arabic

ISSN: 1110-0826

Article

Honoring the Child with Dyslexia in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: 36-40

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Speaking, listening, reading, and writing are all language activities. The human capacity for speaking and listening has a biological foundation: wherever there are people, there is spoken language. Acquiring spoken language is an unconscious activity, and, barring any physical deformity or language learning disability, like severe autism, all children listen and speak. In contrast, writing systems must be consciously learned. A child beginning to read and write has to discover what sound each symbol in the written code stands for and, in English, understand that the sound may change depending upon the placement within a word (i.e. circus or success). However, for 8 percent of the population, this process is remarkably difficult. Variable and often hereditary, this difficulty in acquiring and processing written language is called dyslexia, and it is manifested by a lack of proficiency in one or more of the processes of reading, spelling, or writing. Because dyslexia is a language-based disorder, it can be predicted from language development during the pre-reading stage. Classroom teachers of many pre-reading children can be at the forefront of identifying and helping the child with dyslexia before the disability diminishes that motivation, confidence, and love of learning that denote a Montessori child. Good teachers often just "know" that a child is developing atypically, but rarely is that enough to get the child the help she needs. Some simple screening procedures can provide data to show parents and other professionals and can lend confidence to a hunch. This article offers several screening activities for the classroom teacher.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Some Educational Benefits of Freely Chosen Age Mixing among Children and Adolescents.

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Phi Delta Kappan, vol. 80, no. 7

Pages: 507-512

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Abstract/Notes: Observation of 200 children ages 4 to 19 attending a Massachusetts nongraded alternative school disclosed substantial age mixing. Younger children used older children to develop skills and acquire knowledge. Age mixing encouraged opportunities for creativity, helped match abilities, and fostered older children's sense of responsibility for younger children. (MLH)

Language: English

ISSN: 0031-7217

Article

Literacy in Early Childhood Settings in New Zealand: An Examination of Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 31-41

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Literacy, New Zealand, Oceania, Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: Recent research indicates that children develop the emergent knowledge and skills that lead to formal literacies in their homes and early childhood settings long before school entry. The research evidence is clear that emergent literacy needs to be actively encouraged in the early years, if children are to have optimum chances of learning to read at school. In New Zealand, there are only a few studies of how literacy is promoted and practised in early childhood settings. This paper examines how 107 teachers in a range of early childhood settings believe that they promote literacy and their reflections on the ways in which Te Whāriki (the national curriculum) influences that practice. The implications for promoting literacy in early childhood settings are explored.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/183693910603100206

ISSN: 1836-9391, 1839-5961

Report

Montessori Partners Serving All Children: Evaluation Report for 2012–2015

Available from: Development and Training, Inc

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Partners Serving All Children (MPSAC) is a collaborative between the Montessori Center of Minnesota (MCM) and metro-area organizations. The goal of MPSAC is to demonstrate how the Montessori approach, starting with early education, can be viable, effective, culturally responsive, and accessible for all Minnesota children, including low income children from culturally distinct families and communities. Toward that end, MCM commissioned a three-year evaluation of its MPSAC initiative, currently a partnership with four participating community-led schools. This report presents comparative data and findings from that evaluation process, including data and analysis for this third and final year. The MPSAC initiative engaged partners in community-led Montessori schools in a three-year evaluation to assess the progress of children, staff, and schools in the following areas: School structures and quality (classroom environments, professional development, ongoing mentoring, and administrative technical assistance for newly formed schools); Children’s academic, cognitive, social, and physical health; and Successful inclusion and support of parents and community.

Language: English

Article

Playing to Learn: An Overview of the Montessori Approach with Pre-school Children with Autism Spectrum Condition

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Support for Learning, vol. 31, no. 4

Pages: 313-328

Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, Preschool children

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores some of the literature concerning the effectiveness of the Montessori educational approach for children with ASC within an English school context. Firstly, there is a discussion, including a short historical review, regarding the ideology of inclusion and how it has impacted upon mainstream education. Also, how this can be facilitated using play-based approaches such as Montessori. Secondly, various models of disability are identified in order to highlight how they have informed societal attitudes towards people with disabilities. There is a brief history of ASC detailing how a child with this disability may be affected on a daily basis and the effectiveness of alternative play-based educational approaches such as Montessori in helping children with ASC to develop the appropriate skills they need in order to self-regulate and thus modify their behaviour. Furthermore, the value of play-based curriculums in supporting a child diagnosed with ASC throughout the learning process is also evaluated. The summary highlights the need for more evidence-based studies to be undertaken in order to assess whether the Montessori approach is a valid alternative in teaching pre-school children with ASC.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/1467-9604.12140

ISSN: 1467-9604

Article

Benefits of Good Shepherd Catechesis Among Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Kenya

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Journal of Religious Education, vol. 66, no. 3

Pages: 225-234

Africa, Children with disabilities, East Africa, Inclusive education, Kenya, Learning disabilities, People with disabilities, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Since Martin Luther, religious education has largely been identified with catechism that used question and answer method, particularly in the Catholic church. For a person with intellectual disability, this offers a grave difficulty in religious formation. Could there be alternatives? The present study aimed at exploring the benefits of Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (CGS) for children living with intellectual disabilities. The participants were 23 children and nine care-givers in a Catholic context in Kenya. Observation guides and interviews were used to collect data that showed that children with intellectual disabilities had the ability to spontaneously relate with the spiritual world, and in some cases, with Jesus. The findings confirmed that the CGS offers children with special needs the space, tools, and time to get in touch with the Divine through witnessing to the narrative of the Word.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s40839-018-0069-5

ISSN: 2199-4625

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of of Grace and Courtesy Lessons on Independence in Elementary Aged Children

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Independence is a skill that everyone needs to possess in order to function in society (Montessori, 1918). The study was designed to see if Grace and Courtesy lessons would help increase independence skills in elementary children. The study took place in a Montessori classroom of 35 children, aged 6-9 years old. The researcher used tally marks to calculate how often the children asked adults for help with tasks that they already knew how to perform. The researcher also tallied how often the children would perform the task after being reminded one time. Observations were done daily and the observation sheets indicated how many children were not focused on a task and when the concepts in the Grace and Courtesy lessons were being used. The study showed that there was a decrease in asking adults for help and an increase in the use of Grace and Courtesy lessons throughout the research period.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

Master Gardener Classroom Garden Project: An Evaluation of the Benefits to Children

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Children's Environments, vol. 12, no. 2

Pages: 256-263

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Abstract/Notes: The Master Gardener Classroom Garden Project provides many inner-city children in the San Antonio Independent School District with an experiential way of learning about horticulture, gardening, themselves, and their relationships with their peers. To evaluate the benefits of participation in the Classroom Garden Project, data was collected on 52 second and third grade students. Qualitative interviews indicate that participation in the gardening project has had many positive effects on the school children. The children have gained pleasure from watching the products of their labor flourish, and have had the chance to increase interactions with their parents and other adults. In addition, the children have learned the anger and frustration that occur when things of value are harmed out of neglect or violence.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2307/41503434

ISSN: 2051-0780

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