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512 results

Article

Supporting the Dyslexic Child in the Montessori Environment

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 3

Pages: 171-207

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Alison Awes provides a comprehensive review of the literature from the most current recommendations of the National Reading Panel to create a detailed description of dyslexia as she emphasizes the positive qualities of the children with this language disorder. Awes provides an expansive explanation of the Montessori method and the ways in which the Montessori materials can support the dyslexic child. When early diagnosis and intervention is partnered with an attentive guide and appropriate accommodations, the dyslexic learner can become a successful reader and learner through life. [This article was originally published in the "AMI Communications" 2012, 1-2." Reprinted with permission.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Nurturing Children's Acceptance of Differences and Disabilities in Others [CARE program (Children and Adults Recreating Equally), White Plains, NY]

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 20–21

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Includes picture essay

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori School Children Down with Measles

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: II-7

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "PASADENA- A Measly Shame "Ain't that a shame, a measly shame?" What? Why, the measles at the Montessori School. The measly plague didn't make the children so awfully sick, but they couldn't study, so the school, which is conducted in a bungalow in the Hotel Maryland court, has been temporarily closed and the rich, pampered tots of fortune who are profiting by education's latest methods are having an enforced holiday. About thirty children are enrolled at the school and consternation reigned when the measles were manifested, and it was also thought that Madame Montessori was soon to visit the school. It develops, however, that the distinguished founder of the system will not come until early in May, and by then Miss Mildred Johnston, principal of the school, and her assistant Miss Gladys Burrows, are sure the measles will all be somewhere else."

Language: English

Article

Are Nursery Schools 'Nice Places' for Children with HIV/AIDS? The Case of Karen Perreira v Buccleuch Montessori Pre-school and Primary (Pty) Ltd

Available from: Sabinet African Journals

Publication: South African Law Journal, vol. 123, no. 2

Pages: 220-231

Africa, Children's rights, HIV-positive children, Human rights, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Language: English

ISSN: 0258-2503

Article

Grace and Courtesy: Empowering Children, Liberating Adults

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 113-126

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Abstract/Notes: Ginni Sackett delves into the many implications of grace and courtesy, from social relations and the basis of community to respect for the child's personality. Her point of departure is modern social living with grace and dignity. Hers is an exploration over two generations of seeing grace and courtesy as a comprehensive social view that is the greatest goal for the Montessori teacher to empower adults and children to live sociably. She suggests that standards have changed greatly over two or three generations. To live within the school microcosm of a "society by cohesion" means that grace and courtesy is pervasive with every material used and work chosen, implying that it is part of nature's plan demonstrated by Montessori children in a prepared environment with social life practiced daily. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Grace, Courtesy, and Civility Across the Planes," Portland, OR, March 13-16, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Witnessing the Unlimited Potential of Children Being Peaceful: Impact of Proactive Restorative Circle Practice on Early Childhood Students in a Montessori Setting

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to study the effects that daily proactive restorative circle practice (PRCP) had on speaking skills, listening, and positive classroom culture amongst Montessori Children's House students. The research took place over a four week period of time in a two way immersion Children's House in a Montessori public charter school in the Midwest. The population included 8 students ages 4-5.5 years. Students participated in a daily proactive restorative circle each afternoon. The researcher also observed students during lunch to collect data on any influence the PRCP had outside of circle time. Data was collected through field notes, tallies, and a sense of community scale. The intervention suggested an increase in speaking skills and maintaining positive classroom culture. Students also demonstrated an increased sense of responsibility and accountability to the implementation of PRCP. Continued research is needed to determine the effectiveness of PRCP with more participants as well as how the effects of the PRCP transfer over to the general classroom experience.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

To What Extent Do Parents of Montessori-Educated Children “Do Montessori” at Home? Preliminary Findings and Future Directions

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 14-24

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, Parents - Attitudes, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Few, if any, empirical studies have explicitly examined the home environments of Montessori-educated children, and specifically whether or not Montessori parents reinforce or undermine their children’s Montessori education at home. With a sample of 30 parents of Montessori-educated toddlers and preschoolers attending a private Montessori school in the Midwest, this cross-sectional study examined Montessori parents’ knowledge of Montessori methods and their parenting beliefs and behaviors at home. Results suggested that Montessori parents from the targeted school were knowledgeable about and valued Montessori methods, even though few had a Montessori education themselves. Parents in this sample varied in their parenting behaviors and choices at home, with some parents who intentionally reinforced Montessori principles and others whose behaviors were inconsistent with a Montessori approach. Findings from this preliminary study provide a first glimpse into the beliefs and behaviors of Montessori parents from which future studies can build upon. Montessori educators and administrators will benefit from future research involving Montessori parents, particularly for those who offer Montessori-based parent education sessions to the families they serve.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i1.6737

ISSN: 2378-3923

Conference Paper

A Comparison of Preschool Children in Observation Tasks From Two Programs: Montessori and Science - A Process Approach

Available from: ERIC

National Association for Research in Science Teaching (47th, Chicago, Illinois, April 15-18, 1974)

Conferences, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, National Association for Research in Science Teaching (47th, Chicago, Illinois, April 15-18, 1974)

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to compare preschool children from classes using the Montessori method and Science-A Process Approach (S-APA) in the process skill of observation. The first stage of the study compared the programs with respect to (1) the sequential presentation, (2) the use of materials to provide sensory training, (3) practice acquired through activities, and (4) the role of the teacher. Conclusions were that because S-APA and Montessori seemed to have common elements and because both had taught the process of observation, there was a reasonable justification to compare student competence in observation. The second part of the study compared the competence on observational tasks of three groups of 25 children, ages 5 and 6. The first group received Montessori training for two years in preschool, the second group used S-APA for one year with background of another type of preschool that excluded Montessori, and the third group which served as a control had neither Montessori nor S-APA training in their two-year preschool experience. Students were tested on a set of observational tasks from the text, the Science Process Instrument. Findings showed no significant differences between the Montessori and the S-APA preschool students in regard to competence in observation. Both the Montessori and the S-APA groups scored higher than the control group. This work is based on the authors doctoral dissertation research.

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, Apr 1974

Book Section

Emotional gestörte und schlechtangepaßte Kinder [Emotionally disturbed and poorly adjusted children]

Book Title: Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Pages: 98-107

Children with disabilities, Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977), Mentally ill children

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Article

Use of the Montessori Model in a Preschool for Visually Impaired Children

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 15-19

Children with disabilities, Children with visual disabilities, Inclusive education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

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