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Doctoral Dissertation

La pédagogie Montessori entre tradition et innovation: le cas de l'enseignement de la correspondance grapho-phonologique en français [Montessori pedagogy between tradition and innovation: the case of teaching grapho-phonological correspondence in French]

Available from: Theses Portal (France)

Europe, France

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Abstract/Notes: Nous montrons que la pédagogie de Maria Montessori a ses racines d’une part dans le mouvement sensualiste de Comenius, Locke, Condillac et Rousseau, et d’autre part dans celui pédagogique de Pestalozzi, Itard et Séguin. La scientificité de sa conception et la tradition de sa transmission depuis un siècle garantissent sa crédibilité et sa pertinence ; nous constatons une cohérence dans l’ensemble du matériel pour les différentes matières enseignées et dans son emploi pour les enfants de 2 à 6 ans. Cependant, concernant l’apprentissage de la lecture et de l’écriture, des variations importantes peuvent apparaître selon les langues. Ainsi le matériel utilisé aujourd’hui en Angleterre est-il particulièrement développé et performant, alors que celui en usage en France est moins riche ; mais surtout, les « Dictées muettes©» en vogue dans certaines classes nous apparaissent non seulement désuètes mais sans aucun fondement phonologique et seraient avantageusement remplacées par les « Mots-images©» en cours d’expérimentation. À cette condition, la pédagogie montessorienne pourrait être sollicitée pour renouveler l’enseignement des correspondances grapho-phonologiques du français, y compris pour les élèves en difficulté. We show that Maria Montessori’s pedagogy has its roots on the one hand in the sensualist movement of Comenius, Locke, Condillac and Rousseau and on the other hand in the pedagogic movement of Pestalozzi, Itard and Séguin. The scientificity of its conception and its traditional way of transmission since one century guarantees its credibility and its relevance. We ascertain a coherence in the whole of Montessori’s apparatus of the various subjects taught and its use by the children from 2 to 6 years old.    Nevertheless, concerning the learning of reading and writing, there are important variations from language to language.   For instance, the material used today in Great Britain is particularly numerous and impressive, whereas the one used in France is less prolific and effective. Particularly the “Dictées muettes©” that are very fashionable in many classrooms seem to us not only out-of-date but also without any phonologic foundation. It would be beneficial to replace them by the “Mots-images©” (Word-Picture Cards) that are actually under experimentation. It is a prerequisite so the Montessori pedagogy could be adopted to renew the teaching of including to students in remedial education. [We show that Maria Montessori's pedagogy has its roots on the one hand in the sensualist movement of Comenius, Locke, Condillac and Rousseau, and on the other hand in the educational movement of Pestalozzi, Itard and Séguin. The scientific nature of its conception and the tradition of its transmission for a century guarantee its credibility and relevance; we see consistency in all the material for the different subjects taught and in its use for children from 2 to 6 years old. However, when it comes to learning to read and write, there may be significant variations between languages. Thus the equipment used today in England is particularly developed and efficient, while that in use in France is less rich; but above all, the "Dictées muettes ©" in vogue in certain classes appear to us not only obsolete but without any phonological basis and would be advantageously replaced by the "Words-images ©" currently being tested. Under this condition, Montessori pedagogy could be called upon to renew the teaching of grapho-phonological correspondences in French, including for pupils in difficulty. We show that Maria Montessori’s pedagogy has its roots on the one hand in the sensualist movement of Comenius, Locke, Condillac and Rousseau and on the other hand in the pedagogic movement of Pestalozzi, Itard and Séguin. The scientificity of its conception and its traditional way of transmission since one century guarantees its credibility and its relevance. We ascertain a coherence in the whole of Montessori’s apparatus of the various subjects taught and its use by the children from 2 to 6 years old. Nevertheless, concerning the learning of reading and writing, there are important variations from language to language. For instance, the material used today in Great Britain is particularly numerous and impressive, whereas the one used in France is less prolific and effective. Particularly the “Dictées muettes ©” that are very fashionable in many classrooms seem to us not only out-of-date but also without any phonologic foundation. It would be beneficial to replace them by the “Mots-images ©” (Word-Picture Cards) that are actually under experimentation. It is a prerequisite so the Montessori pedagogy could be adopted to renew the teaching of including to students in remedial education.]

