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2488 results

Article

Montessori Education at a Distance, Part 2: A Mixed Methods Examination of Montessori Educators’ Response to a Global Pandemic

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 31-50

Americas, COVID-19 Pandemic, Montessori method of education, North America, Remote learning, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study offers a contextualized understanding of the distance-learning experiences of Montessori educators and students in the spring of 2020 in the wake of the COVID-19 global pandemic. In this article, we build on results reported in a separate article published in this issue of the Journal of Montessori Research. First, we analyzed qualitative data from social media and national virtual gatherings designed to support teachers as they faced the challenges created by the abrupt shift to distance learning. Second, we employed a convergent mixed-methods design to integrate these qualitative findings with the survey results reported in the previous article to provide a richer and more complete perspective on the situation. In our results, we found substantial evidence to support the resilience and durability of the Montessori Method, even in the face of adverse conditions created by a global pandemic. Despite the challenges of adaptation, Montessori educators demonstrated a commitment to the key tenets of Montessori philosophy, such as following the child and employing a holistic perspective on learning and development. While serving the whole child’s growth and development remained front and center, Montessori teachers’ approach to academics looked very different under distance learning. Still, the ongoing attention to children’s social-emotional needs will benefit both teachers and children when they return to the classroom, undoubtedly with lasting effects from pandemic-related isolation and hardship.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i1.15123

ISSN: 2378-3923

Book Section

Il messaggio universale di Maria Montessori [The universal mission of Maria Montessori]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 267-282

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Maria Montessori - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 28, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Book Section

Religione e metodo Montessori [Religion and the Montessori method]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 159-165

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Religious education

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 27, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Book Section

Presenza di Maria Montessori [Presence of Maria Montessori]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 261-266

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Maria Montessori - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 28, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Book Section

Maria Montessori: il suo ed il nostro tempo [Maria Montessori: her time and our time]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 207-226

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Maria Montessori - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 27, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Book Section

L'attivismo di Maria Montessori [The activism of Maria Montessori]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 145-157

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Maria Montessori - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 27, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Book Section

Catechesi e metodo Montessori [Catechesis and the Montessori method]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 167-170

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Religious education

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 27, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Article

Maria Montessori e a Formação de Professores: O Que Dizem as Fontes Italianas? [Maria Montessori and Teacher Education: What Do Italian Sources Say?]

Available from: Sociedade Brasileira de História da Matemática (SBHMat)

Publication: Revista de História da Educação Matemática, vol. 6, no. 3

Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Montessori method of education - Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: Neste texto é apresentado um enredo acerca da circulação de Maria Montessori a partir fontes localizadas na Itália, fruto de um estágio sanduíche cujo um dos objetivos foi de estabelecer fios narrativos que pudessem contribuir para melhor entender aspectos que estão relacionados à circulação de Montessori e o seu contexto de produção de saberes para a formação e o ensino nas primeiras décadas do século XX. É possível dizer, pós análise, que a sistematização da proposta de Montessori na forma escrita contribuiu para a divulgação do seu método, haja vista o “boom” pós publicação da Pedagogia Científica e a publicações de artigos de revistas por ela organizadas. Vale dizer, também, que os cursos de formação de professores ganharam, também, papel importante para a circulação do seu método, haja vista as convocatórias a Montessori feitas por parte do Estado, que podem ser consideradas como reconhecimento de uma expertise para responder à uma demanda prática à época. [This text presents a plot about the circulation of Maria Montessori from sources located in Italy, the result of a sandwich stage whose objective was to establish narrative threads that could contribute to better understanding aspects that are related to the circulation of Montessori and its context of knowledge production for training and teaching in the first decades of the 20th century. It is possible to say, after analysis, that the systematization of Montessori's proposal in written form contributed to the dissemination of his method, given the boom after the publication of Scientific Pedagogy and the publication of articles in journals organized by it. It is also worth mentioning that teacher training courses have also gained an important role in the circulation of their method, given the calls to Montessori made by the State, which can be considered as recognition of an expertise to respond to a practical demand at the time.]

Language: Portuguese

ISSN: 2447-6447

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori Education in Nurseries in England: Two Case Studies

Available from: British Library - EthOS

England, Europe, Great Britain, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: The study explored Montessori education in nursery schools in England. A case study strategy was employed to gain in – depth knowledge of the Montessori Method of Education practiced in two nursery schools with a small purposive sample of teachers, parents, nursery owner, Montessori governing board member and children. A qualitative approach was utilised and involved semi structured interviews with teachers, parents, nursery owner and Montessori governing board member as well as the observation of children and document interrogation. The collection of these qualitative data focused on how the teachers conceptualised best practice in Montessori education, how children learn, the role of the teacher, the nature of teacher – children interactions that occur and how the prepared learning environment in the nursery aligns with Montessori philosophy. The major findings were that the teachers’ conceptualisation of best practice revealed a measured understanding and this appeared based on the teachers not having attained certified Montessori trained teacher status. Further to this, the children’s learning was underpinned by Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) framework and Montessori principles mainly achieved through teacher –led/ initiated activities and group activities. Fewer opportunities were afforded for either child initiated activities, individual paced learning and independent access to materials. The role of the directress in the settings, which mainly focused on fulfilling routine nursery duties, did not appear to differ significantly from the teacher’s role in other early years settings. Their roles did not mirror the Montessori teacher role description which lays premium on observing children, preparation of the learning environment and acting as a crucial link between the children and the prepared environment. Again, the nature of directress (teacher) – child interactions that occurred in the settings evidenced respect for the child to some extent and was underpinned by a combination of autonomy support and control. The prepared environment in both nursery exhibited some level of conformity to the Montessori ethos but more evidently, in Nursery A than Nursery B. The findings suggested that important consideration be given to staff training to enable attainment of formal Montessori certification and the Early Years Professional Status to ensure proper interpretation and implementation of the EYFS guidelines in Montessori contexts. Similarly, resolving identified areas of seeming mismatch between Montessori principles and the EYFS provision should be prioritised at Montessori governing level.

Language: English

Published: Bangor, Wales, 2012

Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of Montessori and Non-Montessori Teachers' Beliefs About Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Preschools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: In this study, 173 preschool teachers (80 non-Montessori teachers and 93 Montessori teachers) were given a survey at two early childhood professional conferences that examined their beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP). The purpose of this study was to (a) investigate preschool teachers' beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP); (b) discover the similarities and differences in the factor structures of the Teacher's Beliefs Scale (TBS) between the study conducted by Charlesworth, Hart, Burts, Thomasson, Mosley, and Fleege in 1993 and the current study about DAP; (c) discover the similarities and differences of Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP) beliefs between Montessori teachers and preschool teachers; and (d) investigate the factors that are related to teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. The Teacher Beliefs Scale (TBS) was used to assess preschool teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. Factor analysis was used to support the validity of TBS in the current study. Multiple t-tests were used to identify the differences in developmental appropriate/inappropriate beliefs between Montessori and non-Montessori teachers. Multiple regression analyses were used to explain the relationship between variables of 173 Montessori and non-Montessori preschool teachers. Results of the study showed that a majority of preschool teachers agreed with 22 Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP) and 12 Developmentally Inappropriate Practices (DIP). Responses to seven items were different from the original study (Charlesworth et al., 1993). There was a significant difference on Inappropriate Activities and on Appropriate Child Choice between non-Montessori and Montessori teachers. There was a relationship between teachers' beliefs about DAP and teachers' educational backgrounds, teaching experiences, ethics, and DAP understanding level in the current study.

Language: English

Published: Greeley, Colorado, 2003

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