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231 results

Article

Reinventing Civility

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 1

Pages: 138-147

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Abstract/Notes: Calls for a "renaissance in civility," discussing definitions of civility and the need to encourage manners and responsible behavior in children and adolescents. Argues that it is essential that elementary school children develop social awareness and social skills and that secondary school students be encouraged to take a more active part in their communities. (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Alice's Dream

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 40-42

Access to education, Africa, Bilingual education, Culturally relevant pedagogy, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Ghana, Montessori method of education, Rural education, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Over the years, the author has observed the vicious cycle that undermines the effectiveness of and access to good basic education in her own village and family, and in poor rural areas in general. Located in one of the most deprived areas of rural Ghana, there is a huge "reality gap" between school and children's everyday lives. The weak foundation of the early school years places children of poor rural families at a serious disadvantage. Many drop out; a few struggle on in school but without success. Their educational level is too poor to enable them to find jobs, yet they no longer fit in their communities. This further discourages parents from sending their children to school. As one of the few fortunate enough to overcome these obstacles, her life path has presented opportunities to pursue her own education and careers in rural development and early childhood education. Having completed a Master's in Education in 2004, she returned to her people with a desire to give back in a way that would make a significant impact. Born of this desire is a project to provide excellent, culturally appropriate primary education in a nurturing environment for children in northern Ghana. Children learn most effectively when teaching and learning begin with and build on what they already know. Based on Montessori's philosophy and her multisensory approach to learning, PAMBE will employ an additive bilingual method, the goal of which is to develop children who are both bilingual and biliterate in English and in their mother tongue. While they are preparing to enter the wider society where English is required for economic success, they will also, through their native language, acquire mastery and understanding of their rich cultural heritage--the history, stories, customs, music, dance, and arts of their ancestors.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Are You Leading, or Just Managing to Get By?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 17, no. 4

Pages: 34-37

Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Seven principles of leadership that empower individuals and school communities to fulfill their potential are identified in this article. In the Montessori classroom, where children share common goals and guidelines, and in the process gain independence and maturity, the teacher moves from being a manager of capricious behavior to acting as the facilitator of self-disciplined learning. Similarly, in a Montessori school community, where everyone shares a common educational vision and language, the administrative paradigm changes from one of managing people and problems to one of leading people toward their dreams and destiny.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Hidden Black Voices in the History of Montessori Education

Available from: Academia

Publication: American Educational History Journal, vol. 47, no. 2

Pages: 205-221

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori was one of Italy's first female physicians, and she developed a groundbreaking educational method based on astute observation of children's behavior while working in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Rome (Gutek 2004; Kramer 1988). As someone who witnessed the extent of injustice experienced by poor women and children particularly, she turned from medicine to focus on education, seeing its potential power for social reform (Gutek 2004). Others have been drawn to the Montessori philosophy, sharing her belief that all children have the potential to become self-motivated, independent, and lifelong learners given an appropriate environment in which to flourish. Marginalized communities in the United States find this inclusivity to be a compelling message, leading to a growing number of public Montessori schools serving disadvantaged children (Debs 2019). The work and influence of Black Montessori educators is less wellknown than the stories of their white counterparts, so we profile three Black pioneers in the field. Before elaborating on the stories of Mae Arlene Gadpaille, Roslyn Williams, and Lenore Gertrude Briggs, Black Montessori pioneers who shared Maria Montessori's belief in the power of education for social justice, we first provide background on the Montessori Method, Maria Montessori's early years, and the history of Montessori education in the United States.