Language: French

Published: Nantes, France, 2009

Book

Montessori in Action: Building Resilient Montessori Schools

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Abstract/Notes: Join the Revolution! Build a resilient Montessori school Montessori in Action: Building Resilient Montessori Schools delivers a practical and actionable method to provide a strong Montessori experience for all children, families and educators. The first of its kind, this book offers readers a collection of modern and concrete ways to build an equitable and resilient Montessori program, by discussing topics like: Working within the unique, complex ecosystem of Montessori to build a unified community empowered to serve the mission of the school Sharing ways to create a culture of honest conversation based on the values of growth and clarity Offering ways to build strong and resilient systems that will engage the whole community and yield results Perfect for Montessori educators and administrators of all kinds, Montessori in Action will support educators in taking action! This book provides structures, tools and timetables to strengthen and improve schools. It will also earn a place in the libraries of the parents of Montessori children who desire to create and maintain an equitable environment that benefits all students, regardless of their background.

Language: English

Published: Hoboken, New Jersey: Jossey-Bass (John Wiley and Sons), 2021

ISBN: 978-1-119-76312-3

Book

Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Children with disabilities, Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977)

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Doctoral Dissertation

Montessori Education in Nurseries in England: Two Case Studies

Available from: British Library - EthOS

England, Europe, Great Britain, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: The study explored Montessori education in nursery schools in England. A case study strategy was employed to gain in – depth knowledge of the Montessori Method of Education practiced in two nursery schools with a small purposive sample of teachers, parents, nursery owner, Montessori governing board member and children. A qualitative approach was utilised and involved semi structured interviews with teachers, parents, nursery owner and Montessori governing board member as well as the observation of children and document interrogation. The collection of these qualitative data focused on how the teachers conceptualised best practice in Montessori education, how children learn, the role of the teacher, the nature of teacher – children interactions that occur and how the prepared learning environment in the nursery aligns with Montessori philosophy. The major findings were that the teachers’ conceptualisation of best practice revealed a measured understanding and this appeared based on the teachers not having attained certified Montessori trained teacher status. Further to this, the children’s learning was underpinned by Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) framework and Montessori principles mainly achieved through teacher –led/ initiated activities and group activities. Fewer opportunities were afforded for either child initiated activities, individual paced learning and independent access to materials. The role of the directress in the settings, which mainly focused on fulfilling routine nursery duties, did not appear to differ significantly from the teacher’s role in other early years settings. Their roles did not mirror the Montessori teacher role description which lays premium on observing children, preparation of the learning environment and acting as a crucial link between the children and the prepared environment. Again, the nature of directress (teacher) – child interactions that occurred in the settings evidenced respect for the child to some extent and was underpinned by a combination of autonomy support and control. The prepared environment in both nursery exhibited some level of conformity to the Montessori ethos but more evidently, in Nursery A than Nursery B. The findings suggested that important consideration be given to staff training to enable attainment of formal Montessori certification and the Early Years Professional Status to ensure proper interpretation and implementation of the EYFS guidelines in Montessori contexts. Similarly, resolving identified areas of seeming mismatch between Montessori principles and the EYFS provision should be prioritised at Montessori governing level.

