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570 results

Article

The Child Before Seven Years of Age; The Child After Seven Years of Age; and What Children Taught Dr. Montessori

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 82-99

Mario M. Montessori - Writings, Renilde Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: The three lectures reprinted here, given in 1957 London Elementary course, integrate the Montessori perspective on the Elementary child and Cosmic Education: (1) differences between children before and after 7 years of age; (2) characteristics of children 7 years and older; and (3) the adult role in responding to children in the second stage of development. (Author)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

Dr. Maria Montessori's 1946 Lectures, Karachi, India

Asia, India, Lakshmi A. Kripalani - Writings, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, South Asia, Trainings

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Language: English

Published: Houston, Texas: Houston Montessori Center, 2002

Article

Hidden Black Voices in the History of Montessori Education

Available from: Academia

Publication: American Educational History Journal, vol. 47, no. 2

Pages: 205-221

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori was one of Italy's first female physicians, and she developed a groundbreaking educational method based on astute observation of children's behavior while working in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Rome (Gutek 2004; Kramer 1988). As someone who witnessed the extent of injustice experienced by poor women and children particularly, she turned from medicine to focus on education, seeing its potential power for social reform (Gutek 2004). Others have been drawn to the Montessori philosophy, sharing her belief that all children have the potential to become self-motivated, independent, and lifelong learners given an appropriate environment in which to flourish. Marginalized communities in the United States find this inclusivity to be a compelling message, leading to a growing number of public Montessori schools serving disadvantaged children (Debs 2019). The work and influence of Black Montessori educators is less wellknown than the stories of their white counterparts, so we profile three Black pioneers in the field. Before elaborating on the stories of Mae Arlene Gadpaille, Roslyn Williams, and Lenore Gertrude Briggs, Black Montessori pioneers who shared Maria Montessori's belief in the power of education for social justice, we first provide background on the Montessori Method, Maria Montessori's early years, and the history of Montessori education in the United States.

Language: English

ISSN: 1535-0584

Article

Montessori education for environmental education

Publication: Montessori Voices [Montessori Aotearoa New Zealand], no. 77

Pages: 21

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1178-6213, 2744-662X

Article

Pandemic Adaptations in Puerto Rico

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 12-13

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Abstract/Notes: In English and Spanish.

Language: English, Spanish

Article

Observation-a parent's perspective

Publication: Montessori Voices [Montessori Aotearoa New Zealand], no. April

Pages: 7–9

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: observation experience at Totara Hill Montessori Preschool

Language: English

ISSN: 1178-6213, 2744-662X

Article

Influencia del método Montessori en el aprendizaje de la matemática escolar / Influence of the Montessori Method on Learning School Mathematics

Available from: Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia

Publication: Revista de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación, vol. 11, no. 3

Pages: 555-568

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Mathematics education, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Actualmente, el aprendizaje de la matemática escolar se ha constituido en un problema latente, generado por diversos factores, entre ellos, los métodos usados por el profesor. El objetivo de la investigación consistió en establecer la influencia que tiene el método Montessori en el fortalecimiento del pensamiento lógico-matemático en los infantes de grado tercero, en una Institución educativa colombiana. La metodología fue cuantitativa, con diseño cuasi-experimental; la información fue recogida en un diario de campo por observación directa y una prueba de entrada-salida; los datos se procesaron con el software SPSS y las hipótesis se comprobaron con la prueba de Wilcoxon. Los resultados mostraron que el método Montessori plasmado en una secuencia didáctica, influyó de manera significativa en el aprendizaje estudiantil asociado a las operaciones de adición y multiplicación con números naturales. Se concluye que este método promueve el aprendizaje significativo de los escolares, basado en experiencias y descubrimientos. / Currently, the learning of school mathematics has become a latent problem, generated by various factors, including the methods used by the teacher. The objective of the research was to establish the influence of the Montessori method in strengthening logical-mathematical thinking in third grade infants, in a Colombian educational institution. The methodology was quantitative, with a quasi-experimental design; the infor-mation was collected in a field diary by direct observation and an entry-exit test; the data were processed with the SPSS software and the hypotheses were verified with the Wilcoxon test. The results showed that the Montessori method, embodied in a didactic sequence, significantly influenced student learning associated with the operations of addition and multiplication with natural numbers. It is concluded that this method promotes meaningful learning in schoolchildren, based on experiences and discoveries.

