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986 results

Article

Meng tai suo li jiaoyu bentu hua de tansuo / 蒙台梭利教育本土化的探索 [On the Localization of Montessori Education in Kindergarten]

Publication: Studies In Preschool Education, vol. 2016, no. 7

Pages: 64-66

Asia, China, East Asia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Both Montessori education and Chinese kindergarten curriculum aim at promoting children's comprehensive and balanced development. The emphasis and difficulty of Montessori education's localization lie in the integration of curriculum content and approach. Our exploration showed that kindergarten should open basic courses to ensure children get comprehensive and balanced development and design development courses to complement art, P.E. and social studies which were the shortcomings of Montessori education and mainly rely on regional and daily life activities to implement the courses with process evaluation.

Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1007-8169

Book

Where State Education Fails

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Abstract/Notes: Despite being published in the early part of the twentieth century many of the issues this volume discusses are still being debated in education today. The author maintains that state education is not functioning as it should – that the output is not commensurate with the outlay, that education has become too narrow in its focus and that more importance should be given to the teaching of younger children. The balance between a traditional academic education versus the skills needed for practical trades is also discussed, as is the disparity between the types of education available to rich and poor.

Language: English

Published: New York: George Routledge and Sons, 1927

Edition: 1st

Book

Montessori for the New Millennium: Practical Guidance on the Teaching and Education of Children of All Ages, Based on A Rediscovery of the True Principles and Vision of Maria Montessori

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

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Abstract/Notes: Although Montessori's name is almost universally known in education circles today, and there are countless nursery schools throughout the world using the "Montessori Method," the real core of her thinking has remained largely misunderstood. Most people regard the method as a system for the education of very young children. And most who have some direct experience of it, either as parent or teacher, would regard it as involving a certain set of procedures and specialized educational materials with clear and elaborate instructions for their use. However, the essence of Montessori's philosophy of education is in reality far broader than this, and contains a powerful message for educators everywhere. What is less well-known about Montessori's work is that she began by establishing the effectiveness of her approach at the pre-elementary level, but also strongly encouraged the extension of her method to the higher levels of education. Wentworth's purpose in writing this book is to elucidate this vital aspect of Maria Montessori's life's work and to show how it applies to real-life teaching situations. She believed that by transforming the process of children's education she could help to transform the attitudes of the adults they will later become, and so those of society and the world at large--a message she promoted as vitally relevant to the future of humankind as a whole.

Language: English

Published: New York: Routledge, 1999

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-4106-0440-8

Doctoral Dissertation

Holistic Education: Its Philosophical Underpinnings and Practical Application

Available from: Oxford University

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Abstract/Notes: The holistic education (HE) movement is loosely organised across the globe through organisational networks and particular schooling philosophies such as Montessori and Waldorf/Steiner. Movement actors define themselves in juxtaposition to what they see as public educational establishments with very different values. Given HE’s predisposition to emphasise many of the personal and social aspects of student growth that critics of mainstream schooling find lacking within the conventional education system, there has been a growing interest in ways to make these approaches more widely available within the state system. This study begins by examining the philosophical underpinnings of the holistic worldview and its implications for education through an analysis of the work of the three main HE thinker/practitioners, Maria Montessori, Rudolf Steiner and Jiddu Krishnamurti. It goes on to examine how HE ideas parallel and can be understood through the lens of the absolute idealist framework in a way that allows for a more critical examination of holistic theory and practice. With regard to the aims of education, one of HE’s defining characteristics is the emphasis it places on the development of persons through the vehicle of community and relationships. The holistic philosophy affects the work of schools in five main areas: growth as a person, development of community, notions of authority and discipline, the development of knowledge and understanding (curriculum), and modes of teaching and assessment. All of these areas are examined in turn. The study concludes with an examination of the challenges involved in implementing holistic principles and practices in a state school through a case study of an English secondary school which has been adopting a holistic model. The school’s experiences, including the results of a state inspection by Ofsted during its second year, provide some insight into the process for other schools wishing to adopt a holistic model; these include, the importance of working with a coherent theoretical framework including specific principles for practice, and of engaging in particular approaches to professional development. The school’s experience also demonstrates the need for changes to be made to the Ofsted inspection process if the government is serious about supporting schools adopting innovative approaches to education.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2007

Article

Lun meng tai suo li de ertong shenti huodong guan ji qi qishi yu juxian / 论蒙台梭利的儿童身体活动观及其启示与局限 [Montessori’s Children Physical Education Concept and Its Enlightenments]

Publication: Journal of Sports and Science, vol. 2017, no. 4

Pages: 115-120

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Physical education for children

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori, studied medicine firstly, has long engaged in children's education work. She has made outstanding contributions in the study of children’s education theory and practice. Children's physical education is an important part of children's education. She has put forward a lot of ideas for children's physical education. On the basis of synthesizing the achievements and opinions of others, this paper extracts the following four Montessori children's sports education. That is children's physical and mental development, children's freedom of movement, view of gymnastics based on physical development, and action and music theory. This paper also puts forward the inspiration of Montessori children's sports education concept in the light of the present situation of children's physical education.

Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1004-4590

Article

Montessori as an Alternative Early Childhood Education

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 191, no. 7/8 (Early Childhood Theorists and Pioneers)

Pages: 1196-1206

Comparative education, Culturally relevant pedagogy, Early childhood education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education was developed over 100 years ago, and persists as a marginal ‘niche reform’ of the standard model. Here I discuss two unresolved dichotomies in early childhood education – the tension between work and play, and between structure and freedom. I explain how Montessori collapses and thereby resolves the dichotomies, and does so in a contemporary theoretical frame – one that is dynamical rather than linear. I next describe the origins and functioning of Montessori preschool environments, outcomes from the most methodologically sound studies to date, and impediments to Montessori’s more widespread adoption. I also show how Montessori is a culturally responsive pedagogy, and conclude by return to the dichotomies and how Montessori makes sense for the modern era.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03004430.2020.1832998

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Doctoral Dissertation

Promotion of Peace and Peace Education Through Schooling: Perspectives and Experiences of Girls and Boys in Mauritius

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Africa, East Africa, Mauritius, Peace education, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: This thesis explores young boys' and girls' perceptions and experiences of their schooling in the small island developing state of Mauritius. It brings to the forefront problems related to cultural and structural violence that can hamper a peaceful schooling in three state secondary schools: a single-sex girls' school, a single-sex boys' school and a mixed school which also promote the educational theories of M. K. Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore. The findings reveal that there can be a 'fideistic' attitude to Gandhi and Tagore in this context, which highlight the need for a critical peace education that question taken-for-granted assumptions. It also shows that in schools, problems can be hidden and not discussed. The methodology was based on a participatory worldview that asserts the importance of a 'holistic inquiry' and learning from the 'Other' for peaceful coexistence. In this regard, there can be serious ethical challenges for a 'native' researcher to conduct participatory research with young people in a small-connected community like Mauritius. The research also brings together various philosophies of education and peace for the promotion of peace education. It builds on commonalities from the East and West to highlight the importance of the 'holistic' in peace education. It promotes the concept of 'wholeness' as much emphasised in the East. The research was informed by M.K. Gandhi's, Rabindranath Tagore's and Maria Montessori's educational theories for peace. It was also gender-sensitive and promoted a 'peace-focused-feminism', which is grounded in the Eastern philosophies of 'Yin' and 'Yang', 'Shakti' and 'Shiva' and 'Prakriti' and 'Purusha'.

Language: English

Published: Nottingham, England, 2018

Article

Montessori et l'Éducation à la Paix [Montessori and Peace Education]

Available from: Université de Rouen Normandie

Publication: Penser l'Éducation, vol. 18

Pages: 5-18

Peace education

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori, première femme médecin dans l'Italie du début du XXe siècle, se saisit du problème de l'éducation à partir de son travail auprès d'enfants déficients. A la suite, ses préoccupations pour une éducation á la paix vont prendre forme. L'esprit absorbant et l'embryon spirituel propres à l'enfant sont poteurs de sa méthode. Postulant une nature bonne chez l'enfant, elle prône comme élément essentiel l'éradication de la lutte entre l'enfant et l'adulte. Un homme nouveau doit naître, issu de l'enfant non contraint afin d'établir un monde où régenera la paix.

Language: French

Book

Implementing Montessori Education in the Public Sector

Available from: ERIC

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: This book on implementing Montessori education in the public sector begins w±th a historical and social overview that reveals the usefulness of Montessori pedagogy as a means of national public school reform. The second chapter discusses equipment needed for Montessori schools, the scope and sequence of curriculum used, and minimal expectations for what should be included in a Montessori classroom. Chapter Three provides a view of Montessori language arts in light of current trends, including bilingual education. Chapter Four outlines a number of implementation approaches. Chapter Five discusses ways to integrate different funding sources so that early childhood Montessori can be supported in school districts that usually do not provide prekindergarten services. Chapter Six concerns Montessori education in relation to the disabled child and special education. Chapter Seven discusses the process of starting a school in terms of development of a Proposal, common misconceptions, magnet school funding, and task force development. Cost audits from two established Montessori schools in Cincinnati are included. Chapter Eight covers admissions and recruitment, nonselective admissions,magnet school recruitment, promotions, and admission application procedures. Chapter Nine concerns parent involvement; Chapter Ten, program expansion; and Chapter Eleven, program evaluation. Numerous references are cited throughout; supportive materials are appended to some chapters. (RH)

Language: English

Published: Cleveland, OH: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1990

Report

Montessori Pre-School Education: Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Comparative Analysis, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In order to investigate the effectiveness of Montessori preschool education as compared with non-Montessori preschool education, Phase I of this study matched 2 groups, each of 21 preschool children, on intelligence quotient and certain socio-economic factors. One group attended a Montessori preschool and the other a non-Montessori preschool. The children were administered tests near the beginning and end of the preschool year to determine any differences in achievement due to the preschool training. In Phase II a trained researcher interviewed the primary grade teachers who by then had some of the preschool children of Phase I in their classrooms. Ratings of these teachers provided information on the personality and ability of 3 groups of children, (1) former Montessori preschool children, (2) former non-Montessori preschool children, and (3) non-preschool children. The children were rated on 8 major traits which contained 27 stimulus variables. Phase I data indicated that Montessori preschool children gained significantly more in verbal ability than non-Montessori preschool children. Phase II data indicated that Montessori children were superior to the children of the other 2 groups in reading readiness, interest in learning, independence, interpersonal relations, leadership, and learning ability. No differences were found in creativity or ability to adjust to the traditional-type school.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Jun 1967

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