Language: English

Published: Bangor, Wales, 2012

Doctoral Dissertation

An Examination of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Antibias-Antiracist Curriculm in a Montessori Setting

Available from: Lynn University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Abstract/Notes: The research consisted of a qualitative case study of three urban public Montessori schools with a population of 51% or more of students of color and a commitment of 2 years or more of CRP-ABAR within a Montessori setting. The theoretical framework used for the study was the critical race theory, which is the conceptual foundation for examining inequities in public education. This research dissertation had a focus on gaining an insight into the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents toward CRP-ABAR in Montessori schools by examining the practices in three public Montessori schools. The possible connections to student outcomes, such as behavioral referrals, suspension rates, and academic achievement for students of color were explored to determine if any connections exist between CRP-ABAR and outcomes for students of color within a public Montessori setting. Three major themes emerged of the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents about the impact of the CRP-ABAR in a Montessori setting. The CRP-ABAR could be delivered through a curriculum-oriented approach or a systemic-oriented approach and the CRP-ABAR connects to Montessori through peace-global education and the prepared teacher-environment. The CRP-ABAR practices impact students of color primarily through social emotional growth with limited academic outcomes. Even with an intentional focus and diversity training, many non-Black teachers’ perceptions of students of color included deficit theory thinking. Some parents believed racism is being dismantled through the curriculum and celebrations of diversity. Other parents identified some teachers-staff with underpinning instances of biases and insensitivity.

Language: English

Published: Boca Raton, Florida, 2020

Article

AMS Awards Teacher Education Scholarships

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 17

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Abstract/Notes: Applications-usually about 100 per cycle-are reviewed by a small AMS work group, under the leadership of the AMS Board of Directors Teachers Section chair (currently Suzanne Bayer).Since the program's inception, AMS has awarded over $550,000 to more than 200 aspiring teachers.MARYAM BEIRAMI (Early Childhood), Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, Silver Spring, MD SARAH BROWN (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO SAXON BROWN (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake St. Louis, MO NEUS CARMONA SAUS (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Goffstown, NH SARAH GALLEY (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Teacher Education/NC, Angier, NC MONICA GUCWA (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO *KRISTINE HABELMANN (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO MOLLY HARDY (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Goffstown, NH **DANIELLE HINES (Infant & Toddler), Virginia Center for Montessori Studies, Richmond, VA KAYLA IANNUZZO (Early Childhood), Summit Montessori Teacher Training Institute, Davie, FL FARZANA KHAN (Early Childhood), Dallas Montessori Teacher Education Program, Dallas, TX DEEPIKA KOTTE GANGODA THALAPITIGODAGE (Early Childhood), Midwest Montessori Teacher Training Center, Libertyville, IL CHRISTINA KRENICKI (Early Childhood), Northeast Montessori Institute, Warren, ME LAUREN LUND (Secondary I-II), Cincinnati Montessori Secondary Teacher Education Program, Cincinnati, OH KYLEE MEYER (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Education/NY, White Plains, NY EILYS ORTA (Infant & Toddler), Village Montessori Training Center, Miami, FL ALYNA PHETSINOR (Early Childhood), Midwest Montessori Teacher Training Center, Libertyville, IL ELISABETH ROSOFF (Infant & Toddler), West Side Montessori School, New York, NY LISA SCHAD (Elementary I-II), Montessori Elementary Teacher Training Collaborative, Arlington TAYLOR WEBB (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake St. Louis, MO *Scholarship awarded is from the Zell Family Scholarship Fund. **Scholarship partially funded by the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of Montessori and Non-Montessori Teachers' Beliefs About Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Preschools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: In this study, 173 preschool teachers (80 non-Montessori teachers and 93 Montessori teachers) were given a survey at two early childhood professional conferences that examined their beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP). The purpose of this study was to (a) investigate preschool teachers' beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP); (b) discover the similarities and differences in the factor structures of the Teacher's Beliefs Scale (TBS) between the study conducted by Charlesworth, Hart, Burts, Thomasson, Mosley, and Fleege in 1993 and the current study about DAP; (c) discover the similarities and differences of Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP) beliefs between Montessori teachers and preschool teachers; and (d) investigate the factors that are related to teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. The Teacher Beliefs Scale (TBS) was used to assess preschool teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. Factor analysis was used to support the validity of TBS in the current study. Multiple t-tests were used to identify the differences in developmental appropriate/inappropriate beliefs between Montessori and non-Montessori teachers. Multiple regression analyses were used to explain the relationship between variables of 173 Montessori and non-Montessori preschool teachers. Results of the study showed that a majority of preschool teachers agreed with 22 Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP) and 12 Developmentally Inappropriate Practices (DIP). Responses to seven items were different from the original study (Charlesworth et al., 1993). There was a significant difference on Inappropriate Activities and on Appropriate Child Choice between non-Montessori and Montessori teachers. There was a relationship between teachers' beliefs about DAP and teachers' educational backgrounds, teaching experiences, ethics, and DAP understanding level in the current study.