Language: English

ISSN: 1535-0584

Article

Montessori Public School Pre-K Programs and the School Readiness of Low-Income Black and Latino Children

Available from: APA PsycNet

Publication: Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 106, no. 4

Pages: 1066-1079

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Latin American community, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the United States, there are a variety of early education models and curricula aimed at promoting young children's pre-academic, social, and behavioral skills. This study, using data from the Miami School Readiness Project (Winsler et al., 2008, 2012), examined the school readiness gains of low-income Latino (n = 7,045) and Black (n = 6,700) children enrolled in 2 different types of Title-1 public school pre-K programs: those in programs using the Montessori curriculum and those in more conventional programs using the High/Scope curriculum with a literacy supplement. Parents and teachers reported on children's socio-emotional and behavioral skills with the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (Lebuffe & Naglieri, 1999), whereas children's pre-academic skills (cognitive, motor, and language) were assessed directly with the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic (Nehring, Nehring, Bruni, & Randolph, 1992) at the beginning and end of their 4-year-old pre-K year. All children, regardless of curriculum, demonstrated gains across pre-academic, socio-emotional, and behavioral skills throughout the pre-K year; however, all children did not benefit equally from Montessori programs. Latino children in Montessori programs began the year at most risk in pre-academic and behavioral skills, yet exhibited the greatest gains across these domains and ended the year scoring above national averages. Conversely, Black children exhibited healthy gains in Montessori, but they demonstrated slightly greater gains when attending more conventional pre-K programs. Findings have implications for tailoring early childhood education programs for Latino and Black children from low-income communities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/a0036799

ISSN: 1939-2176, 0022-0663

Article

Instituto Nueva Escuela and Montessori Education Reform in Puerto Rico: 'We Count in a Different Way'

Available from: Digital Library of the Caribbean

Publication: Sargasso - Transforming Pedagogy: Practice, Policy, and Resistance, vol. 2018-2019, no. 1/2

Pages: 97-122

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Public Montessori, Puerto Rico

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Abstract/Notes: This article examines the trajectory of a public Montessori education movement in Puerto Rico, which has grown the largest concentration of public Montessori schools in the Caribbean and the U.S. and legally established a Montessori Education Secretariat within the public system, a groundbreaking precedent for public Montessori education worldwide. For almost three decades, a grass-roots movement led by the non-profit organization Instituto Nueva Escuela has been implementing a school transformation model built on the cornerstones of collective governance, family engagement, and Montessori pedagogy. This study explores how the movement has unleashed the agency of disenfranchised school communities to radically reform traditional public education in Puerto Rico. In the wake of Hurricane María and facing extreme austerity measures, the movement empowered collective resistance to fight for and win some of its most significant achievements, and offers innumerous lessons for the future of education reform in the Caribbean and beyond. [Este artículo examina la trayectoria de un movimiento de educación pública Montessori en Puerto Rico, que ha creado la concentración más grande de escuelas públicas Montessori en el Caribe y los EE.UU. y estableció legalmente una Secretaría Auxiliar de Educación Montessori dentro del sistema público, un precedente innovador para la educación pública Montessori mundial. Durante casi tres décadas, el movimiento comunitario liderado por la organización sin fines de lucro Instituto Nueva Escuela ha estado implementando un modelo de transformación escolar basado en los tres pilares de la gobernanza colectiva, las familias y la pedagogía Montessori. El estudio explora cómo el movimiento ha desencadenado la autogestión de las comunidades escolares más marginadas para reformar la educación pública tradicional en Puerto Rico radicalmente. Después del huracán María y enfrentando medidas extremas de austeridad, el movimiento empoderó la resistencia colectiva para luchar y ganar algunos de sus logros más significativos, y ofrece innumerables lecciones para el futuro de la reforma educativa en el Caribe y más allá.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1060-5533

Article

Peace Through Education

Publication: AMI Journal (2013-), vol. 2013, no. 1-2

Pages: 51-55

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (6th, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-10 August 1937), Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, Peace, Peace education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: 1937, Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company previously published in Communications, 1986/2-3 Two years before the outbreak of World War II, in 1937, the Sixth International Montessori Congress on Peace was held in Copenhagen. During one of the lectures the Congress participants were addressed by Maria and Mario Montessori who pleaded that humankind must come to terms with themselves and the environment. They recognized that increasing efforts were being made all over the world to understand the elusive concept of peace, as more and more groups of people were organizing peace efforts in their communities.

