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222 results

Master's Thesis (M. Ed.)

Differences in Mathematics Scores Between Students Who Receive Traditional Montessori Instruction and Students Who Receive Music Enriched Montessori Instruction

Available from: Library and Archives Canada

Mathematics education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation

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Abstract/Notes: While a growing body of research reveals the beneficial effects of music on education performance the value of music in educating the young child is not being recognized, particularly in the area of Montessori education. This study was an experimental design using a two-group post-test comparison. A sample of 200 Montessori students aged 3 to 5-years-old were selected and randomly placed in one of two groups. The experimental treatment was an "in-house" music enriched Montessori program and children participated in 3 half-hour sessions weekly, for 6 months. This program was designed from appropriate early childhood educational pedagogies and was sequenced in order to teach concepts of pitch, dynamics, duration, timbre, and form. The instrument used to measure mathematical achievement was the Test of Early Mathematics Ability-3 to determine if the independent variable, music instruction had any effect on students' mathematics test scores, the dependent variable. The results showed that subjects who received music enriched Montessori instruction had significantly higher mathematics scores. When compared by age group, 3 year-old students had higher scores than either the 4 or 5 year-old children.

Language: English

Published: Windsor, Ontario, Canada, 2005

Article

Question and Answer: Montessori Approach to Mathematics

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 2006, no. 2

Pages: 36–38

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Is Mathematics Really a Difficult Subject?

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 7

Pages: 25-31

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Article

Mathematics and the Human Mind

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 17, no. 4

Pages: 1, 14–15

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Language: English

Article

Montessori Mathematics: A Neuroscientific Perspective

Publication: AMI Journal (2013-), vol. 2014-2015

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Abstract/Notes: Benedetto Scoppola demonstrates interdisciplinary skills can enrich easily and document that “Maria Montessori really knew” the recent discoveries of neuroscience.”

Language: English

ISSN: 2215-1249, 2772-7319

Article

Mathematics: Encouraging the Process

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 9

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Language: English

Article

Algebra in the Primary Classroom: Sensorial Basis for Elementary Mathematics

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 37, no. 3

Pages: 5–7, 10

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Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Mathematical Literacy: The Effects of Mathematics Journals on Student Understanding of Fractions in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: It is a typical Monday morning. As students enter the classroom wearing brightly colored polo shirts embroidered with the school logo, their smiles are equally bright. This Title I public school in the heart of the city where 96% of the students qualify for free or reduced lunch has recently opened a Montessori option. Walking into the classroom, one 5th grade student eagerly asks, “Who’s on the bread committee this week?” Baking bread is a weekly occurrence in the upper elementary (4th – 6th grade) Montessori classroom. During the first week of school, this same student vehemently threw materials to the floor declaring, “I HATE fractions!” In an effort to positively engage students in mathematics, the weekly bread-making tradition was implemented. Through cooking, students experience the importance of fractions in everyday life. Each week, two students work together, read several recipes, select one, and submit a precise written list of needed ingredients. The next day, with the aid of a bread machine bought for $10 at the local thrift store, the students work together to follow directions, read fractions, measure ingredients, and bake bread. Once baked, students divide the bread into equal portions and serve. After several months of this routine, some recipes will need to be doubled or halved, and on it goes… The bread committee provides a “hook” for some resistant students. It is also a practical application of the role of literacy in mathematics. The choice to focus on mathematical literacy and the effect of journaling on student understanding was influenced by research around mathematical vocabulary as well as the instructional practices of noted educators and researchers. The rigor of upper elementary math as defined in the common core requires students to not only perform calculations with accuracy, but to demonstrate strong reading comprehension through the interpretation of real-world word problems, and to articulate an understanding of MATHEMATICAL LITERACY 3 mathematical reasoning through clear and concise writing. Achieving grade level proficiency has practical life implications for students because research showed mathematical knowledge during elementary school as a strong predictor of financial stability in adulthood, and understanding fractions in fifth grade as a predictor of overall achievement in mathematics (Siegler & Lortie-Forgues, 2015).

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Montessori Mathematics Curriculum and Lower Elementary Students Understanding of Length Measurement

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Mathematics education, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The intent of this action research project was to determine to what extent the Montessori Mathematics curriculum support lower elementary students’ understanding of length measurement. The research took place in a private Montessori school classroom with first and second-grade students. There were 22 students in the class, 11 first graders, and 11 second-graders. Data was collected through a pre and post-test, field notes, and observations. The students also kept a journal and performed self-assessments. Photographs were taken to record the students’ use of different measurement tools. Children’s literature about length measurement was read and discussed with the students. The data indicated that students in first and second grade have a difficult time understanding length measurement, particularly reading standard measurement tools. While the Montessori mathematics curriculum supports student understanding of length measurement, it is clear that some of the students need to have other opportunities using nonstandard tools. Overall, the Montessori mathematics curriculum supported students understanding of length measurement. The findings suggest that additional materials need to be introduced in the classroom for students to utilize, and many opportunities are available to measure with nonstandard tools to completely understand measurement and length.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Doctoral Dissertation

Math Play: Growing and Developing Mathematics Understanding in an Emergent Play-Based Environment

Available from: University of California eScholarship

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Abstract/Notes: This project explores how mathematics growth and development can be supported, documented and assessed in an emergent play-based early childhood education environment inspired by the practices and principles of Reggio Emilia. Using the California Preschool Learning Foundations as a framework, Math Play includes developmentally appropriate activities and environments that support cognitive development within the mathematics domain. This curriculum documents how a classroom's emergent themes were interwoven into activities and environments that did not oppose the practices and principles of the approach. Math Play successfully documented each child's mathematic understanding as well as areas needing further growth and development. With the California Preschool Learning Foundations as a framework, teachers can use Math Play to establish a child's level of understanding within this domain that plays one of important roles in assessing a child's school readiness. Math Play provides examples of how teachers can use authentic formative portfolios for assessment of growth and development. Math Play provides an alternative for standardized assessment in an emergent play-based environment that authenticates the experiences that preschool children are having while growing and developing in a Reggio Emilia inspired environment. After implementation of Math Play the following two findings were deduced : 1. Children engaged and demonstrated a range of mathematic growth and development that corresponds with the eighteen sub-strands of the California Preschool Learning Foundations. 2. Authentic formative portfolios provided an effective way to discuss individual child mathematic growth and development with assistant teachers and parents. In addition to these findings the children who were involved in this research continued to grow and develop by engaging in activities that furthered their mathematic foundation after Math Play implementation

Language: English

Published: San Diego, California, 2012

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