Language: English

Published: Greeley, Colorado, 2003

Article

La didattica Montessori nella scuola dell’infanzia: Un metodo per programmare spazi e tempi a misura di bambino / La didáctica Montessori en la escuela infantil: Un método para programar espacios y tiempos a medida de los niños / The Montessori approach to the Early Childhood Education: A method to organize spaces and times that fits to children

Available from: Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

Publication: RELAdEI (Revista Latinoamericana de Educación Infantil), vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 81-93

Autonomy in children, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: Nella consapevolezza che spazi e tempi costituiscono spesso il principale strumento educativo per coloro che frequentano la prima scuola a più livelli – tanto per i bambini, nei quali tali categorie contribuiscono a rafforzare il livello di familiarità con il contesto di apprendimento, quanto per gli educatori, che riconoscono spesso nell’organizzazione di spazi e tempi scolastici un fondamentale dispositivo didattico – il presente contributo intende focalizzare l’attenzione sul metodo Montessori, che rappresenta in tal senso un utile strumento per adattare spazi e tempi della programmazione educativa ai ritmi di apprendimento e ai livelli cognitivi dei bambini. Il principio 'dell’aiutami a fare da solo' alla base del metodo Montessori, che per i bambini presenta valenza emancipativa, in quanto dispositivo ideale per apprendere l’autonomia, può dunque diventare per gli educatori un utile strumento didattico per avviare un’azione trasformativa della propria esperienza professionale e per ripensare in termini progettuali il proprio agire formativo. / Los espacios y tiempos son, con frecuencia y desde diversas perspectivas, el principal instrumento educativo para los niños de Educación Infantil. Son importantes para los niños, porque contribuyen a reforzar el nivel de familiaridad con el contexto de aprendizaje, y lo son para los educadores porque la organización de los espacios y de los tiempos escolares resulta, para ellos, un dispositivo didáctico fundamental. El presente artículo quiere dirigir la atención al método Montessori que representa, en tal sentido, un instrumento útil para adaptar los espacios y los tiempos de la programación educativa a los ritmos de aprendizaje y a los niveles cognitivos de los niños. El principio de 'Ayúdame a hacerlo yo sólo' que está en la base del método Montessori, tiene para los niños un valor de emancipación en cuanto dispositivo ideal para aprender la autonomía y puede, por lo tanto, convertirse para los educadores en un instrumento didáctico útil para empezar una acción transformadora de su propia experiencia profesional y para repensar, en términos de proyecto, su propia acción educativa. / Space and time are often, and from different perspectives, the main educational tools for Early Childhood Education. They are very important for children because they help them to strengthen their level of familiarity with the context of learning, and so are for educators because the organization of space and school time acts as an essential teaching device. This article aims to draw attention to the Montessori method because it represents, in this sense, a useful tool to adapt the spaces and times of educational programming to the rhythms of learning and to cognitive levels of children. The principle of “Help me do it by myself”, which is one of the basis of the Montessori method, has a great value for emancipation as an ideal device for children to learn autonomy. This principle may, therefore, become a useful teaching tool for educators to transform their professional experience and to rethink, in terms of project, their own educational practices.