Language: English

ISSN: 2215-1249, 2772-7319

Article

The Possibility of Learning Written Language in Early Infancy

Publication: MoRE Montessori Research Europe newsletter

Pages: 5

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: "MORE Abstracts 2003? This work examines the early possibility of written language acquisition and describes a direct experience. In the London course of 1946, Maria Montessori said that the letters of the alphabet should be in children’s bedrooms from very early on and that she would also like to have floating letters in order to use them at children bath time. The composition of words is the precursory act of the super-language we call “reading and writing” and must not necessarily boil down to the mere writing and reading activity itself. Indeed, for Maria Montessori, “it is worth separating this act which can be clearly independent of its higher utilizations”. On the suggestion of a Montessori teacher of unquestionable experience, polished letters were presented to a one-year-old child. The great interest the child showed for this material seems to confirm the “hunger for words” that is typical of this phase, already described by Montessori and then confirmed by Nobel prize-winner John Eccles. The child we observed also showed he could use this material almost immediately to compose words like zio (“uncle”), cane (“dog”), his own name, Raul, and others besides. However, when he tried to compose the word gatto (“cat”), he found himself in insurmountable difficulty and turned to an adult saying, “No, gato no, gatto”, showing he clearly understood the sounds making up the word and thus the letters needed to compose it (gatto). This impossibility was connected to the fact that the polished letters have only one example of each letter. Therefore, a system of mobile alphabet letters was introduced so that the child could continue his fascinating work of word composition which greatly interested him. A study is being made in some child communities, in cooperation with the Montessori Studies Centre, in order to repeat this observation and to finally heed Maria Montessori’s recommendation: “Education must start at birth and the first two years are the most important for all the acquisitions of the psychic embryo”.

Language: English

ISSN: 2281-8375

Doctoral Dissertation

What Happens When Veteran and Beginner Teachers' Life Histories Intersect with High-Stakes Testing and What Does It Mean for Learners and Teaching Practice: The Making of a Culture of Fear

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This qualitative study explored the phenomenon of what happened as Florida's high-stakes accountability system intersected with a beginning and veteran teachers' life histories and different stocks of lifeworldly knowledge at demographically different lifeworld communities. Habermas' (1987) theory of communicative action was used as the theoretical framework to explore what the teachers' responses meant for learners and teaching practice. The research purpose of this study (emphasizing an interpretive approach) sought to gain insights and understandings regarding the phenomenon specifically. The practical purpose (according to critical theory) was to then use the insights gained (enlightenment) in order to contemplate the kinds of steering media and mechanisms needed to support teaching practice (emancipation) that can best satisfy the system (accountability) rationale to increase educational opportunities for all learners regardless of need. Three overarching themes central to learners and teaching practice emerged from the data obtained from interviews, classroom observations, and student products: (a) the greater the lifeworld needs of the school community (e.g., high mobility rate, low socio-economic status) the greater the response in terms of instructional and curricular accommodations designed to increase FCAT test scores; (b) the greater the colonization of the lifeworld perspective by Florida's accountability system rationale, the greater the likelihood that various social actors experienced fear in relation to FCAT; and (c) school reform efforts both past and present (including Florida's high-stakes accountability system) have consistently resulted in less educational opportunity for those learners who need it the most.

Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Songs on Hmong Vocabulary Acquisition

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Bilingualism, Displaced communities, Hmong (Asian people), Hmong American children, Hmong American families, Hmong songs, Immigrants, Language acquisition, North America, Refugees

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Abstract/Notes: This action research assessed the effects of singing a song to learn language in a bilingual classroom. The research took place at a bilingual Hmong-English Montessori preschool program. 28 preschool-aged children participated in the research which was conducted over five weeks. Data sources included a parent questionnaire, vocabulary pre-test, vocabulary post-test with a follow-up conversation, daily observation logs, and tally sheet. The children were taught 16 Hmong vocabulary words with half the words sung to the tune of a common children’s song and the other half by simple reciting. The results from the vocabulary post-test showed that there was an increase in the children’s ability to recall Hmong vocabulary taught through the song and the follow-up conversation showed that the children enjoyed learning by singing. Further research could examine the continued use of singing vocabulary to common children’s songs and its effects on language learning in the long-term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

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