Language: English

DOI: 10.19053/20278306.v11.n3.2021.13354

ISSN: 2027-8306, 2389-9417

Article

Some Ideological Considerations in the Bauhaus for the Development of Didactic Activities: The Influence of the Montessori Method, the Modernism, and the Gothic

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Thinking Skills and Creativity, vol. 27

Pages: 167-176

Architecture, Bauhaus, Modernism (Architecture), Montessori schools

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Abstract/Notes: The way in which Industrial Design confronts materiality and transforms it into products of use, obeys influences that are not always scientific. From its origin, artistic movements, ideologies, culture, technology and market demands, among many others, have continually modeled its epistemology and phenomenology. The Bauhaus, established a conception of Design almost a century ago but that is still valid in Latin America, even though its extreme dogmatism was the cause of its decline. In this opportunity, we review the influence of the Gothic, the Montessori pedagogy, the ideologies of the late nineteenth century, intuition and modernism, as central aspects in the original didactic and with it we have developed a simple classroom exercise, where they apply to identify the original elements that still prevail in the teaching practice of Design. These influences tend to be forgotten, but they have evolved since 1919, until decanting in the “Design Thinking” method, which, with the filters of contemporaneity, has put the own way of “thinking and doing” of the design at the disposal of other disciplines.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.tsc.2018.02.007

ISSN: 1871-1871

Article

The Effect of Using Montessori Method on Developing Kindergartener's Speaking and Reading skills

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة التربية في القرن 21 للدراسات التربوية والنفسية [Journal of Education in the 21st Century for Educational and Psychological Studies], vol. 1, no. 10

Pages: 1-23 (Article 3)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Egypt, Language development, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North Africa, Reading - Academic achievement