Language: Italian

ISSN: 2255-0666

Article

Proving Montessori: Identity and Dilemmas in a Montessori Teacher’s Lived Experience

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 35-48

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This phenomenological case study was conducted to better understand the experience of a Montessori teacher in a leadership role. A veteran Montessori teacher, newly hired by an established Montessori preschool, was interviewed over the course of her first year in the position. A critical discourse analysis revealed multiple social identities that contributed to her desire, and ability, to be what she felt was an authentic Montessori educator. While some of these discourses and social identities aligned, some did not, creating ideational dilemmas that affected her work, relationships, and personal identity. The findings suggest that current Montessori discourse excludes important characteristics of the teacher-lived experience. Acknowledging and discussing the social challenges Montessori teachers face is a necessary addition to teacher preparation, teacher support systems, and Montessori leadership decisions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i2.5067

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

La función y el papel desempeñado por la maestra en la obra de Montessori [The role and the function of the teacher in Montessori works]

Available from: Associação Sul-Rio-Grandense de Pesquisadores em História da Educação

Publication: Revista História da Educação, vol. 14, no. 32

Pages: 31-51

Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: A função da professora constitui um aspecto fundamental dentro do sistema teórico montessoriano. De fato, Montessori atribui à professora um papel muito delicado: facilitar o correto crescimento da criança “pai do homem”. É por isto que o papel e a função da professora montessoriana devem responder aos pontos fortes de sua teoria educativa: a necessidade de que haja uma forte idéia de escola, a necessidade de diferenciar o momento teórico do momento prático e o papel desempenhado pelo desempenho científico da professora; o respeito que ambos devem ter com a criança (nem a professora nem a ciência podem fixar a priori os resultados de cada criança: potencialmente a excelência é para todos); o xeque a qualquer pretensão de neutralidade/objetividade: quando a relação é com seres humanos é sem sentido pensar que existam técnicos capazes de transmitir conceitos de maneira asséptica. Como dito anteriormente, a professora em Montessori se pode definir como um técnico, no sentido de que não é o científico a que lê corresponde a elaboração teórica senão técnico. Um técnico que não é nem neutro nem asséptico e cuja humanidade se colocará em um primeiro plano para que possa levar a cabo seu próprio trabalho o melhor possível. [The function of the teacher constitutes a fundamental aspect inside Montessori's system of thought. She offers to teacher a very delicate role, that of helping the right growth of child as "man's father". For this reason the role and the function of Montessori teacher must correspond to the principle points of her educative theory, that is to say: the necessity to have a strong idea of school; the need of clearly separating the practical moment (teacher) from the theoretical one (scientist); the respect due to the child both by scientist and teacher (neither teacher nor scientist can pre-established the results of the single child: potentially everyone can become an excellent pupil); the defeat of the idea of neutrality/absolute objectivity, that is to say that when you deal with human being you cannot pretend to transmit notions in a neutral way. Starting from this assumptions Montessori teacher can be certainly defined a technician, but she is a new kind of technician, because she isn't neutral, but on the contrary her humanity is in the foreground so that she can become an excellent teacher. / La función de la maestra constituye un aspecto fundamental dentro del sistema teórico montessoriano. De hecho, Montessori le atribuye a la maestra un papel muy delicado: facilitar el correcto crecimiento del niño "padre del hombre". Es por esto que el papel y la función de la maestra montessoriana deben responder a los puntos de fuerza de su teoría educativa: la necesidad de que haya una fuerte idea de escuela; la necesidad de diferenciar el momento teórico del momento práctico y el papel desempeñado por el científico del desempeñado por la maestra; el respeto que ambos deben tener del niño (ni la maestra ni el científico pueden fijar a priori los resultados de cada niño: potencialmente la excelencia es para todos); el jaque mate a cualquier pretensión de neutralidad/objetividad: cuando la relación es con seres humanos es un sinsentido pensar que existan técnicos capaces de traspasar nociones de manera aséptica. Según cuanto dicho anteriormente, la maestra en Montessori se puede definir como un técnico, en el sentido de que no es el científico al que le corresponde la elaboración teórica sino un técnico. Un técnico que no es para nada ni neutro ni aséptico y cuya humanidad se colocará en un primer plano para que pueda llevar a cabo su propio trabajo lo mejor posible.]

Language: Portuguese

ISSN: 2236-3459

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