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Abstract/Notes: play and have fun, the learning and teaching processes should be suited totheir nature. There is a number of known interesting learning activitieswhich are based on the arts, games and other oral activities. Thus Englishshould be taught as a means of communication and researchers should dotheir best to help EFL learners to develop their reading and speaking skills.Ur (2000: 12) declared that "out of all the four skills ,listening,speaking, reading and writing, speaking seems the most important, peoplewho speak a language are known as speakers of the language, as if speakingincluded all other kinds of knowing a target language" Today, many secondlanguage learners give the speaking skill priority in their learning because ifthey master this skill then they will be considered as if they have masteredall of the other skills.The importance of speaking is best shown with the integration of theother language skills. For instance, speaking can help students develop theirvocabulary and grammar and improve their writing skill. Ability to read isthe primary fundamental skill required for children to achieve academicsuccess. Currently, the expectation is that all children should begin readingearly and be able to read on grade level by third grade (U.S. Department ofEducation, 2002)Another way that speaking and reading are connected is throughdecoding .decoding is the process of pulling apart the sounds that each(1)letter makes, and then putting them back together to make a word.it is mucheasier for a child to sound out a word on the page that they have alreadyheard in conversation, than a completely new word. There less informationto process since the meaning and the pronunciation of the word are alreadyknown. A child who has heard more words spoken is at an advantage whenlearning to read, the skill of reading is special and often difficult to acquire.the fact that anyone learns how to read is something of a miracle. Learningto read is different from learning to speak; in the development of humanhistory, speaking precedes reading by thousands of yearsItalian educator and physician Maria Montessori developed aninnovative teaching methodology for children that left an indelible mark oneducation curricula throughout the world. Montessori education is a sensorybasedpedagogy that is based on the belief that children learn at their ownpace through manipulation of objects (Lopata, Wallace, & Finn,2005).According to Montessori, (Montessori, 1967, p.14). the goal ofeducation is “to be able to find activities that are so intrinsically meaningfulthat we want to throw ourselves into them” (Crain : 2004) confirmed thisassertion by noting that “when children find tasks that enable them todevelop their naturally emerging capacities, they become interested in themand concentrate deeply on them.In general, there is a need for more research regarding successfuleducational methods and pedagogy for this disenfranchised populationbecause the existing research does not adequately provide educationalplanners with the resources or information to develop effective programs(Williams:2001) examined the impact of the Montessori Method on(2)refugee children‟s social, cognitive and motor development using adifference-in-difference approach .The Montessori method of teachingaimed the fullest possible development of the whole child, ultimatelypreparing him for life‘s many rich experiences. Complemented by hertraining in medicine, psychology and anthropology, Dr .Maria Montessori(1870-1952) developed her philosophy of education based upon actualobservation of children.Students are assigned their own personal workstations designed witheducational items that correspond to the daily lesson plans and activities.Students are responsible for setting up the work area, choosing the learningactivity, applying the physical materials, and returning the materials back tothe shelves (Pickering: 2004).Children are always free to move around theroom and are not given deadlines for the various learning tasks. Desks arearranged into open networks that encourage meaningful group discourse, aswell as independent learning.Students work together with the teachers to organize time strategicallyin order to complete the necessary learning tasks of the day. The amount ofteachers in the classroom varies based on class size, but usually two teachersare used for sections with thirty or more students, In most settings, childrenare grouped in mixed ages and abilities based on three to six-year incrementssuch as 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-15 and 15-18 (other Montessori schools use onlythree year increment settings). Ages are mixed so that older students canassist and mentor the younger children in the group. Students are groupedaccording to common interests and experiences rather than the ability andskill level (Pickering: 2004).According to Montessori, from birth to age three the child learnsprimarily through the “unconscious absorbent mind.” During education in(3)the first three years, Montessori believed that it was necessary for theparents to develop in the role of unobtrusive educator; there to protect andguide without infringing on the child‟s right to self-discovery (Crain: 2004).This early developmental model enabled children to learn their own skillsat their own place. During the ages of three to six the child begins to utilizethe “conscious absorbent mind” which prompts students to participate increative problem-solving consisting of wooden and metal objects of varioussizes and shapes, personally designed by Montessori. If a problem becomestoo difficult or overwhelming for the student, the teacher delays the projectfor a future day. Children also engage in practical work consisting ofhousehold tasks and personal maintenance.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jsep.2020.84322

ISSN: 2682-1931

Article

Montessori en un contexto multicultural: ¿se pueden realizar buenas prácticas educativas en contextos vulnerables? [Montessori in multicultural context: Can best educational practices be carried out in vulnerable contexts?]

Available from: Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

Publication: RELAdEI (Revista Latinoamericana de Educación Infantil), vol. 8, no. 1-2

Pages: 147-153

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Abstract/Notes: La educación multicultural ha estado en el punto de mira durante décadas desde finales del siglo pasado. El fenómeno de la inmigración y los asentamientos masivos en determinados puntos de nuestro país, obligaron a las autoridades a cubrir las necesidades de estos nuevos núcleos poblacionales. De este modo, surgieron nuevas escuelas que poco a poco iban transformándose en guetos de un alumnado inmigrante que desconocía tanto la cultura como la lengua del país de destino. Estos centros educativos, focos de controversia, se han convertido en un reto para sus docentes que, implicados/as en su labor, han ido transformando la realidad para conseguir mejorar la calidad. En este contexto, situamos la “buena práctica” en educación infantil, donde una profesora con un alumnado en riesgo ha hecho realidad su sueño de trasladar la metodología Montessori a su clase. / Multicultural Education has been in the spotlight for ages. During the last decades of last century, the phenomenon of immigration and the development of massive settlements of immigrant communities in certain parts of Spain led political and educational authorities to confront and help in assisting the needs of these growing social groups. In this way, new school communities emerged but they slowly became into ghettos of immigrant students who, in many occasions, did know little or nothing about the target language or culture of their new country. These schools may have been seen as spots of controversy and they have indeed been a challenge for their teachers, who have been able to improve the quality of education through their daily work. Considering this context, we place the concept of ‘good practice’ in young children education at the core of this article by making reference to the experience of a female teacher who has made true her dream of implementing Montessori Methodology in a risk group of Infant students.

Language: Spanish

ISSN: 2255-0666

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